• Recently, GRB 170817A was confirmed to be associated with GW 170817, which was produced by a neutron star - neutron star merger. It indicates that at least some short gamma-ray bursts come from binary neutron star mergers. Theoretically, it is widely accepted that short gamma-ray bursts can be produced by two distinctly different mechanisms, binary neutron star mergers and neutron star - black hole mergers. These two kinds of bursts should be different observationally due to their different trigger mechanisms. Motivated by this idea, we collect a universal data set constituted of 51 short gamma-ray bursts observed by $Swift$/BAT, among which 14 events have extended emission component. We study the observational features of these 51 events statistically. It is found that our samples are consisted of two distinct groups. They clearly show a bimodal distribution when their peak photon fluxes at 15-150 keV band are plotted against the corresponding fluences. Most interestingly, all the 14 short bursts with extended emission lie in a particular region. When the fluences are plotted against the burst durations, short bursts with extended emission again tend to concentrate in the long duration segment. These features strongly indicate that short gamma-ray bursts really may come from two distinct types of progenitors. We argue that those short gamma-ray bursts with extended emission come from the coalescence of neutron stars, while the short gamma-ray bursts without extended emission come from neutron star - black hole mergers.
  • Using multi-wavelength observations of radio afterglows, we confirm the hypothesis that flux density of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) will become invariable as the GRBs locate far enough, that is to say the detection rate will be approximately independent of redshift. It is found that short and SN-associated GRBs marginally match the flux-redshift relationship in nearby universe and they could be outliers. We study this novel behavior theoretically and find that it can be well explained by the standard forward shock model involving a thin shell in both ISM and wind circumstances. A potential relation of medium density with redshift, namely $n\propto(1+z)^4$, has been ruled out according to the current measurements of $n$ and $z$ for short and long GRBs. In addition, the possible dependence of host flux on the redshift is also investigated. We discover the similar flux-redshift independence as well, which implies the detection rate of radio hosts might be also independent of the redshift. For the first time, we constrain the spectral index $\beta_h$ in $F_{\nu, h}\propto\nu^{\beta_h}$ of radio hosts statistically and obtain $\beta_h\sim2$ for the brighter hosts and $\beta_h<1$ for the dimmer ones, hinting two types of radio hosts. Finally, we predict the detection rates of radio afterglows by next-generation radio telescopes such as FAST, LOFAR, MeerKAT, ASKAP and SKA.
  • The true ground state of hadronic matter may be strange quark matter (SQM). Consequently, the observed pulsars may actually be strange quark stars, but not neutron stars. However, proving or disproving the SQM hypothesis still remains to be a difficult problem, due to the similarity between the macroscopical characteristics of strange quark stars and neutron stars. Here we propose a hopeful method to probe the existence of strange quark matter. In the frame work of the SQM hypothesis, strange quark dwarfs and even strange quark planets can also stably exist. Noting that SQM planets will not be tidally disrupted even when they get very close to their host stars due to their extreme compactness, we argue that we could identify SQM planets by searching for very close-in planets among extrasolar planetary systems. Especially, we should keep our eyes on possible pulsar planets with orbital radius less than $\sim 5.6 \times 10^{10}$~cm and period less than $\sim 6100$~s. A thorough search in the currently detected $\sim 2950$ exoplanets around normal main sequence stars has failed to identify any stable close-in objects that meet the SQM criteria, i.e. lying in the tidal disruption region for normal matter planets. However, the pulsar planet PSR J1719-1438B, with an orbital radius of $\sim 6 \times 10^{10}$~cm and orbital period of $7837$~s, is encouragingly found to be a good candidate.
