• We present our deep $Y$-band imaging data of a two square degree field within the F22 region of the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. The observations were conducted using the WIRCam instrument mounted at the Canada--France--Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). The total on-sky time was 9 hours, distributed uniformly over 18 tiles. The scientific goals of the project are to select faint quasar candidates at redshift $z>2.2$, and constrain the photometric redshifts for quasars and galaxies. In this paper, we present the observation and the image reduction, as well as the photometric redshifts that we derived by combining our $Y$-band data with the CFHTLenS $u^*g'r'i'z'$ optical data and UKIDSS DXS $JHK$ near-infrared data. With $J$-band image as reference total $\sim$80,000 galaxies are detected in the final mosaic down to $Y$-band $5\sigma$ point source limiting depth of 22.86 mag. Compared with the $\sim$3500 spectroscopic redshifts, our photometric redshifts for galaxies with $z<1.5$ and $i'\lesssim24.0$ mag have a small systematic offset of $|\Delta{z}|\lesssim0.2$, 1$\sigma$ scatter $0.03<\sigma_{\Delta z} < 0.06$, and less than 4.0% of catastrophic failures. We also compare to the CFHTLenS photometric redshifts, and find that ours are more reliable at $z\gtrsim0.6$ because of the inclusion of the near-infrared bands. In particular, including the $Y$-band data can improve the accuracy at $z\sim 1.0-2.0$ because the location of the 4000\AA-break is better constrained. The $Y$-band images, the multi-band photometry catalog and the photometric redshifts are released at \url{http://astro.pku.edu.cn/astro/data/DYI.html}.
  • In this paper, we explore the physics of the accretion and jet in narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1). Specifically, we compile a sample composed of 16 nearby NLS1 with $L_{\rm bol}/L_{\rm Edd} \gtrsim 0.1$. We investigate the mutual correlation between their radio luminosity $L_{\rm R}$, X-ray luminosity $L_{\rm X}$, optical luminosity $L_{\rm 5100}$ and black hole mass $M_{\rm BH}$. By adopting partial correlation analysis: (1) we find a positive correlation between $L_{\rm X}$ and $M_{\rm BH}$, and (2) we find a weak positive correlation between $L_{\rm R}$ and $L_{5100}$. However, we don't find significant correlations between $L_{\rm R}$ and $L_{\rm X}$ or between $L_{\rm X}$ and $L_{5100}$ after considering the effect of the black hole mass, which leads to a finding of the independence of $L_{\rm X}/L_{\rm Edd}$ on $L_{5100}/L_{\rm Edd}$. Interestingly, the findings that $L_{\rm X}$ is correlated with $M_{\rm BH}$ and $L_{\rm X}/L_{\rm Edd}$ is not correlated with $L_{5100}/L_{\rm Edd}$ support that the X-ray emission is saturated with increasing $\dot{M}$ for $L_{\rm bol}/L_{\rm Edd} \gtrsim 0.1$ in NLS1s, which may be understood in the framework of slim disc scenario. Finally, we suggest that a larger NLS1 sample with high quality radio and X-ray data is needed to further confirm this result in the future.
  • This is the second installment for the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) Quasar Survey, which includes quasars observed from September 2013 to June 2015. There are 9024 confirmed quasars in DR2 and 10911 in DR3. After cross-match with the SDSS quasar catalogs and NED, 12126 quasars are discovered independently. Among them 2225 quasars were released by SDSS DR12 QSO catalogue in 2014 after we finalised the survey candidates. 1801 sources were identified by SDSS DR14 as QSOs. The remaining 8100 quasars are considered as newly founded, and among them 6887 quasars can be given reliable emission line measurements and the estimated black hole masses. Quasars found in LAMOST are mostly located at low-to-moderate redshifts, with a mean value of 1.5. The highest redshift observed in DR2 and DR3 is 5. We applied emission line measurements to H$\alpha$, H$\beta$, Mg{\sc ii} and C{\sc iv}. We deduced the monochromatic continuum luminosities using photometry data, and estimated the virial black hole masses for the newly discovered quasars. Results are compiled into a quasar catalog, which will be available online.
