• We performed optical studies on CaFeAsF single crystals, a parent compound of the 1111-type iron-based superconductors that undergoes a structural phase transition from tetragonal to orthorhombic at $T_s$ = 121 K and a magnetic one to a spin density wave (SDW) state at $T_N$ = 110 K. In the low temperature optical conductivity spectrum, after the subtraction of a narrow Drude peak, we observe a pronounced singularity around 300 cm$^{-1}$ that separates two regions of quasilinear conductivity. We outline that these characteristic absorption features are signatures of Dirac fermions, similar to what was previously reported for the BaFe$_2$As$_2$ system [1]. In support of this interpretation, we show that for the latter system this singular feature disappears rapidly upon electron and hole doping, as expected if it arises from a van Hove singularity in-between two Dirac cones. Finally, we show that one of the infrared-active phonon modes (the Fe-As mode at 250 cm$^{-1}$) develops a strongly asymmetric line shape in the SDW state and note that this behaviour can be explained in terms of a strong coupling with the Dirac fermions.
  • The detailed behavior of the in-plane infrared-active vibrational modes has been determined in AFe$_2$As$_2$ (A$\,=\,$Ca, Sr, and Ba) above and below the structural and magnetic transition at $T_N=$172, 195 and 138 K, respectively. Above $T_N$, two infrared-active $E_u$ modes are observed. In all three compounds, below $T_N$ the low-frequency $E_u$ mode is observed to split into upper and lower branches; with the exception of the Ba material, the oscillator strength across the transition is conserved. In the Ca and Sr materials, the high-frequency $E_u$ mode splits into an upper and a lower branch; however, the oscillator strengths are quite different. Surprisingly, in both the Sr and Ba materials, below $T_N$ the upper branch appears be either very weak or totally absent, while the lower branch displays an anomalous increase in strength. The frequencies and atomic characters of the lattice modes at the center of the Brillouin zone have been calculated for the high-temperature phase for each of these materials. The high-frequency $E_u$ mode does not change in position or character across this series of compounds. Below $T_N$, the $E_u$ modes are predicted to split into features of roughly equal strength. We discuss the possibility that the anomalous increase in the strength of the lower branch of the high-frequency mode below $T_N$ in the Sr and Ba compounds, and the weak (silent) upper branch, may be related to the orbital ordering and a change in the bonding between the Fe and As atoms in the magnetically-ordered state.
  • We measured the optical conductivity of superconducting single crystals of Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ with $x$ ranging from 0.40 (optimal doping, $T_c = 39$ K) down to 0.20 (underdoped, $T_c = 16$ K), where a magnetic order coexists with superconductivity. In the normal state, the low-frequency optical conductivity can be described by an incoherent broad Drude component and a coherent narrow Drude component: the broad one is doping-independent, while the narrow one shows strong scattering in the heavily underdoped compound. In the superconducting state, the formation of the condensate leads to a low-frequency suppression of the optical conductivity spectral weight. In the heavily underdoped region, the superfluid density is significantly suppressed, and the weight of unpaired carriers rapidly increases. We attribute these results to changes in the superconducting gap across the phase diagram, which could show a nodal-to-nodeless transition due to the strong interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in underdoped Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$.
  • The detailed optical properties have been determined for the iron-based materials $A$Fe$_2$As$_2$, where $A=\,$Ca, Sr, and Ba, for light polarized in the iron-arsenic ($a-b$) planes over a wide frequency range, above and below the magnetic and structural transitions at $T_N =$ 172, 195, and 138 K, respectively. The real and imaginary parts of the complex conductivity are fit simultaneously using two Drude terms in combination with a series of oscillators. Above $T_N$, the free-carrier response consists of a weak, narrow Drude term, and a strong, broad Drude term, both of which show only a weak temperature dependence. Below $T_N$ there is a slight decrease of the plasma frequency but a dramatic drop in the scattering rate for the narrow Drude term, and for the broad Drude term there is a significant decrease in the plasma frequency, while the decrease in the scattering rate, albeit significant, is not as severe. The small values observed for the scattering rates for the narrow Drude term for $T\ll{T_N}$ may be related to the Dirac cone-like dispersion of the electronic bands. Below $T_N$ new features emerge in the optical conductivity that are associated with the reconstruction Fermi surface and the gapping of bands at $\Delta_1 \simeq$ 45 $-$ 80 meV, and $\Delta_2 \simeq$ 110 $-$ 210 meV. The reduction in the spectral weight associated with the free carriers is captured by the gap structure, specifically, the spectral weight from the narrow Drude term appears to be transferred into the low-energy gap feature, while the missing weight from the broad term shifts to the high-energy gap.
  • Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron-hole pair excitations can give rise to a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in a variety of systems, such as stripe-phase nickelates, graphene and high-$T_{c}$ superconductors. Here, we reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active $A_1$ phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points (Weyl fermions) through the observation of a Fano resonance in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resultant asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously as the temperature increases. This anomalous behavior originates from the suppression of the electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation of electronic states below the Fermi level ($E_{F}$) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above $E_{F}$. Our findings not only elucidate the underlying mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance, but also open a new route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through the properties of phonons in Weyl semimetals.
  • We investigate spin dynamics in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) multiferroic TbMnO3 using optical- pump, terahertz (THz)-probe spectroscopy. Photoexcitation results in a broadband THz transmission change, with an onset time of 25 ps at 6 K that becomes faster at higher temperatures. We attribute this time constant to spin-lattice thermalization. The excellent agreement between our measurements and previous ultrafast resonant x-ray diffraction measurements on the same material confirms that our THz pulse directly probes spin order. We suggest that this could be the case in general for insulating AFM materials, if the origin of the static absorption in the THz spectral range is magnetic.
  • In iron-based superconductors, a spin-density-wave (SDW) magnetic order is suppressed with doping and unconventional superconductivity appears in close proximity to the SDW instability. The optical response of the SDW order shows clear gap features: substantial suppression in the low-frequency optical conductivity, alongside a spectral weight transfer from low to high frequencies. Here, we study the detailed temperature dependence of the optical response in three different series of the Ba122 system [Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$, Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$ and BaFe$_{2}$(As$_{1-x}$P$_{x}$)$_{2}$]. Intriguingly, we found that the suppression of the low-frequency optical conductivity and spectral weight transfer appear at a temperature $T^{\ast}$ much higher than the SDW transition temperature $T_{SDW}$. Since this behavior has the same optical feature and energy scale as the SDW order, we attribute it to SDW fluctuations. Furthermore, $T^{\ast}$ is suppressed with doping, closely following the doping dependence of the nematic fluctuations detected by other techniques. These results suggest that the magnetic and nematic orders have an intimate relationship, in favor of the magnetic-fluctuation-driven nematicity scenario in iron-based superconductors.
  • The detailed temperature dependence of the infrared-active mode in Fe$_{1.03}$Te ($T_N\simeq 68$ K) and Fe$_{1.13}$Te ($T_N\simeq 56$ K) has been examined, and the position, width, strength, and asymmetry parameter determined using an asymmetric Fano profile superimposed on an electronic background. In both materials the frequency of the mode increases as the temperature is reduced; however, there is also a slight asymmetry in the line shape, indicating that the mode is coupled to either spin or charge excitations. Below $T_N$ there is an anomalous decrease in frequency and the mode shows little temperature dependence, at the same time becoming more symmetric, suggesting a reduction in spin- or electron-phonon coupling. The frequency of the infrared-active mode and the magnitude of the shift below $T_N$ are predicted reasonably well by first-principles calculations; however, the predicted splitting of the mode is not observed. In superconducting FeTe$_{0.55}$Se$_{0.45}$ ($T_c\simeq 14$ K) the infrared-active $E_u$ mode displays asymmetric line shape at all temperatures, which is most pronounced between 100 - 200 K, indicating the presence of either spin- or electron-phonon coupling, which may be a necessary prerequisite for superconductivity in this class of materials.