  • Very recently Spitler et al. (2016) and Scholz et al. (2016) reported their detections of sixteen additional bright bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is inconsistent with all the catastrophic event models put forward previously for hypothetically non-repeating FRBs. Here we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from such a pulsar encountering lots of asteroids in the belt. During each pulsar-asteroid impact, an electric field induced outside the asteroid has such a large component parallel to the stellar magnetic field that electrons are torn off the asteroidal surface and accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies instantaneously. Subsequent movement of these electrons along magnetic field lines will cause coherent curvature radiation, which can account for all the properties of an FRB. In addition, this model can self-consistently explain the typical duration, luminosity, and repetitive rate of the seventeen bursts of FRB 121102. The predicted occurrence rate of repeating FRB sources may imply that our model would be testable in the next few years.
  • Optical re-brightenings in the afterglows of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are unexpected within the framework of the simple external shock model. While it has been suggested that the central engines of some GRBs are newly born magnetars, we aim to relate the behaviors of magnetars to the optical re-brightenings. A newly born magnetar will lose its rotational energy in the form of Poynting-flux, which may be converted into a wind of electron-positron pairs through some magnetic dissipation processes. As proposed by Dai (2004), this wind will catch up with the GRB outflow and a long-lasting reverse shock would form. By applying this scenario to GRB afterglows, we find that the reverse shock propagating back into the electron-positron wind can lead to an observable optical re-brightening and a simultaneous X-ray plateau (or X-ray shallow decay). In our study, we select four GRBs, i.e., GRB 080413B, GRB 090426, GRB 091029, and GRB 100814A, of which the optical afterglows are well observed and show clear re-brightenings. We find that they can be well interpreted. In our scenario, the spin-down timescale of the magnetar should be slightly smaller than the peak time of the re-brightening, which can provide a clue to the characteristics of the magnetar.
  • The X-ray afterglow of GRB 130831A shows an "internal plateau" with a decay slope of $\sim$ 0.8, followed by a steep drop at around $10^5$ s with a slope of $\sim$ 6. After the drop, the X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical afterglow exhibits two segments of plateaus separated by a luminous optical flare, followed by a normal decay with a slope basically consistent with that of the late-time X-ray afterglow. The decay of the internal X-ray plateau is much steeper than what we expect in the simplest magnetar model. We propose a scenario in which the magnetar undergoes gravitational-wave-driven r-mode instability, and the spin-down is dominated by gravitational wave losses up to the end of the steep plateau, so that such a relatively steep plateau can be interpreted as the internal emission of the magnetar wind and the sharp drop can be produced when the magnetar collapses into a black hole. This scenario also predicts an initial X-ray plateau lasting for hundreds of seconds with an approximately constant flux which is compatible with observation. Assuming that the magnetar wind has a negligible contribution in the optical band, we interpret the optical afterglow as the forward shock emission by invoking the energy injection from a continuously refreshed shock following the prompt emission phase. It is shown that our model can basically describe the temporal evolution of the multi-band afterglow of GRB 130831A.
  • The detection of optical re-brightenings and X-ray plateaus in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) challenges the generic external shock model. Recently, we have developed a numerical method to calculate the dynamic of the system consisting of a forward shock and a reverse shock. Here, we briefly review the applications of this method in the afterglow theory. By relating these diverse features to the central engines of GRBs, we find that the steep optical re-brightenings would be caused by the fall-back accretion of black holes, while the shallow optical re-brightenings are the consequence of the injection of the electron-positron-pair wind from the central magnetar. These studies provide useful ways to probe the characteristics of GRB central engines.
  • The shallow decay phase and flares in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is widely believed to be associated with the later activation of central engine. Some models of energy injection involve with a continuous energy flow since the GRB trigger time, such as the magnetic dipole radiation from a magnetar. However, in the scenario involving with a black hole accretion system, the energy flow from the fall-back accretion may be delayed for a fall-back time $\sim t_{\rm fb}$. Thus we propose a delayed energy injection model, the delayed energy would cause a notable rise to the Lorentz factor of the external shock, which will "generate" a bump in the multiple band afterglows. If the delayed time is very short, our model degenerates to the previous models. Our model can well explain the significant re-brightening in the optical and infrared light curves of GRB 081029 and GRB 100621A. A considerable fall-back mass is needed to provide the later energy, this indicates GRBs accompanied with fall-back material may be associated with a low energy supernova so that fraction of the envelope can be survived during eruption. The fall-back time can give meaningful information of the properties of GRB progenitor stars.