  • We present the discovery of strong Balmer line absorption in H$\alpha$ to H$\gamma$ in two luminous low-ionization broad absorption line quasars (LoBAL QSOs) at z~1.5, with black hole masses around $10^{10}$ $M_\odot$ from near-IR spectroscopy. There are only two previously known quasars at z>1 showing Balmer line absorption. SDSS J1019+0225 shows blueshifted absorption by ~1400 km/s with an H$\alpha$ rest-frame equivalent width of 13 \AA{}. In SDSS J0859+4239 we find redshifted absorption by ~500 km/s with an H$\alpha$ rest-frame equivalent width of 7 \AA{}. The redshifted absorption could indicate an inflow of high density gas onto the black hole, though we cannot rule out alternative interpretations. The Balmer line absorption in both objects appears to be saturated, indicating partial coverage of the background source by the absorber. We estimate the covering fractions and optical depth of the absorber and derive neutral hydrogen column densities, $N_{\rm{H\,I}}\sim1.3\times 10^{18}$ cm$^{-2}$ for SDSS J1019+0225 and $N_{\rm{H\,I}}\sim9\times 10^{17}$ cm$^{-2}$ for SDSS J0859+4239, respectively. In addition, the optical spectra reveal also absorption troughs in HeI* $\lambda3889$ and $\lambda3189$ in both objects.
  • We report the result of a faint quasar survey in a one square degree field. The aim is to test the Y-K/g-z and J-K/i-Y color selection criteria for quasars at faint magnitude, to obtain a complete sample of quasars based on deep optical and near-infrared color-color selection, and to measure the faint end of quasar luminosity function (QLF) over a wide redshift range. We carried out a quasar survey based on the Y-K/g-z and J-K/i-Y quasar selection criteria, using the deep Y-band data obtained from our CFHT/WIRCam Y-band images in a two-degree field within the F22 field of the VIMOS VLT deep survey, optical co-added data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 and deep near-infrared data from the UKIDSS Deep Extragalactic Survey in the same field. We discovered 25 new quasars at 0.5 < z < 4.5 and i < 22.5 mag within one square degree field. The survey significantly increases the number of faint quasars in this field, especially at z ~ 2-3. It confirms that our color selections are highly complete in a wide redshift range (z < 4.5), especially over the quasar number density peak at z ~ 2-3, even for faint quasars. Combining all previous known quasars and new discoveries, we construct a sample with 109 quasars, and measure the binned QLF and parametric QLF. Although the sample is small, our results agree with a pure luminosity evolution at lower redshift and luminosity evolution and density evolution model at redshift z > 2.5.
  • We modified the broadband photometric reverberation mapping (PRM) code, JAVELIN, and tested the availability to get broad line region (BLR) time delays that are consistent with the spectroscopic reverberation mapping (SRM) project SDSS-RM. The broadband light curves of SDSS-RM quasars produced by convolution with the system trans- mission curves were used in the test. We found that under similar sampling conditions (evenly and frequently sampled), the key factor determining whether the broadband PRM code can yield lags consistent with the SRM project is the flux ratio of the broad emission line to the reference continuum, which is in line with the previous findings. We further found a critical line-to-continuum flux ratio, about 6%, above which the mean of the ratios between the lags from PRM and SRM becomes closer to unity, and the scatter is pronouncedly reduced. We also tested our code on a subset of SDSS Stripe 82 quasars, and found that our program tends to give biased lag estimations due to the observation gaps when the R-L relation prior in Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is discarded. The performance of the damped random walk (DRW) model and the power-law (PL) structure function model on broadband PRM were compared. We found that given both SDSS-RM-like or Stripe 82-like light curves, the DRW model performs better in carrying out broadband PRM than the PL model.
