• With the advancement of treatment modalities in radiation therapy for cancer patients, outcomes have improved, but at the cost of increased treatment plan complexity and planning time. The accurate prediction of dose distributions would alleviate this issue by guiding clinical plan optimization to save time and maintain high quality plans. We have modified a convolutional deep network model, U-net (originally designed for segmentation purposes), for predicting dose from patient image contours of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR). We show that, as an example, we are able to accurately predict the dose of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients, where the average Dice similarity coefficient is 0.91 when comparing the predicted vs. true isodose volumes between 0% and 100% of the prescription dose. The average value of the absolute differences in [max, mean] dose is found to be under 5% of the prescription dose, specifically for each structure is [1.80%, 1.03%](PTV), [1.94%, 4.22%](Bladder), [1.80%, 0.48%](Body), [3.87%, 1.79%](L Femoral Head), [5.07%, 2.55%](R Femoral Head), and [1.26%, 1.62%](Rectum) of the prescription dose. We thus managed to map a desired radiation dose distribution from a patient's PTV and OAR contours. As an additional advantage, relatively little data was used in the techniques and models described in this paper.
  • Charge transfer and electron-phonon coupling (EPC) are proposed to be two important constituents associated with enhanced superconductivity in the single unit cell FeSe films on oxide surfaces. Using high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations, we have explored the lattice dynamics of ultrathin FeSe films grown on SrTiO3. We show that, despite the significant effect from the substrate on the electronic structure and superconductivity of the system, the FeSe phonons in the films are unaffected. The energy dispersion and linewidth associated with the Fe- and Se-derived vibrational modes are thickness- and temperature-independent. Theoretical calculations indicate the crucial role of antiferromagnetic correlation in FeSe to reproduce the experimental phonon dispersion. Importantly, the only detectable change due to the growth of FeSe films is the broadening of the Fuchs-Kliewer (F-K) phonons associated with the lattice vibrations of SrTiO$_3$(001) substrate. If EPC plays any role in the enhancement of film superconductivity, it must be the interfacial coupling between the electrons in FeSe film and the F-K phonons from substrate rather than the phonons of FeSe.
  • Plasmons, the collective excitations of electrons in the bulk or at the surface, play an important role in the properties of materials, and have generated the field of Plasmonics. We report the observation of a highly unusual acoustic plasmon mode on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), Bi2Se3, using momentum resolved inelastic electron scattering. In sharp contrast to ordinary plasmon modes, this mode exhibits almost linear dispersion into the second Brillouin zone and remains prominent with remarkably weak damping not seen in any other systems. This behavior must be associated with the inherent robustness of the electrons in the TI surface state, so that not only the surface Dirac states but also their collective excitations are topologically protected. On the other hand, this mode has much smaller energy dispersion than expected from a continuous media excitation picture, which can be attributed to the strong coupling with surface phonons.
  • We systematically investigated the superstructure evolution of Te atoms on Au(111) substrate at different coverages. As revealed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, Te atoms form one-dimensional root3 R30{\deg} chains near 0.10 monolayer (ML). Two two-dimensional chiral structures, (root111*root111)R4.7{\deg} and (3root21*3root21)R10.9{\deg}, can be formed and their stability can be tuned by slightly adjusting the Te coverge near 1/3 ML. A honeycomb-like superstructure is observed by further increasing the coverage to 4/9 ML. An interfacial state emerges at ~-0.65 eV due to Te adsorption on Au(111). The formation of these Te-induced high-order superstructures is accompanied by relaxation of gold atoms in the surface layer, indicating the strong Te-Au interaction.
  • The significant role of interfacial coupling on the superconductivity enhancement in FeSe films on SrTiO3 has been widely recognized. But the explicit origination of this coupling is yet to be identified. Here by surface phonon measurements using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, we found electric field generated by Fuchs-Kliewer (F-K) phonon modes of SrTiO3 can penetrate into FeSe films and strongly interact with electrons therein. The mode-specific electron-phonon coupling (EPC) constant for the ~92 meV F-K phonon is ~0.25 in the single-layer FeSe on SrTiO3. With increasing FeSe thickness, the penetrating field intensity decays exponentially, which matches well the observed exponential decay of the superconducting gap. It is unambiguously shown that the SrTiO3 F-K phonon penetrating into FeSe is essential in the interfacial superconductivity enhancement.