  • It was found by Amati et al. in 2002 that for a small sample of 9 gamma-ray bursts, more distant events appear to be systematically harder in the soft gamma-ray band. Here, we have collected a larger sample of 65 gamma-ray bursts, whose time integrated spectra are well established and can be well fitted with the so called Band function. It is confirmed that a correlation between the redshifts ($z$) and the low-energy indices ($\alpha$) of the Band function does exist, though it is a bit more scattered than the result of Amati et al. This correlation can not be simply attributed to the effect of photon reddening. Furthermore, correlations between $\alpha$ and $E_{\rm peak}$ (the peak energy in the $\nu F_{\nu}$ spectrum in the rest frame), $\alpha$ and $E_{\rm iso}$ (the isotropic energy release), $\alpha$ and $L_{\rm iso}$ (the isotropic luminosity) are also found, which indicate that these parameters are somehow connected. The results may give useful constraints on the physics of gamma-ray bursts.
  • As a new kind of radio transient sources detected at $\sim 1.4$ GHz, fast radio bursts are specially characterized by their short durations and high intensities. Although only ten events are detected so far, fast radio bursts may actually frequently happen at a rate of $\sim 10^{3}$ --- $10^4~\rm{sky}^{-1}~\rm{day}^{-1}$. We suggest that fast radio bursts can be produced by the collisions between neutron stars and asteroids. This model can naturally explain the millisecond duration of fast radio bursts. The energetics and event rate can also be safely accounted for. Fast radio bursts thus may be one side of the multifaces of the neutron star-small body collision events, which are previously expected to lead to X-ray/gamma-ray bursts or glitch/anti-glitches.
  • Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are newly discovered radio transient sources. Their high dispersion measures indicate an extragalactic origin. But due to the lack of observational data in other wavelengths, their progenitors still remain unclear. Here we suggest the collisions between neutron stars and asteroids/comets as a promising mechanism for FRBs. During the impact process, a hot plasma fireball will form after the material of the small body penetrates into the neutron star surface. The ionized matter inside the fireball will then expand along the magnetic field lines. Coherent radiation from the thin shell at the top of the fireball will account for the observed FRBs. Our scenario can reasonably explain the main features of FRBs, such as their durations, luminosities, and the event rate. We argue that for a single neutron star, FRBs are not likely to happen repeatedly in a forseeable time span since such impacts are of low probability. We predict that faint remnant X-ray emissions should be associated with FRBs, but it may be too faint to be detected by detectors at work.
  • We suggest that the collision of a small solid body with a pulsar can lead to an observable glitch/anti-glitch. The glitch amplitude depends on the mass of the small body and the impact parameter as well. In the collision, a considerable amount of potential energy will be released either in the form of a short hard X-ray burst or as a relatively long-lasting soft X-ray afterglow. The connection between the glitch amplitude and the X-ray energetics can help to diagnose the nature of these timing anomalies.
  • In recent years, more and more gamma-ray bursts with late rebrightenings in multi-band afterglows unveil the late-time activities of the central engines. GRB 100814A is a special one among the well-sampled events, with complex temporal and spectral evolution. The single power-law shallow decay index of the optical light curve observed by GROND between 640 s and 10 ks is $\alpha_{\rm opt} = 0.57 \pm 0.02$, which apparently conflicts with the simple external shock model expectation. Especially, there is a remarkable rebrightening in the optical to near infrared bands at late time, challenging the external shock model with synchrotron emission coming from the interaction of the blast wave with the surrounding interstellar medium. In this paper, we invoke a magnetar with spin evolution to explain the complex multi-band afterglow emission of GRB 100814A. The initial shallow decay phase in optical bands and the plateau in X-ray can be explained as due to energy injection from a spin-down magnetar. At late time, with the falling of materials from the fall-back disk onto the central object of the burster, angular momentum of the accreted materials is transferred to the magnetar, which leads to a spin-up process. As a result, the magnetic dipole radiation luminosity will increase, resulting in the significant rebrightening of the optical afterglow. It is shown that the observed multi-band afterglow emission can be well reproduced by the model.