  • We present a spectroscopic redshift catalog from the LAMOST Complete Spectroscopic Survey of Pointing Area (LaCoSSPAr) in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC), which is designed to observe all sources (Galactic and extra-galactic) by using repeating observations with a limiting magnitude of $r=18.1~mag$ in two $20~deg^2$ fields. The project is mainly focusing on the completeness of LAMOST ExtraGAlactic Surveys (LEGAS) in the SGC, the deficiencies of source selection methods and the basic performance parameters of LAMOST telescope. In both fields, more than 95% of galaxies have been observed. A post-processing has been applied to LAMOST 1D spectrum to remove the majority of remaining sky background residuals. More than 10,000 spectra have been visually inspected to measure the redshift by using combinations of different emission/absorption features with uncertainty of $\sigma_{z}/(1+z)<0.001$. In total, there are 1528 redshifts (623 absorption and 905 emission line galaxies) in Field A and 1570 redshifts (569 absorption and 1001 emission line galaxies) in Field B have been measured. The results show that it is possible to derive redshift from low SNR galaxies with our post-processing and visual inspection. Our analysis also indicates that up to 1/4 of the input targets for a typical extra-galactic spectroscopic survey might be unreliable. The multi-wavelength data analysis shows that the majority of mid-infrared-detected absorption (91.3%) and emission line galaxies (93.3%) can be well separated by an empirical criterion of $W2-W3=2.4$. Meanwhile, a fainter sequence paralleled to the main population of galaxies has been witnessed both in $M_r$/$W2-W3$ and $M_*$/$W2-W3$ diagrams, which could be the population of luminous dwarf galaxies but contaminated by the edge-on/highly inclined galaxies ($\sim30\%$).
  • We present near-IR spectroscopy of 22 luminous low-ionization broad absorption line quasars (LoBAL QSOs) at redshift 1.3<z<2.5, with 12 objects at z~1.5 and 10 at z~2.3. The spectra cover the rest-frame H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ line regions, allowing us to obtain robust black hole mass estimates based on the broad H$\alpha$ line. We use these data, augmented by a lower redshift sample from the SDSS, to test the proposed youth scenario for LoBALs, which suggests LoBALs to constitute an early short lived evolutionary stage of quasar activity, by probing for any difference in their masses, Eddington ratios or rest-frame optical spectroscopic properties compared to normal quasars. In addition we construct the UV to mid-IR spectral energy distributions (SED) for the LoBAL sample and a matched non-BAL quasar sample. We do not find any statistically significant difference between LoBAL QSOs and non-BAL QSOs in their black hole mass or Eddington ratio distributions. The mean UV to mid-IR SED of the LoBAL QSOs is consistent with non-BAL QSOs, apart from their stronger reddening. At z>1 there is no clear difference in their optical emission line properties. We do not see particularly weak [OIII] nor strong FeII emission. The LoBAL QSOs do not show a stronger prevalence of ionized gas outflows as traced by the [OIII] line, compared to normal QSOs of similar luminosity. We conclude that the optical-MIR properties of LoBAL QSOs are consistent with the general quasar population and do not support them to constitute a special phase of AGN evolution.
  • We present a spectroscopic survey of high-redshift, luminous galaxies over four square degrees on the sky, aiming to build a large and homogeneous sample of Ly$\alpha$ emitters (LAEs) at $z\approx5.7$ and 6.5, and Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at $5.5<z<6.8$. The fields that we choose to observe are well-studied, such as SXDS and COSMOS. They have deep optical imaging data in a series of broad and narrow bands, allowing efficient selection of galaxy candidates. Spectroscopic observations are being carried out using the multi-object spectrograph M2FS on the Magellan Clay telescope. M2FS is efficient to identify high-redshift galaxies, owing to its 256 optical fibers deployed over a circular field-of-view 30 arcmin in diameter. We have observed $\sim2.5$ square degrees. When the program is completed, we expect to identify more than 400 bright LAEs at $z\approx5.7$ and 6.5, and a substantial number of LBGs at $z\ge6$. This unique sample will be used to study a variety of galaxy properties and to search for large protoclusters. Furthermore, the statistical properties of these galaxies will be used to probe cosmic reionization. We describe the motivation, program design, target selection, and M2FS observations. We also outline our science goals, and present a sample of the brightest LAEs at $z\approx5.7$ and 6.5. This sample contains 32 LAEs with Ly$\alpha$ luminosities higher than 10$^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$. A few of them reach $\ge3\times10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$, comparable to the two most luminous LAEs known at $z\ge6$, `CR7' and `COLA1'. These LAEs provide ideal targets to study extreme galaxies in the distant universe.