  • VMAT optimization is a computationally challenging problem due to its large data size, high degrees of freedom, and many hardware constraints. High-performance graphics processing units have been used to speed up the computations. However, its small memory size cannot handle cases with a large dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix. This paper is to report an implementation of our column-generation based VMAT algorithm on a multi-GPU platform to solve the memory limitation problem. The column-generation approach generates apertures sequentially by solving a pricing problem (PP) and a master problem (MP) iteratively. The DDC matrix is split into four sub-matrices according to beam angles, stored on four GPUs in compressed sparse row format. Computation of beamlet price is accomplished using multi-GPU. While the remaining steps of PP and MP problems are implemented on a single GPU due to their modest computational loads. A H&N patient case was used to validate our method. We compare our multi-GPU implementation with three single GPU implementation strategies: truncating DDC matrix (S1), repeatedly transferring DDC matrix between CPU and GPU (S2), and porting computations involving DDC matrix to CPU (S3). Two more H&N patient cases and three prostate cases were also used to demonstrate the advantages of our method. Our multi-GPU implementation can finish the optimization within ~1 minute for the H&N patient case. S1 leads to an inferior plan quality although its total time was 10 seconds shorter than the multi-GPU implementation. S2 and S3 yield same plan quality as the multi-GPU implementation but take ~4 minutes and ~6 minutes, respectively. High computational efficiency was consistently achieved for the other 5 cases. The results demonstrate that the multi-GPU implementation can handle the large-scale VMAT optimization problem efficiently without sacrificing plan quality.
  • Monte Carlo (MC) method has been recognized the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, its extremely long computation time impedes clinical applications. Recently, a lot of efforts have been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on GPUs. Nonetheless, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines were developed in NVidia CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a fast cross-platform MC dose engine oclMC using OpenCL environment for external beam photon and electron radiotherapy in MeV energy range. Coupled photon-electron MC simulation was implemented with analogue simulations for photon transports and a Class II condensed history scheme for electron transports. To test the accuracy and efficiency of our dose engine oclMC, we compared dose calculation results of oclMC and gDPM, our previously developed GPU-based MC code, for a 15 MeV electron beam and a 6 MV photon beam on a homogenous water phantom, one slab phantom and one half-slab phantom. Satisfactory agreement was observed in all the cases. The average dose differences within 10% isodose line of the maximum dose were 0.48-0.53% for the electron beam cases and 0.15-0.17% for the photon beam cases. In terms of efficiency, our dose engine oclMC was 6-17% slower than gDPM when running both codes on the same NVidia TITAN card due to both different physics particle transport models and different computational environments between CUDA and OpenCL. The cross-platform portability was also validated by successfully running our new dose engine on a set of different compute devices including an Nvidia GPU card, two AMD GPU cards and an Intel CPU card using one or four cores. Computational efficiency among these platforms was compared.
  • Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered as the most accurate method for radiation dose calculations. Accuracy of a source model for a linear accelerator is critical for the overall dose calculation accuracy. In this paper, we presented an analytical source model that we recently developed for GPU-based MC dose calculations. A key concept called phase-space-ring (PSR) was proposed. It contained a group of particles that are of the same type and close in energy and radial distance to the center of the phase-space plane. The model parameterized probability densities of particle location, direction and energy for each primary photon PSR, scattered photon PSR and electron PSR. For a primary photon PSRs, the particle direction is assumed to be from the beam spot. A finite spot size is modeled with a 2D Gaussian distribution. For a scattered photon PSR, multiple Gaussian components were used to model the particle direction. The direction distribution of an electron PSRs was also modeled as a 2D Gaussian distribution with a large standard deviation. We also developed a method to analyze a phase-space file and derive corresponding model parameters. To test the accuracy of our linac source model, dose distributions of different open fields in a water phantom were calculated using our source model and compared to those directly calculated using the reference phase-space file. The average distance-to-agreement (DTA) was within 1 mm for the depth dose in the build-up region and beam penumbra regions. The root-mean-square (RMS) dose difference was within 1.1% for dose profiles at inner and outer beam regions. The maximal relative difference of output factors was within 0.5%. Good agreements were also found in an IMRT prostate patient case and an IMRT head-and-neck case. These results demonstrated the efficacy of our source model in terms of accurately representing a reference phase-space file.
