• Combining deep neural networks with structured logic rules is desirable to harness flexibility and reduce uninterpretability of the neural models. We propose a general framework capable of enhancing various types of neural networks (e.g., CNNs and RNNs) with declarative first-order logic rules. Specifically, we develop an iterative distillation method that transfers the structured information of logic rules into the weights of neural networks. We deploy the framework on a CNN for sentiment analysis, and an RNN for named entity recognition. With a few highly intuitive rules, we obtain substantial improvements and achieve state-of-the-art or comparable results to previous best-performing systems.
  • We introduce a novel architecture for dependency parsing: \emph{stack-pointer networks} (\textbf{\textsc{StackPtr}}). Combining pointer networks~\citep{vinyals2015pointer} with an internal stack, the proposed model first reads and encodes the whole sentence, then builds the dependency tree top-down (from root-to-leaf) in a depth-first fashion. The stack tracks the status of the depth-first search and the pointer networks select one child for the word at the top of the stack at each step. The \textsc{StackPtr} parser benefits from the information of the whole sentence and all previously derived subtree structures, and removes the left-to-right restriction in classical transition-based parsers. Yet, the number of steps for building any (including non-projective) parse tree is linear in the length of the sentence just as other transition-based parsers, yielding an efficient decoding algorithm with $O(n^2)$ time complexity. We evaluate our model on 29 treebanks spanning 20 languages and different dependency annotation schemas, and achieve state-of-the-art performance on 21 of them.
  • In this paper, we propose a probabilistic parsing model, which defines a proper conditional probability distribution over non-projective dependency trees for a given sentence, using neural representations as inputs. The neural network architecture is based on bi-directional LSTM-CNNs which benefits from both word- and character-level representations automatically, by using combination of bidirectional LSTM and CNN. On top of the neural network, we introduce a probabilistic structured layer, defining a conditional log-linear model over non-projective trees. We evaluate our model on 17 different datasets, across 14 different languages. By exploiting Kirchhoff's Matrix-Tree Theorem (Tutte, 1984), the partition functions and marginals can be computed efficiently, leading to a straight-forward end-to-end model training procedure via back-propagation. Our parser achieves state-of-the-art parsing performance on nine datasets.
  • Reward augmented maximum likelihood (RAML) is a simple and effective learning framework to directly optimize towards the reward function in structured prediction tasks. RAML incorporates task-specific reward by performing maximum-likelihood updates on candidate outputs sampled according to an exponentiated payoff distribution, which gives higher probabilities to candidates that are close to the reference output. While RAML is notable for its simplicity, efficiency, and its impressive empirical successes, the theoretical properties of RAML, especially the behavior of the exponentiated payoff distribution, has not been examined thoroughly. In this work, we introduce softmax Q-distribution estimation, a novel theoretical interpretation of RAML, which reveals the relation between RAML and Bayesian decision theory. The softmax Q-distribution can be regarded as a smooth approximation of Bayes decision boundary, and the Bayes decision rule is achieved by decoding with this Q-distribution. We further show that RAML is equivalent to approximately estimating the softmax Q-distribution. Experiments on three structured prediction tasks with rewards defined on sequential (named entity recognition), tree-based (dependency parsing) and irregular (machine translation) structures show notable improvements over maximum likelihood baselines.
  • Knowledge bases are important resources for a variety of natural language processing tasks but suffer from incompleteness. We propose a novel embedding model, \emph{ITransF}, to perform knowledge base completion. Equipped with a sparse attention mechanism, ITransF discovers hidden concepts of relations and transfer statistical strength through the sharing of concepts. Moreover, the learned associations between relations and concepts, which are represented by sparse attention vectors, can be interpreted easily. We evaluate ITransF on two benchmark datasets---WN18 and FB15k for knowledge base completion and obtains improvements on both the mean rank and Hits@10 metrics, over all baselines that do not use additional information.
  • Dropout, a simple and effective way to train deep neural networks, has led to a number of impressive empirical successes and spawned many recent theoretical investigations. However, the gap between dropout's training and inference phases, introduced due to tractability considerations, has largely remained under-appreciated. In this work, we first formulate dropout as a tractable approximation of some latent variable model, leading to a clean view of parameter sharing and enabling further theoretical analysis. Then, we introduce (approximate) expectation-linear dropout neural networks, whose inference gap we are able to formally characterize. Algorithmically, we show that our proposed measure of the inference gap can be used to regularize the standard dropout training objective, resulting in an \emph{explicit} control of the gap. Our method is as simple and efficient as standard dropout. We further prove the upper bounds on the loss in accuracy due to expectation-linearization, describe classes of input distributions that expectation-linearize easily. Experiments on three image classification benchmark datasets demonstrate that reducing the inference gap can indeed improve the performance consistently.
  • State-of-the-art sequence labeling systems traditionally require large amounts of task-specific knowledge in the form of hand-crafted features and data pre-processing. In this paper, we introduce a novel neutral network architecture that benefits from both word- and character-level representations automatically, by using combination of bidirectional LSTM, CNN and CRF. Our system is truly end-to-end, requiring no feature engineering or data pre-processing, thus making it applicable to a wide range of sequence labeling tasks. We evaluate our system on two data sets for two sequence labeling tasks --- Penn Treebank WSJ corpus for part-of-speech (POS) tagging and CoNLL 2003 corpus for named entity recognition (NER). We obtain state-of-the-art performance on both the two data --- 97.55\% accuracy for POS tagging and 91.21\% F1 for NER.
  • Coreference resolution is one of the first stages in deep language understanding and its importance has been well recognized in the natural language processing community. In this paper, we propose a generative, unsupervised ranking model for entity coreference resolution by introducing resolution mode variables. Our unsupervised system achieves 58.44% F1 score of the CoNLL metric on the English data from the CoNLL-2012 shared task (Pradhan et al., 2012), outperforming the Stanford deterministic system (Lee et al., 2013) by 3.01%.
  • This paper presents generalized probabilistic models for high-order projective dependency parsing and an algorithmic framework for learning these statistical models involving dependency trees. Partition functions and marginals for high-order dependency trees can be computed efficiently, by adapting our algorithms which extend the inside-outside algorithm to higher-order cases. To show the effectiveness of our algorithms, we perform experiments on three languages---English, Chinese and Czech, using maximum conditional likelihood estimation for model training and L-BFGS for parameter estimation. Our methods achieve competitive performance for English, and outperform all previously reported dependency parsers for Chinese and Czech.