  • A brief Chandra observation of the ultraluminous quasar, SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.326, showed it to be a relatively bright, soft X-ray source with a count rate of about 1 ct/ks. In this paper we present results for the quasar from a 65ks XMM-Newton observation, which well constrains its spectral shape. The quasar is clearly detected with a total of $\sim$ 460 net counts in the 0.2-10 keV band. The spectrum is characterised by a simple power-law model with photon index of $\Gamma = 2.30^{+0.10}_{-0.10}$, and the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity is $3.14\times10^{45}$ erg $\text{s}^{-1}$. The 1 $\sigma$ upper limit to any intrinsic absorption column density is $N_{H} = 6.07\times 10^{22} {\text{cm}}^{-2}$. No significant iron emission lines were detected. We derive the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio $\alpha_{\text{ox}}$ of $-1.74\pm$0.01, consistent with the values found in other quasars of comparable ultraviolet luminosity. We did not detect significant flux variations either in the XMM-Newton exposure or between XMM-Newton and XMM-Newton observations, which are separated by $\sim$ 8 months. The X-ray observation enables the bolometric luminosity to be calculated after modelling the spectral energy distribution: the accretion rate is found to be sub-Eddington.
  • We present the first discoveries from a survey of $z\gtrsim6$ quasars using imaging data from the DECam Legacy Survey (DECaLS) in the optical, the UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) and a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS) in the near-IR, and ALLWISE in the mid-IR. DECaLS will image 9000 deg$^2$ of sky down to $z_{\rm AB}\sim23.0$, and UKIDSS and UHS, which will map the northern sky at $0<DEC<+60^{\circ}$, reaching $J_{\rm VEGA}\sim19.6$ (5-$\sigma$). The combination of these datasets allows us to discover quasars at redshift $z\gtrsim7$ and to conduct a complete census of the faint quasar population at $z\gtrsim6$. In this paper, we report on the selection method of our search, and on the initial discoveries of two new, faint $z\gtrsim6$ quasars and one new $z=6.63$ quasar in our pilot spectroscopic observations. The two new $z\sim6$ quasars are at $z=6.07$ and $z=6.17$ with absolute magnitudes at rest-frame wavelength 1450 \AA\ being $M_{1450}=-25.83$ and $M_{1450}=-25.76$, respectively. These discoveries suggest that we can find quasars close to or fainter than the break magnitude of the Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF) at $z\gtrsim6$. The new $z=6.63$ quasar has an absolute magnitude of $M_{1450}=-25.95$. This demonstrates the potential of using the combined DECaLS and UKIDSS/UHS datasets to find $z\gtrsim7$ quasars. Extrapolating from previous QLF measurements, we predict that these combined datasets will yield $\sim200$ $z\sim6$ quasars to $z_{\rm AB} < 21.5$, $\sim1{,}000$ $z\sim6$ quasars to $z_{\rm AB}<23$, and $\sim 30$ quasars at $z>6.5$ to $J_{\rm VEGA}<19.5$.
  • We present initial results from the first systematic survey of luminous $z\sim 5.5$ quasars. Quasars at $z \sim$ 5.5, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium, quasar evolution and the early super-massive black hole growth. However, it has been very challenging to select quasars at redshifts 5.3 $\le z \le$ 5.7 using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distributions. We develop a new selection technique for $z \sim$ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near-IR and mid-IR photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), UKIRT InfraRed Deep Sky Surveys - Large Area Survey (ULAS), VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) and Wide field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). From our pilot observations in SDSS-ULAS/VHS area, we have discovered 15 new quasars at 5.3 $\le z \le$ 5.7 and 6 new lower redshift quasars, with SDSS z band magnitude brighter than 20.5. Including other two $z \sim$ 5.5 quasars already published in our previous work, we now construct an uniform quasar sample at 5.3 $\le z \le$ 5.7 with 17 quasars in a $\sim$ 4800 square degree survey area. For further application in a larger survey area, we apply our selection pipeline to do a test selection by using the new wide field J band photometric data from a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS). We successfully discover the first UHS selected $z \sim$ 5.5 quasar.