  • We recently built an analytical source model for GPU-based MC dose engine. In this paper, we present a sampling strategy to efficiently utilize this source model in GPU-based dose calculation. Our source model was based on a concept of phase-space-ring (PSR). This ring structure makes it effective to account for beam rotational symmetry, but not suitable for dose calculations due to rectangular jaw settings. Hence, we first convert PSR source model to its phase-space let (PSL) representation. Then in dose calculation, different types of sub-sources were separately sampled. Source sampling and particle transport were iterated. So that the particles being sampled and transported simultaneously are of same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergence. We also present an automatic commissioning approach to adjust the model for a good representation of a clinical linear accelerator . Weighting factors were introduced to adjust relative weights of PSRs, determined by solving a quadratic minimization problem with a non-negativity constraint. We tested the efficiency gain of our model over a previous source model using PSL files. The efficiency was improved by 1.70 ~ 4.41, due to the avoidance of long data reading and transferring. The commissioning problem can be solved in ~20 sec. Its efficacy was tested by comparing the doses computed using the commissioned model and the uncommissioned one, with measurements in different open fields in a water phantom under a clinical Varian Truebeam 6MV beam. For the depth dose curves, the average distance-to-agreement was improved from 0.04~0.28 cm to 0.04~0.12 cm for build-up region and the root-mean-square (RMS) dose difference after build-up region was reduced from 0.32%~0.67% to 0.21%~0.48%. For lateral dose profiles, RMS difference was reduced from 0.31%~2.0% to 0.06%~0.78% at inner beam and from 0.20%~1.25% to 0.10%~0.51% at outer beam.
  • In this paper, we present a new method to generate an instantaneous volumetric image using a single x-ray projection. To fully extract motion information hidden in projection images, we partitioned a projection image into small patches. We utilized a sparse learning method to automatically select patches that have a high correlation with principal component analysis (PCA) coefficients of a lung motion model. A model that maps the patch intensity to the PCA coefficients is built along with the patch selection process. Based on this model, a measured projection can be used to predict the PCA coefficients, which are further used to generate a motion vector field and hence a volumetric image. We have also proposed an intensity baseline correction method based on the partitioned projection, where the first and the second moments of pixel intensities at a patch in a simulated image are matched with those in a measured image via a linear transformation. The proposed method has been valid in simulated data and real phantom data. The algorithm is able to identify patches that contain relevant motion information, e.g. diaphragm region. It is found that intensity correction step is important to remove the systematic error in the motion prediction. For the simulation case, the sparse learning model reduced prediction error for the first PCA coefficient to 5%, compared to the 10% error when sparse learning is not used. 95th percentile error for the predicted motion vector is reduced from 2.40 mm to 0.92mm. In the phantom case, the predicted tumor motion trajectory is successfully reconstructed with 0.82 mm mean vector field error compared to 1.66 mm error without using the sparse learning method. The algorithm robustness with respect to sparse level, patch size, and existence of diaphragm, as well as computation time, has also been studied.
  • Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are 1) to commission a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and 2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. 25 brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is found that the mean dose value to an organ varies largely among patients. Moreover, dose distribution is highly non-homogeneous inside an organ. The maximum dose is found to be 1~3 times higher than the mean dose depending on the organ, and is up to 8 times higher for the entire body due to the very high dose region in bony structures. High computational efficiency has also been observed in our studies, such that MC dose calculation time is less than 5 min for a typical case.
  • A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel strategy to pre-process patient-independent phase-spaces and bin particles by type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4x4, 10x10 and 30x30 cm2 in water resulted in gamma passing rates of 99.96%, 99.92% and 98.66%, respectively. Relative output factors agreed within 1%. An IMRT patient plan using the PSL method resulted in a passing rate of 97%, and was calculated in 50 seconds using a single GPU compared to 8.4 hours (per CPU) for BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc.