  • The optical properties of LiFeAs with $T_c \simeq$ 18 K have been determined in the normal and superconducting states. The superposition of two Drude components yields a good description of the low-frequency optical response in the normal state. Below $T_c$, the optical conductivity reveals two isotropic superconducting gaps with $\Delta_{1} \simeq 2.9$ $\pm$ 0.2 meV and $\Delta_{2} \simeq 5.5$ $\pm$ 0.4 meV. A comparison between the superconducting-state Mattis-Bardeen and the normal-state Drude components, in combination with a spectral weight analysis, indicates that the spectral weight associated with a band which has a very small scattering rate is fully transferred to the superfluid weight upon the superconducting condensate. These observations provide clear evidence for the coexistence of clean- and dirty-limit superconductivity in LiFeAs.
  • We systematically measured the Hall effect in the extremely large magnetoresistance semimetal WTe$_2$. By carefully fitting the Hall resistivity to a two-band model, the temperature dependencies of the carrier density and mobility for both electron- and hole-type carriers were determined. We observed a sudden increase of the hole density below $\sim$160~K, which is likely associated with the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition reported by a previous photoemission study. In addition, a more pronounced reduction in electron density occurs below 50~K, giving rise to comparable electron and hole densities at low temperature. Our observations indicate a possible electronic structure change below 50~K, which might be the direct driving force of the electron-hole ``compensation'' and the extremely large magnetoresistance as well. Numerical simulations imply that this material is unlikely to be a perfectly compensated system.
  • Ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy is used to track carrier dynamics in the large magnetoresistance material WTe$_{2}$. Our experiments reveal a fast relaxation process occurring on a sub-picosecond time scale that is caused by electron-phonon thermalization, allowing us to extract the electron-phonon coupling constant. An additional slower relaxation process, occurring on a time scale of $\sim$5-15 picoseconds, is attributed to phonon-assisted electron-hole recombination. As the temperature decreases from 300 K, the timescale governing this process increases due to the reduction of the phonon population. However, below $\sim$50 K, an unusual decrease of the recombination time sets in, most likely due to a change in the electronic structure that has been linked to the large magnetoresistance observed in this material.
  • We present a systematic study of both the temperature and frequency dependence of the optical response in TaAs, a material that has recently been realized to host the Weyl semimetal state. Our study reveals that the optical conductivity of TaAs features a narrow Drude response alongside a conspicuous linear dependence on frequency. The width of the Drude peak decreases upon cooling, following a $T^{2}$ temperature dependence which is expected for Weyl semimetals. Two linear components with distinct slopes dominate the 5-K optical conductivity. A comparison between our experimental results and theoretical calculations suggests that the linear conductivity below $\sim$230~cm$^{-1}$ is a clear signature of the Weyl points lying in very close proximity to the Fermi energy.
  • A series of LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As compounds with different Co concentrations have been studied by transport, optical spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. We observed a Fermi liquid to non-Fermi liquid to Fermi liquid (FL-NFL-FL) crossover alongside a monotonic suppression of the superconductivity with increasing Co content. In parallel to the FL-NFL-FL crossover, we found that both the low-energy spin fluctuations and Fermi surface nesting are enhanced and then diminished, strongly suggesting that the NFL behavior in LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As is induced by low-energy spin fluctuations which are very likely tuned by Fermi surface nesting. Our study reveals a unique phase diagram of LiFe$_{1-x}$Co$_{x}$As where the region of NFL is moved to the boundary of the superconducting phase, implying that they are probably governed by different mechanisms.