  • Strange quark matter (SQM) may be the true ground state of hadronic matter, indicating that the observed pulsars may actually be strange stars, but not neutron stars. According to this SQM hypothesis, the existence of a hydrostatically stable sequence of strange quark matter stars has been predicted, ranging from 1 --- 2 solar mass strange stars, to smaller strange dwarfs and even strange planets. While gravitational wave (GW) astronomy is expected to open a new window to the universe, it will shed light on the searching for SQM stars. Here we show that due to their extreme compactness, strange planets can spiral very close to their host strange stars, without being tidally disrupted. Like inspiraling neutron stars or black holes, these systems would serve as a new kind of sources for GW bursts, producing strong gravitational waves at the final stage. The events occurring in our local Universe can be detected by the upcoming gravitational wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and the Einstein Telescope. This effect provides a unique probe to SQM objects and is hopefully a powerful tool for testing the SQM hypothesis.
  • Long term observations by Brook et al. reveal that the derivative of rotational frequency of PSR J0738-4042 changed abruptly in 2005. Originally, the spin-down rate was relatively stable, with the rotational frequency derivative of $-1.14 \times 10^{-14}~\rm s^{-2}$. After September 2005, the derivative began to rise up. About 1000 days later, it arrived at another relatively stable value of about $-0.98 \times 10^{-14}~\rm s^{-2}$, indicating that the pulsar is spinning-down relatively slowly. To explain the observed spin-down rate change, we resort to an asteroid disrupted by PSR J0738-4042. In our model, the orbital angular momentum of the asteroid is assumed to be parallel to that of the rotating pulsar, so that the pronounced reduction in the spin-down rate can be naturally explained as due to the transfer of the angular momentum from the disrupted material to the central pulsar. The derived magnetospheric radius is about $4.0 \times 10^{9}$ cm, which is smaller than the tidal disruption radius ($4.9 \times 10^{10}$ cm). Our model is self-consistent. It is shown that the variability of the spin-down rate of PSR J0738-4042 can be quantitatively accounted for by the accretion from the asteroid disrupted by the central pulsar.
  • Re-brightening bumps are frequently observed in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Many scenarios have been proposed to interpret the origin of these bumps, of which a blast wave encountering a density-jump in the circumburst environment has been questioned by recent works. We develop a set of differential equations to calculate the relativistic outflow encountering the density-jump by extending the work of Huang et al. (1999). This approach is a semi-analytic method and is very convenient. Our results show that late high-amplitude bumps can not be produced under common conditions, only short plateau may emerge even when the encounter occurs at early time ($< 10^4$ s). In general, our results disfavor the density-jump origin for those observed bumps, which is consistent with the conclusion drawn from full hydrodynamics studies. The bumps thus should be due to other scenarios.
  • GRB 120326A is an unusual gamma-ray burst (GRB) which has a quite long plateau and a very late rebrightening both in X-ray and optical bands. The similar behavior of the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that they maybe have a common origin. The long plateau starts from several hundred seconds and ends at tens of thousands seconds. The peak time of the late rebrightening is about 30000 s. We analyze the energy injection model by means of numerical and analytical solutions, considering both the wind environment and ISM environment for GRB afterglows. We especially study the influence of the injection starting time, ending time, stellar wind density (or density of the circumburst environment), and injection luminosity on the shape of the afterglow light curves, respectively. We find that the light curve is largely affected by the parameters in the wind model. There is a "bump" at the late time only in the wind model too. In the wind case, it is interesting that the longer the energy injected, the more obvious the rebrightening will be. We also find the peak time of bump is determined by the stellar wind density. We use the late continuous injection model to interpret the unusual afterglow of GRB 120326A. The model can well fit the observational data, however, we find that the time scale of the injection must be larger than ten thousands seconds. This implies that the time scale of the central engine activity must be more than ten thousands seconds. This can give useful constraints on the central engine of GRBs. We consider a new born millisecond pulsar with strong magnetic field as the central engine. On the other hand, our results suggest that the circumburst environment of GRB 120326A is very likely a stellar wind.