  • Very few low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) QSOs have been found at high redshifts to date. One high-redshift LoBAL QSO, J0122+1216, was recently discovered at the Lijiang 2.4-m Telescope with an initial redshift determination of 4.76. Aiming to investigate its physical properties, we carried out follow-up observations in the optical and near-IR spectroscopy. Near-IR spectra from UKIRT and P200 confirms that it is a LoBAL, with a new redshift determination of $4.82\pm0.01$ based on the \mgii~ emission-line. The new \mgii~ redshift determination reveals strong blueshifts and asymmetry of the high-ionization emission lines. We estimated a black hole mass of $\sim 2.3\times 10^9 M_\odot$ and Eddington ratio of $\sim 1.0$ according to the empirical \mgii-based single-epoch relation and bolometric correction factor. It is possible that strong outflows are the result of an extreme quasar environment driven by the high Eddington ratio. A lower limit on the outflowing kinetic power ($>0.9\% L_{Edd}$) was derived from both emission and absorption lines, indicating these outflows play a significant role in the feedback process to regulate the growth of its black hole as well as host galaxy evolution.
  • We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the {\it z=6.326} quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is, by far the most optically luminous, and radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z>6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas $\times$5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6+/-9.0 micro-Jy/beam and a total flux density of 88+/-19 micro-Jy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2-D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to $\rm (7.1+/-3.5) mas x (3.1+/-1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40+/-20) pc x (18+/-10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be T_{B}=(1.6 +/- 1.2) x 10^{7} K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star forming galaxies, indicating an AGN origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example to study the radio activity in optically luminous and radio quiet active galactic nuclei in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.
  • We report new IRAM/PdBI, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and VLA observations of the ultraluminous quasar SDSSJ010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter, J0100+2802) at z=6.3, which hosts the most massive supermassive black hole (SMBH) of 1.24x10^10 Msun known at z>6. We detect the [C II] 158 $\mu$m fine structure line and molecular CO(6-5) line and continuum emission at 353 GHz, 260 GHz, and 3 GHz from this quasar. The CO(2-1) line and the underlying continuum at 32 GHz are also marginally detected. The [C II] and CO detections suggest active star formation and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxy. The redshift determined with the [C II] and CO lines shows a velocity offset of ~1000 km/s from that measured with the quasar Mg II line. The CO (2-1) line luminosity provides direct constraint on the molecular gas mass which is about (1.0+/-0.3)x10^10 Msun. We estimate the FIR luminosity to be (3.5+/-0.7)x10^12 Lsun, and the UV-to-FIR spectral energy distribution of J0100+2802 is consistent with the templates of the local optically luminous quasars. The derived [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratio of J0100+2802 is 0.0010+/-0.0002, which is slightly higher than the values of the most FIR luminous quasars at z~6. We investigate the constraint on the host galaxy dynamical mass of J0100+2802 based on the [C II] line spectrum. It is likely that this ultraluminous quasar lies above the local SMBH-galaxy mass relationship, unless we are viewing the system at a small inclination angle.