  • The detailed optical properties of the multiband iron-chalcogenide superconductor FeTe$_{0.55}$Se$_{0.45}$ have been reexamined for a large number of temperatures above and below the critical temperature $T_c=14$ K for light polarized in the a-b planes. Instead of the simple Drude model that assumes a single band, above $T_c$ the normal-state optical properties are best described by the two-Drude model that considers two separate electronic subsystems; we observe a weak response ($\omega_{p,D;1}\simeq 3000$ cm$^{-1}$) where the scattering rate has a strong temperature dependence ($1/\tau_{D,1}\simeq 32$ cm$^{-1}$ for $T \gtrsim T_c$), and a strong response ($\omega_{p,D;2}\simeq 14\,500$ cm$^{-1}$) with a large scattering rate ($1/\tau_{D,2}\simeq 1720$ cm$^{-1}$) that is essentially temperature independent. The multiband nature of this material precludes the use of the popular generalized-Drude approach commonly applied to single-band materials, implying that any structure observed in the frequency dependent scattering rate $1/\tau(\omega)$ is spurious and it cannot be used as the foundation for optical inversion techniques to determine an electron-boson spectral function $\alpha^2 F(\omega)$. Below $T_c$ the optical conductivity is best described using two superconducting optical gaps of $2\Delta_1\simeq 45$ and $2\Delta_2 \simeq 90$ cm$^{-1}$ applied to the strong and weak responses, respectively. The scattering rates for these two bands are vastly different at low temperature, placing this material simultaneously in both clean and dirty limit. Interestingly, this material falls on the universal scaling line initially observed for the cuprate superconductors.
  • The effect of K, Co and P dopings on the lattice dynamics in the BaFe$_2$As$_2$ system is studied by infrared spectroscopy. We focus on the phonon at $\sim$ 253 cm$^{-1}$, the highest energy in-plane infrared-active Fe-As mode in BaFe$_2$As$_2$. Our studies show that the Co and P dopings lead to a blue shift of this phonon in frequency, which can be simply interpreted by the change of lattice parameters induced by doping. In sharp contrast, an unusual red shift of the same mode was observed in the K-doped compound, at odds with the above explanation. This anomalous behavior in K-doped BaFe$_2$As$_2$ is more likely associated with the coupling between lattice vibrations and other channels, such as charge or spin. This coupling scenario is also supported by the asymmetric line shape and intensity growth of the phonon in the K-doped compound.
  • We measured the in-plane optical conductivity of a nearly optimally doped (Ba,K)Fe2As2 single crystal with Tc = 39.1 K. Upon entering the superconducting state the optical conductivity below ~20 meV vanishes, strongly suggesting a fully gapped system. A BCS-like fit requires two different isotropic gaps to describe the optical response of this material. The temperature dependence of the gaps and the penetration depth suggest a strong interband coupling, but no impurity scattering induced pair breaking is present. This contrasts to the large residual conductivity observed in optimally doped Ba(Fe,Co)2As2 and strongly supports an s(+/-) gap symmetry for these compounds.
  • The temperature dependence of the in-plane optical conductivity has been determined for Fe$_{1.03}$Te above and below the magnetic and structural transition at $T_N\simeq 68$ K. The electron and hole pockets are treated as two separate electronic subsystems; a strong, broad Drude response that is largely temperature independent, and a much weaker, narrow Drude response with a strong temperature dependence. Spectral weight is transferred from high to low frequency below $T_N$, resulting in the dramatic increase of both the low-frequency conductivity and the related plasma frequency. The change in the plasma frequency is due to an increase in the carrier concentration resulting from the closing of the pseudogap on the electron pocket, as well as the likely decrease of the effective mass in the antiferromagnetic state.
  • The optical properties of the superconducting single crystal Rb$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.68}$Se$_2$ with $T_{c}$ $\simeq$ 31 K have been measured over a wide frequency range in the $ab$ plane. We found that the optical conductivity is dominated by a series of infrared-active phonon modes at low-frequency region as well as several other high-frequency bound excitations. The low-frequency optical conductivity has rather low value and shows quite small Drude-like response, indicating low carriers density in this material. Furthermore, the phonon modes increase continuously in frequency with decreasing temperature; specifically, the phonon mode around 200 cm$^{-1}$ shows an enhanced asymmetry effect at low temperatures, suggesting an increasing electron-phonon coupling in this system.