  • Glitches have been frequently observed in neutron stars. Previously these glitches unexceptionally manifest as sudden spin-ups that can be explained as due to impulsive transfer of angular momentum from the interior superfluid component to the outer solid crust. Alternatively, such spin-up glitches may also be due to large-scale crust-cracking events. However, an unprecedented anti-glitch was recently reported for the magnetar 1E 2259+586. In this case, the magnetar clearly exhibited a sudden spin-down, strongly challenging previous glitch theories. Here we show that the anti-glitch can be well explained by the collision of a small solid body with the magnetar. The intruder has a mass of about $1.1 \times 10^{21}$ g. Its orbital angular momentum is assumed to be antiparallel to that of the spinning magnetar, so that the sudden spin-down can be naturally accounted for. The observed hard X-ray burst and decaying softer X-ray emission associated with the anti-glitch can also be reasonably explained. Our study indicates that a completely different type of glitches as due to collisions between small bodies and neutron stars should exist and may have already been observed previously. It also hints a new way for studying the capture events by neutron stars: through accurate timing observations of pulsars.
  • We propose a consistency test of some recent X-ray gas mass fraction ($f_{\rm{gas}}$) measurements in galaxy clusters, using the cosmic distance-duality relation, $\eta_{\rm{theory}}=\dl(1+z)^{-2}/\da$, with luminosity distance ($\dl$) data from the Union2 compilation of type Ia supernovae. We set $\eta_{\rm{theory}}\equiv1$, instead of assigning any redshift parameterizations to it, and constrain the cosmological information preferred by $f_{\rm{gas}}$ data along with supernova observations. We adopt a new binning method in the reduction of the Union2 data, in order to minimize the statistical errors. Four data sets of X-ray gas mass fraction, which are reported by Allen et al. (2 samples), LaRoque et al. and Ettori et al., are detailedly analyzed against two theoretical modelings of $f_{\rm{gas}}$. The results from the analysis of Allen et al.'s samples prove the feasibility of our method. It is found that the preferred cosmology by LaRoque et al.'s sample is consistent with its reference cosmology within 1-$\sigma$ confidence level. However, for Ettori et al.'s $f_{\rm{gas}}$ sample, the inconsistency can reach more than 3-$\sigma$ confidence level and this dataset shows special preference to an $\Ol=0$ cosmology.
  • Using several cosmological observations, i.e. the cosmic microwave background anisotropies (WMAP), the weak gravitational lensing (CFHTLS), the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations (SDSS+WiggleZ), the most recent observational Hubble parameter data, the Union2.1 compilation of type Ia supernovae, and the HST prior, we impose constraints on the sum of neutrino masses ($\mnu$), the effective number of neutrino species ($\neff$) and dark energy equation of state ($w$), individually and collectively. We find that a tight upper limit on $\mnu$ can be extracted from the full data combination, if $\neff$ and $w$ are fixed. However this upper bound is severely weakened if $\neff$ and $w$ are allowed to vary. This result naturally raises questions on the robustness of previous strict upper bounds on $\mnu$, ever reported in the literature. The best-fit values from our most generalized constraint read $\mnu=0.556^{+0.231}_{-0.288}\rm eV$, $\neff=3.839\pm0.452$, and $w=-1.058\pm0.088$ at 68% confidence level, which shows a firm lower limit on total neutrino mass, favors an extra light degree of freedom, and supports the cosmological constant model. The current weak lensing data are already helpful in constraining cosmological model parameters for fixed $w$. The dataset of Hubble parameter gains numerous advantages over supernovae when $w=-1$, particularly its illuminating power in constraining $\neff$. As long as $w$ is included as a free parameter, it is still the standardizable candles of type Ia supernovae that play the most dominant role in the parameter constraints.