  • In the treatment plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix is often pre-computed to parameterize the dose contribution to each voxel in the volume of interest from each beamlet of unit intensity. However, due to the limitation of computer memory and the requirement on computational efficiency, in practice matrix elements of small values are usually truncated, which inevitably compromises the quality of the resulting plan. A fixed-point iteration scheme has been applied in IMRT optimization to solve this problem, which has been reported to be effective and efficient based on the observations of the numerical experiments. In this paper, we aim to point out the mathematics behind this scheme and to answer the following three questions: 1) whether the fixed-point iteration algorithm converges or not? 2) when it converges, whether the fixed point solution is same as the original solution obtained with the complete DDC matrix? 3) if not the same, whether the fixed point solution is more accurate than the naive solution of the truncated problem obtained without the fixed-point iteration? To answer these questions, we first performed mathematical analysis and deductions using a simplified fluence map optimization (FMO) model. Then we conducted numerical experiments on a head-and-neck patient case using both the simplified and the original FMO model. Both our mathematical analysis and numerical experiments demonstrate that with proper DDC matrix truncation, the fixed-point iteration can converge. Even though the converged solution is not the one that we obtain with the complete DDC matrix, the fixed-point iteration scheme could significantly improve the plan accuracy compared with the solution to the truncated problem obtained without the fixed-point iteration.
  • The gamma-index test has been commonly adopted to quantify the degree of agreement between a reference dose distribution and an evaluation dose distribution. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been widely used for the radiotherapy dose calculation for both clinical and research purposes. The goal of this work is to investigate both theoretically and experimentally the impact of the MC statistical fluctuation on the gamma-index test when the fluctuation exists in the reference, the evaluation, or both dose distributions. To the first order approximation, we theoretically demonstrated in a simplified model that the statistical fluctuation tends to overestimate gamma-index values when existing in the reference dose distribution and underestimate gamma-index values when existing in the evaluation dose distribution given the original gamma-index is relatively large for the statistical fluctuation. Our numerical experiments using clinical photon radiation therapy cases have shown that 1) when performing a gamma-index test between an MC reference dose and a non-MC evaluation dose, the average gamma-index is overestimated and the passing rate decreases with the increase of the noise level in the reference dose; 2) when performing a gamma-index test between a non-MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the average gamma-index is underestimated when they are within the clinically relevant range and the passing rate increases with the increase of the noise level in the evaluation dose; 3) when performing a gamma-index test between an MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the passing rate is overestimated due to the noise in the evaluation dose and underestimated due to the noise in the reference dose. We conclude that the gamma-index test should be used with caution when comparing dose distributions computed with Monte Carlo simulation.
  • In adaptive radiotherapy, deformable image registration is often conducted between the planning CT and treatment CT (or cone beam CT) to generate a deformation vector field (DVF) for dose accumulation and contour propagation. The auto propagated contours on the treatment CT may contain relatively large errors, especially in low contrast regions. A clinician inspection and editing of the propagated contours are frequently needed. The edited contours are able to meet the clinical requirement for adaptive therapy; however, the DVF is still inaccurate and inconsistent with the edited contours. The purpose of this work is to develop a contour-guided deformable image registration (CG-DIR) algorithm to improve the accuracy and consistency of the DVF for adaptive radiotherapy. Incorporation of the edited contours into the registration algorithm is realized by regularizing the objective function of the original demons algorithm with a term of intensity matching between the delineated structures set pairs. The CG-DIR algorithm is implemented on computer graphics processing units (GPUs) by following the original GPU-based demons algorithm computation framework [Gu et al, Phys Med Biol. 55(1): 207-219, 2010]. The performance of CG-DIR is evaluated on five clinical head-and-neck and one pelvic cancer patient data. It is found that compared with the original demons, CG-DIR improves the accuracy and consistency of the DVF, while retaining similar high computational efficiency.