  • The complex optical properties of a single crystal of hexagonal FeCrAs ($T_N \simeq 125$ K) have been determined above and below $T_N$ over a wide frequency range in the planes (along the $b$ axis), and along the perpendicular ($c$ axis) direction. At room temperature, the optical conductivity $\sigma_1(\omega)$ has an anisotropic metallic character. The electronic band structure reveals two bands crossing the Fermi level, allowing the optical properties to be described by two free-carrier (Drude) contributions consisting of a strong, broad component and a weak, narrow term that describes the increase in $\sigma_1(\omega)$ below $\simeq 15$ meV. The dc-resistivity of FeCrAs is ``non-metallic'', meaning that it rises in power-law fashion with decreasing temperature, without any signature of a transport gap. In the analysis of the optical conductivity, the scattering rates for both Drude contributions track the dc-resistivity quite well, leading us to conclude that the non-metallic resistivity of FeCrAs is primarily due to a scattering rate that increases with decreasing temperature, rather than the loss of free carriers. The power law $\sigma_1(\omega) \propto \omega^{-0.6}$ is observed in the near-infrared region and as $T\rightarrow T_N$ spectral weight is transferred from low to high energy ($\gtrsim 0.6$ eV); these effects may be explained by either the two-Drude model or Hund's coupling. We also find that a low-frequency in-plane phonon mode decreases in frequency for $T < T_N$, suggesting the possibility of spin-phonon coupling.
  • We report the observation of a pseudogap in the \emph{ab}-plane optical conductivity of underdoped Ba$_{1-x}$K$_{x}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ ($x = 0.2$ and 0.12) single crystals. Both samples show prominent gaps opened by a spin density wave (SDW) order and superconductivity at the transition temperatures $T_{\it SDW}$ and $T_c$, respectively. In addition, we observe an evident pseudogap below $T^{\ast} \sim$ 75 K, a temperature much lower than $T_{\it SDW}$ but much higher than $T_{c}$. A spectral weight analysis shows that the pseudogap is closely connected to the superconducting gap, indicating the possibility of its being a precursor of superconductivity. The doping dependence of the gaps is also supportive of such a scenario.
  • We report conventional and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy on LaFeAsO$_{1-x}$F$_x$ superconducting thin films. The far-infrared transmission can be quantitatively explained by a two-component model including a conventional s-wave superconducting term and a Drude term, suggesting at least one carrier system has a full superconducting gap. Photo-induced studies of excess quasiparticle dynamics reveal a nanosecond effective recombination time and temperature dependence that agree with a recombination bottleneck in the presence of a full gap. The two experiments provide consistent evidence of a full, nodeless though not necessarily isotropic, gap for at least one carrier system in LaFeAsO$_{1-x}$F$_x$.
  • We determined the optical conductivity of Bi(2)Sr(2-x)La(x)CuO(6) at dopings covering the phase diagram from the underdoped to the overdoped regimes. The frequency dependent scattering rate shows a pseudogap extending into the overdoped regime. We found that the effective mass enhancement calculated from the optical conductivity is constant throughout the phase diagram. Conversely, the effective optical charge density varies almost linearly with doping. Our results suggest that the low frequency electrodynamics of Bi(2)Sr(2-x)La(x)CuO(6) is not strongly affected by the long range Mott transition.
  • The optical conductivity of Ba(Fe$_{0.92}$Co$_{0.08}$)$_2$As$_2$ shows a clear signature of the superconducting gap, but a simple $s$-wave description fails in accounting for the low frequency response. This task is achieved by introducing an extra Drude peak in the superconducting state representing sub-gap absorption, other than thermally broken pairs. This extra peak and the coexisting $s$-wave response respect the total sum rule indicating a common origin for the carriers. We discuss the possible origins for this absorption as (i) quasiparticles due to pair-breaking from interband impurity scattering in a two band $s_{\pm}$ gap symmetry model, which includes (ii) the possible existence of impurity levels within an isotropic gap model; or (iii) an indication that one of the bands is highly anisotropic.