  • We present the discovery of nine quasars at $z\sim6$ identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of $z\sim6$ quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at $5.7<z\le6.4$, including 29 quasars with $z_{\rm AB}\le20$ mag selected from 11,240 deg$^2$ of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with $20\le z_{\rm AB}\le20.5$ selected from 4223 deg$^2$ of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to $z_{\rm AB}\approx22$ mag from the 277 deg$^2$ in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of $-29.0\le M_{1450}\le-24.5$. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at $z\sim6$. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ($M_{1450}\ge-23$ mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope $\beta$ of the QLF is well constrained to be $\beta=-2.8\pm0.2$. Due to the small number of low-luminosity quasars, the faint-end slope $\alpha$ and the characteristic magnitude $M_{1450}^{\ast}$ are less well constrained, with $\alpha=-1.90_{-0.44}^{+0.58}$ and $M^{\ast}=-25.2_{-3.8}^{+1.2}$ mag. The spatial density of luminous quasars, parametrized as $\rho(M_{1450}<-26,z)=\rho(z=6)\,10^{k(z-6)}$, drops rapidly from $z\sim5$ to 6, with $k=-0.72\pm0.11$. Based on our fitted QLF and assuming an IGM clumping factor of $C=3$, we find that the observed quasar population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the $z\sim6$ IGM at $\sim90$\% confidence. Quasars may still provide a significant fraction of the required photons, although much larger samples of faint quasars are needed for more stringent constraints on the quasar contribution to reionization.
  • This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ~ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ~ 5. Combined our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ~ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range 4.7 <= z < 5.4 and -29 < M1450 <= -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/Va method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as alpha = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope beta = -3.58+/-0.24 and a fainter break magnitude M*1450 = -26.98+/-0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a luminosity evolution and density evolution (LEDE) model. Using the best fit QLF, the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background at z ~ 5 is found to be 18% - 45% with a clumping factor C of 2 - 5. Our sample suggests an evolution of radio loud fraction with optical luminosity but no obvious evolution with redshift.
  • The inner boundary of a black hole accretion disk is often set to the marginally stable circular orbit (or the innermost stable circular orbit, ISCO) around the black hole. It is important for the theories of black hole accretion disks and their applications to astrophysical black hole systems. Traditionally, the marginally stable circular orbit is obtained by considering the equatorial motion of a test particle around a black hole. However, in reality the accretion flow around black holes consists of fluid, in which the pressure often plays an important role. Here we consider the influence of fluid pressure on the location of marginally stable circular orbit around black holes. It is found that when the temperature of the fluid is so low that the thermal energy of a particle is much smaller than its rest energy, the location of marginally stable circular orbit is almost the same as that in the test particle case. However, we demonstrate that in some special cases the marginally stable circular orbit can be different when the fluid pressure is large and the thermal energy becomes non-negligible comparing with the rest energy. We present our results for both the cases of non-spinning and spinning black holes. The influences of our results on the black hole spin parameter measurement in X-ray binaries and the energy release efficiency of accretion flows around black holes are discussed.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • We report exploratory \chandra\ observation of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.30. The quasar is clearly detected by \chandra\ with a possible component of extended emission. The rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity is 9.0$^{+9.1}_{-4.5}$ $\times$ 10$^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$ with inferred photon index of $\Gamma$ = 3.03$^{+0.78}_{-0.70}$. This quasar is X-ray bright, with inferred X-ray-to-optical flux ratio \aox\ $=-1.22^{+0.07}_{-0.05}$, higher than the values found in other quasars of comparable ultraviolet luminosity. The properties inferred from this exploratory observation indicate that this ultraluminous quasar might be growing with super-Eddington accretion and probably viewed with small inclination angle. Deep X-ray observation will help to probe the plausible extended emission and better constraint the spectral features for this ultraluminous quasar.
  • High-redshift quasars are important tracers of structure and evolution in the early universe. However, they are very rare and difficult to find when using color selection because of contamination from late-type dwarfs. High-redshift quasar surveys based on only optical colors suffer from incompleteness and low identification efficiency, especially at $z\gtrsim4.5$. We have developed a new method to select $4.7\lesssim z \lesssim 5.4$ quasars with both high efficiency and completeness by combining optical and mid-IR Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometric data, and are conducting a luminous $z\sim5$ quasar survey in the whole Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We have spectroscopically observed 99 out of 110 candidates with $z$-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5 and 64 (64.6\%) of them are quasars with redshifts of $4.4\lesssim z \lesssim 5.5$ and absolute magnitudes of $-29\lesssim M_{1450} \lesssim -26.4$. In addition, we also observed 14 fainter candidates selected with the same criteria and identified 8 (57.1\%) of them as quasars with $4.7<z<5.4$ . Among 72 newly identified quasars, 12 of them are at $5.2 < z < 5.7$, which leads to an increase of $\sim$36\% of the number of known quasars at this redshift range. More importantly, our identifications doubled the number of quasars with $M_{1450}<-27.5$ at $z>4.5$, which will set strong constraints on the bright end of the quasar luminosity function. We also expand our method to select quasars at $z\gtrsim5.7$. In this paper we report the discovery of four new luminous $z\gtrsim5.7$ quasars based on SDSS-WISE selection.