  • Observational growth rate data had been derived from observations of redshift distortions in galaxy redshift surveys. Here we use the growth rate data to place constraints on the dark energy model parameters. By performing a joint analysis with the Type Ia supernova, baryon acoustic oscillation and cosmic microwave background data, it is found that the growth rate data are useful for improving the constraints. The joint constraints show that the $\Lambda$CDM model is still in good agreement with current observations, although a time-variant dark energy still cannot be ruled out. It is argued that the growth rate data are helpful for understanding the dark energy. With more accurate data available in the future, we will have a powerful tool for constraining the cosmological and dark energy parameters.
  • Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have great advantages for their huge burst energies, luminosities and high redshifts in probing the Universe. A few interesting luminosity correlations of GRBs have been used to test cosmology models. Especially, for a subsample of long GRBs with known redshifts and a plateau phase in the afterglow, a correlation between the end time of the plateau phase (in the GRB rest frame) and the corresponding X-ray luminosity has been found. In this paper, we re-analyze the subsample and found that a significantly tighter correlation exists when we add a third parameter, i.e. the isotropic $\gamma$-ray energy release, into the consideration. Additionally, both long and intermediate duration GRBs are consistent with the same three-parameter correlation equation. It is argued that the new three-parameter correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that the subsample of GRBs with a plateau phase in the afterglow be associated with the birth of rapidly rotating magnetars, and that the plateau be due to the continuous energy-injection from the magnetar. It is suggested that the newly born millisecond magnetars associated with GRBs might provide a good standard candle in the Universe.
  • PSR B1259-63/SS 2883 is a binary system in which a 48-ms pulsar orbits around a Be star in a high eccentric orbit with a long orbital period of about 3.4 yr. Extensive broadband observational data are available for this system from radio band to very high energy (VHE) range. The multi-frequency emission is unpulsed and nonthermal, and is generally thought to be related to the relativistic electrons accelerated from the interaction between the pulsar wind and the stellar wind, where X-ray emission is from the synchrotron process and the VHE emission is from the inverse Compton (IC) scattering process. Here a shocked wind model with variation of the magnetic parameter $\sigma$ is developed for explaining the observations. By choosing proper param- eters, our model could reproduce two-peak profile in X-ray and TeV light curves. The effect of the disk exhibits an emission and an absorption components in the X-ray and TeV bands respectively. We suggest that some GeV flares will be produced by Doppler boosting the synchrotron spectrum. This model can possibly be used and be checked in other similar systems such as LS I+61o303 and LS 5039.
  • We propose an off-axis relativistic jet model for the Type Ic supernova SN 2007gr. Most of the energy ($\sim2\times10^{51}$ erg) in the explosion is contained in non-relativistic ejecta which produces the supernova. The optical emission is coming from the decay process of $\rm ^{56}Ni$ synthesized in the bulk SN ejecta. Only very little energy ($\sim10^{48}$ erg) is contained in the relativistic jet with initial velocity about 0.94 times the speed of light. The radio and X-ray emission comes from this relativistic jet. With some typical parameters of a Wolf-Rayet star (progenitor of Type Ic SN), i.e., the mass loss rate $\dot{M}=1.0 \times10^{-5} M_{\odot} \rm yr^{-1}$ and the wind velocity $v_{\rm w}=1.5\times10^{3} \rm km s^{-1}$ together with an observing angle of $\theta_{\rm obs} = 63.3^{\circ}$, we can obtain the multiband light curves that fit the observations well. All the observed data are consistent with our model. Thus we conclude that SN 2007gr contains a weak relativistic jet and we are observing the jet from off-axis.
  • We investigate the dynamical evolution of double-sided jets and present detailed numerical studies on the emission from the receding jet of gamma-ray bursts. It is found that the receding jet emission is generally very weak and only manifests as a plateau in the late time radio afterglow light curves. Additionally, we find that the effect of synchrotron self-absorption can influence the peak time of the receding jet emission significantly.