  • Patient respiratory signal associated with the cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is important for lung cancer radiotherapy. In contrast to monitoring an external surrogate of respiration, such signal can be extracted directly from the CBCT projections. In this paper, we propose a novel local principle component analysis (LPCA) method to extract the respiratory signal by distinguishing the respiration motion-induced content change from the gantry rotation-induced content change in the CBCT projections. The LPCA method is evaluated by comparing with three state-of-the-art projection-based methods, namely, the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) method, the intensity analysis (IA) method, and the Fourier-transform based phase analysis (FT-p) method. The clinical CBCT projection data of eight patients, acquired under various clinical scenarios, were used to investigate the performance of each method. We found that the proposed LPCA method has demonstrated the best overall performance for cases tested and thus is a promising technique for extracting respiratory signal. We also identified the applicability of each existing method.
  • In a treatment plan optimization problem for radiotherapy, a clinically acceptable plan is usually generated by an optimization process with weighting factors or reference doses adjusted for organs. Recent discoveries indicate that adjusting parameters associated with each voxel may lead to better plan quality. However, it is still unclear regarding the mathematical reasons behind it. To answer questions related to this problem, we establish in this work a new mathematical framework equipped with two theorems. The new framework clarifies the different consequences of adjusting organ-dependent and voxel-dependent parameters for the treatment plan optimization of radiation therapy, as well as the different effects of adjusting weighting factors versus reference doses in the optimization process. The main discoveries are threefold: 1) While in the organ-based model the selection of the objective function has an impact on the quality of the optimized plans, this is no longer an issue for the voxel-based model since the entire Pareto surface could be generated regardless the specific form of the objective function as long as it satisfies certain mathematical conditions; 2) A larger Pareto surface is explored by adjusting voxel-dependent parameters than by adjusting organ-dependent parameters, possibly allowing for the generation of plans with better trade-offs among different clinical objectives; 3) Adjusting voxel weighting factors is preferred to adjusting the voxel reference doses since the Pareto optimality can be maintained.
  • Simulation of x-ray projection images plays an important role in cone beam CT (CBCT) related research projects. A projection image contains primary signal, scatter signal, and noise. It is computationally demanding to perform accurate and realistic computations for all of these components. In this work, we develop a package on GPU, called gDRR, for the accurate and efficient computations of x-ray projection images in CBCT under clinically realistic conditions. The primary signal is computed by a tri-linear ray-tracing algorithm. A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is then performed, yielding the primary signal and the scatter signal, both with noise. A denoising process is applied to obtain a smooth scatter signal. The noise component is then obtained by combining the difference between the MC primary and the ray-tracing primary signals, and the difference between the MC simulated scatter and the denoised scatter signals. Finally, a calibration step converts the calculated noise signal into a realistic one by scaling its amplitude. For a typical CBCT projection with a poly-energetic spectrum, the calculation time for the primary signal is 1.2~2.3 sec, while the MC simulations take 28.1~95.3 sec. Computation time for all other steps is negligible. The ray-tracing primary signal matches well with the primary part of the MC simulation result. The MC simulated scatter signal using gDRR is in agreement with EGSnrc results with a relative difference of 3.8%. A noise calibration process is conducted to calibrate gDRR against a real CBCT scanner. The calculated projections are accurate and realistic, such that beam-hardening artifacts and scatter artifacts can be reproduced using the simulated projections. The noise amplitudes in the CBCT images reconstructed from the simulated projections also agree with those in the measured images at corresponding mAs levels.
  • Computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. Current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as demons, may fail in the context of CT-CBCT DIR because of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities. In this paper, we propose a variant of demons, called Deformation with Intensity Simultaneously Corrected (DISC), to deal with CT-CBCT DIR. DISC distinguishes itself from the original demons algorithm by performing an adaptive intensity correction step on the CBCT image at every iteration step of the demons registration. Specifically, the intensity correction of a voxel in CBCT is achieved by matching the first and the second moments of the voxel intensities inside a patch around the voxel with those on the CT image. It is expected that such a strategy can remove artifacts in the CBCT image, as well as ensuring the intensity consistency between the two modalities. DISC is implemented on computer graphics processing units (GPUs) in compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming environment. The performance of DISC is evaluated on a simulated patient case and six clinical head-and-neck cancer patient data. It is found that DISC is robust against the CBCT artifacts and intensity inconsistency and significantly improves the registration accuracy when compared with the original demons.