  • A small fraction($<10\%$) of SDSS main sample galaxies(MGs) have not been targeted with spectroscopy due to the the fiber collision effect. These galaxies have been compiled into the input catalog of the LAMOST extra-galactic survey and named as the complementary galaxy sample. In this paper, we introduce the project and the status of the spectroscopies of the complementary galaxies in the first two years of the LAMOST spectral survey(till Sep. of 2014). Moreover, we present a sample of 1,102 galaxy pairs identified from the LAMOST complementary galaxies and SDSS MGs, which are defined as that the two members have a projected distance smaller than 100 kpc and the recessional velocity difference smaller than 500 $\rm kms^{-1}$. Compared with the SDSS only selected galaxy pairs, the LAMOST-SDSS pairs take the advantages of not being biased toward large separations and therefor play as a useful supplement to the statistical studies of galaxy interaction and galaxy merging.
  • We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in Large Sky Area Multi- Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes pilot survey and the first year regular survey. There are 3921 quasars identified with reliability, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the H{\alpha}, H{\beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photo- metric data with model fitting as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, and flags indicating the selec- tion methods, broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are available online. 28% of the 3921 quasars are selected with optical- infrared colours independently, indicating that the method is quite promising in completeness of quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the on-going quasar survey will provide valuable data in the studies of quasars.
  • We report the discovery of an ultra-luminous quasar J030642.51+185315.8 (hereafter J0306+1853) at redshift 5.363, which hosts a super-massive black hole (SMBH) with $M_{BH} = (1.07 \pm 0.27) \times10^{10}~M_\odot$. With an absolute magnitude $M_{1450}=-28.92$ and bolometric luminosity $L_{bol}\sim3.4\times10^{14} L_{\odot}$, J0306+1853 is one of the most luminous objects in the early Universe. It is not likely to be a beamed source based on its small flux variability, low radio loudness and normal broad emission lines. In addition, a $z=4.986$ Damped Ly$\alpha$ system (DLA) with $\rm [M/H]=-1.3\pm0.1$, among the most metal rich DLAs at $z \gtrsim 5$, is detected in the absorption spectrum of this quasar. This ultra-luminous quasar puts strong constraint on the bright-end of quasar luminosity function and massive-end of black hole mass function. It will provide a unique laboratory to the study of BH growth and the co-evolution between BH and host galaxy with multi-wavelength follow-up observations. The future high resolution spectra will give more insights to the DLA and other absorption systems along the line-of-sight of J0306+1853.
  • So far, roughly 40 quasars with redshifts greater than z=6 have been discovered. Each quasar contains a black hole with a mass of about one billion solar masses ($10^9 M_\odot$). The existence of such black holes when the Universe was less than 1 billion years old presents substantial challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the coevolution of black holes and galaxies. Here we report the discovery of an ultra-luminous quasar, SDSS J010013.02+280225.8, at redshift z=6.30. It has an optical and near-infrared luminosity a few times greater than those of previously known z>6 quasars. On the basis of the deep absorption trough on the blue side of the Ly $\alpha$ emission line in the spectrum, we estimate the proper size of the ionized proximity zone associated with the quasar to be 26 million light years, larger than found with other z>6.1 quasars with lower luminosities. We estimate (on the basis of a near-infrared spectrum) that the black hole has a mass of $\sim 1.2 \times 10^{10} M_\odot$, which is consistent with the $1.3 \times 10^{10} M_\odot$ derived by assuming an Eddington-limited accretion rate.