• A water soluble amorphous form of silk was made by ultra-short laser pulse irradiation and detected by nanoscale IR mapping. An optical absorption-induced nanoscale surface expansion was probed to yield the spectral response of silk at IR molecular fingerprinting wavelengths with a high ~20 nm spatial resolution defined by the tip of the probe. Silk microtomed sections of 1-5 micrometers in thickness were prepared for nanoscale spectroscopy and a laser was used to induce amorphisation. Comparison of silk absorbance measurements carried out by table-top and synchrotron Fourier transform IR spectroscopy proved that chemical imaging obtained at high spatial resolution and specificity (able to discriminate between amorphous and crystalline silk) is reliably achieved by nanoscale IR. A nanoscale material characterization using synchrotron IR radiation is discussed.
  • Molecular alignment underpins optical, mechanical, and thermal properties of materials, however, its direct measurement from volumes with micrometer dimensions is not accessible, especially, for structurally complex bio-materials. How the molecular alignment is linked to extraordinary properties of silk and its amorphous-crystalline composition has to be accessed by a direct measurement from a single silk fiber. Here, we show orientation mapping of the internal silk fiber structure via polarisation-dependent IR absorbance at high spatial resolution of 4.2 micrometers and 1.9 micrometers in a hyper-spectral IR imaging by attenuated total reflection using synchrotron radiation in the spectral fingerprint region around 6 micrometers wavelength. Free-standing longitudinal micro-slices of silk fibers, thinner than the fiber cross section, were prepared by microtome for the four polarisation method to directly measure the orientational sensitivity of absorbance in the molecular fingerprint spectral window of the amide bands of b-sheets and amorphous polypeptides of silk. Flat lateral micro-slices of silk eliminates shape related artefact in determination of absorbance anisotropy and order parameters of the amide bands.
  • We propose to use femtosecond direct laser writing technique to realize dielectric optical elements from photo-resist materials for the generation of structured light from purely geometrical phase transformations. This is illustrated by the fabrication and characterization of spin-to-orbital optical angular momentum couplers generating optical vortices of topological charge from 1 to 20. In addition, the technique is scalable and allows obtaining microscopic to macroscopic flat optics. These results thus demonstrate that direct 3D photopolymerization technology qualifies for the realization of spin-controlled geometric phase optical elements.
  • Understanding of material behaviour at nanoscale under intense laser excitation is becoming critical for future application of nanotechnologies. Nanograting formation by linearly polarised ultra-short laser pulses has been studied systematically in fused silica for various pulse energies at 3D laser printing/writing conditions, typically used for the industrial fabrication of optical elements. The period of the nanogratings revealed a dependence on the orientation of the scanning direction. A tilt of the nanograting wave vector at a fixed laser polarisation was also observed. The mechanism responsible for this peculiar dependency of several features of the nanogratings on the writing direction is qualitatively explained by considering the heat transport flux in the presence of a linearly polarised electric field, rather than by temporal and spatial chirp of the laser beam. The confirmed vectorial nature of the light-matter interaction opens new control of material processing with nanoscale precision.
  • Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a wide bandgap van der Waals material that has recently emerged as promising platform for quantum photonics experiments. In this work we study the formation and localization of narrowband quantum emitters in large flakes (up to tens of microns wide) of hBN. The emitters can be activated in as-grown hBN by electron irradiation or high temperature annealing, and the emitter formation probability can be increased by ion implantation or focused laser irradiation of the as-grown material. Interestingly, we show that the emitters are always localized at edges of the flakes, unlike most luminescent point defects in 3D materials. Our results constitute an important step on the road map of deploying hBN in nanophotonics applications.
  • Atomically thin transitional metal ditellurides like WTe2 and MoTe2 have triggered tremendous research interests because of their intrinsic nontrivial band structure. They are also predicted to be 2D topological insulators and type-II Weyl semimetals. However, most of the studies on ditelluride atomic layers so far rely on the low-yield and time-consuming mechanical exfoliation method. Direct synthesis of large-scale monolayer ditellurides has not yet been achieved. Here, using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, we demonstrate controlled synthesis of high-quality and atom-thin tellurides with lateral size over 300 {\mu}m. We found that the as-grown WTe2 maintains two different stacking sequences in the bilayer, where the atomic structure of the stacking boundary is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The low-temperature transport measurements revealed a novel semimetal-to-insulator transition in WTe2 layers and an enhanced superconductivity in few-layer MoTe2. This work paves the way to the synthesis of atom-thin tellurides and also quantum spin Hall devices.
  • Percolation of gold films of ~15 nm thickness was controlled to achieve the largest openings during Au deposition. Gold was evaporated on 300-nm-thick films of nanostructured porous and columnar SiO2, TiO2 and MgF2 which were deposited by controlling the angle, rotation speed during film formation and ambient pressure. The gold films were tested for SERS performance using thiophenol reporter molecules which form a stable self-assembled monolayer on gold. The phase retardation of these SERS substrates was up to 5% for wavelengths in the visible spectral range, as measured by Stokes polarimetry. The SERS intensity on gold percolation films can reach 10^3 counts/(mW.s) for tight focusing in air, while back-side excitation through the substrate has shown the presence of an additional SERS enhancement via the Fresnel near-field mechanism.