  • Using fiducial markers on patient's body surface to predict the tumor location is a widely used approach in lung cancer radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to propose an algorithm that automatically identifies a sparse set of locations on the patient's surface with the optimal prediction power for the tumor motion. The sparse selection of markers on the external surface and the assumed linear relationship between the marker motion and the internal tumor motion are represented by a prediction matrix. Such a matrix is determined by solving an optimization problem, where the objective function contains a sparsity term that penalizes the number of markers chosen on the patient's surface. The performance of our algorithm has been tested on realistic clinical data of four lung cancer patients. Thoracic 4DCT scans with 10 phases are used for the study. On a reference phase, a grid of points are casted on the patient's surface (except for patient's back) and propagated to other phases via deformable image registration of the corresponding CT images. Tumor locations at each phase are also manually delineated. We use 9 out of 10 phases of the 4DCT images to identify a small group of surface markers that are most correlated with the motion of the tumor, and find the prediction matrix at the same time. The 10th phase is then used to test the accuracy of the prediction. It is found that on average 6 to 7 surface markers are necessary to predict tumor locations with a 3D error of about 1mm. In addition, the selected marker locations lie closely in those areas where surface point motion has a high correlation with the tumor motion. Our method can automatically select sparse locations on patient's external surface and estimate a correlation matrix based on 4DCT, so that the selected surface locations can be used to place fiducial markers to optimally predict internal tumor motions.
  • Respiration-correlated CBCT, commonly called 4DCBCT, provide respiratory phase-resolved CBCT images. In many clinical applications, it is more preferable to reconstruct true 4DCBCT with the 4th dimension being time, i.e., each CBCT image is reconstructed based on the corresponding instantaneous projection. We propose in this work a novel algorithm for the reconstruction of this truly time-resolved CBCT, called cine-CBCT, by effectively utilizing the underlying temporal coherence, such as periodicity or repetition, in those cine-CBCT images. Assuming each column of the matrix $\bm{U}$ represents a CBCT image to be reconstructed and the total number of columns is the same as the number of projections, the central idea of our algorithm is that the rank of $\bm{U}$ is much smaller than the number of projections and we can use a matrix factorization form $\bm{U}=\bm{L}\bm{R}$ for $\bm{U}$. The number of columns for the matrix $\bm{L}$ constraints the rank of $\bm{U}$ and hence implicitly imposing a temporal coherence condition among all the images in cine-CBCT. The desired image properties in $\bm{L}$ and the periodicity of the breathing pattern are achieved by penalizing the sparsity of the tight wavelet frame transform of $\bm{L}$ and that of the Fourier transform of $\bm{R}$, respectively. A split Bregman method is used to solve the problem. In this paper we focus on presenting this new algorithm and showing the proof of principle using simulation studies on an NCAT phantom.
  • While compressed sensing (CS) based reconstructions have been developed for low-dose CBCT, a clear understanding on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot image quality and imaging dose together as functions of number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. A clear understanding on the tradeoff between image quality and dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed for various imaging tasks in IGRT. Main findings of this work include: 1) Under the CS framework, image quality has little degradation over a large dose range, and the degradation becomes evident when the dose < 100 total mAs. A dose < 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40-100 total mAs, depending on the specific IGRT applications. 2) Among different scan protocols at a constant low-dose level, the super sparse-view reconstruction with projection number less than 50 is the most challenging case, even with strong regularization. Better image quality can be acquired with other low mAs protocols. 3) The optimal scan protocol is the combination of a medium number of projections and a medium level of mAs/view. This is more evident when the dose is around 72.8 total mAs or below and when the ROI is a low-contrast or high-resolution object. Based on our results, the optimal number of projections is around 90 to 120. 4) The clinically acceptable lowest dose level is task dependent. In our study, 72.8mAs is a safe dose level for visualizing low-contrast objects, while 12.2 total mAs is sufficient for detecting high-contrast objects of diameter greater than 3 mm.
  • Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography (4D-CBCT) has been developed to provide respiratory phase resolved volumetric imaging in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Inadequate number of projections in each phase bin results in low quality 4D-CBCT images with obvious streaking artifacts. In this work, we propose two novel 4D-CBCT algorithms: an iterative reconstruction algorithm and an enhancement algorithm, utilizing a temporal nonlocal means (TNLM) method. We define a TNLM energy term for a given set of 4D-CBCT images. Minimization of this term favors those 4D-CBCT images such that any anatomical features at one spatial point at one phase can be found in a nearby spatial point at neighboring phases. 4D-CBCT reconstruction is achieved by minimizing a total energy containing a data fidelity term and the TNLM energy term. As for the image enhancement, 4D-CBCT images generated by the FDK algorithm are enhanced by minimizing the TNLM function while keeping the enhanced images close to the FDK results. A forward-backward splitting algorithm and a Gauss-Jacobi iteration method are employed to solve the problems. The algorithms are implemented on GPU to achieve a high computational efficiency. The reconstruction algorithm and the enhancement algorithm generate visually similar 4D-CBCT images, both better than the FDK results. Quantitative evaluations indicate that, compared with the FDK results, our reconstruction method improves contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) by a factor of 2.56~3.13 and our enhancement method increases the CNR by 2.75~3.33 times. The enhancement method also removes over 80% of the streak artifacts from the FDK results. The total computation time is ~460 sec for the reconstruction algorithm and ~610 sec for the enhancement algorithm on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card.
  • Recently, X-ray imaging dose from computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans has become a serious concern. Patient-specific imaging dose calculation has been proposed for the purpose of dose management. While Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation can be quite accurate for this purpose, it suffers from low computational efficiency. In response to this problem, we have successfully developed a MC dose calculation package, gCTD, on GPU architecture under the NVIDIA CUDA platform for fast and accurate estimation of the x-ray imaging dose received by a patient during a CT or CBCT scan. Techniques have been developed particularly for the GPU architecture to achieve high computational efficiency. Dose calculations using CBCT scanning geometry in a homogeneous water phantom and a heterogeneous Zubal head phantom have shown good agreement between gCTD and EGSnrc, indicating the accuracy of our code. In terms of improved efficiency, it is found that gCTD attains a speed-up of ~400 times in the homogeneous water phantom and ~76.6 times in the Zubal phantom compared to EGSnrc. As for absolute computation time, imaging dose calculation for the Zubal phantom can be accomplished in ~17 sec with the average relative standard deviation of 0.4%. Though our gCTD code has been developed and tested in the context of CBCT scans, with simple modification of geometry it can be used for assessing imaging dose in CT scans as well.
  • Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is commonly considered to be the most accurate dose calculation method in radiotherapy. However, its efficiency still requires improvement for many routine clinical applications. In this paper, we present our recent progress towards the development a GPU-based MC dose calculation package, gDPM v2.0. It utilizes the parallel computation ability of a GPU to achieve high efficiency, while maintaining the same particle transport physics as in the original DPM code and hence the same level of simulation accuracy. In GPU computing, divergence of execution paths between threads can considerably reduce the efficiency. Since photons and electrons undergo different physics and hence attain different execution paths, we use a simulation scheme where photon transport and electron transport are separated to partially relieve the thread divergence issue. High performance random number generator and hardware linear interpolation are also utilized. We have also developed various components to handle fluence map and linac geometry, so that gDPM can be used to compute dose distributions for realistic IMRT or VMAT treatment plans. Our gDPM package is tested for its accuracy and efficiency in both phantoms and realistic patient cases. In all cases, the average relative uncertainties are less than 1%. A statistical t-test is performed and the dose difference between the CPU and the GPU results is found not statistically significant in over 96% of the high dose region and over 97% of the entire region. Speed up factors of 69.1 ~ 87.2 have been observed using an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card against a 2.27GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. For realistic IMRT and VMAT plans, MC dose calculation can be completed with less than 1% standard deviation in 36.1~39.6 sec using gDPM.