• A growing number of Be and Oe stars, named the gamma Cas stars, are known for their unusually hard and intense X-ray emission. This emission could either trace accretion by a compact companion or magnetic interaction between the star and its decretion disk. To test these scenarios, we carried out a detailed optical monitoring of HD45314, the hottest member of the class of gamma Cas stars, along with dedicated X-ray observations on specific dates. High-resolution optical spectra were taken to monitor the emission lines formed in the disk, while X-ray spectroscopy was obtained at epochs when the optical spectrum of the Oe star was displaying peculiar properties. Over the last four years, HD45314 has entered a phase of spectacular variations. The optical emission lines have undergone important morphology and intensity changes including transitions between single- and multiple-peaked emission lines as well as shell events, and phases of (partial) disk dissipation. Photometric variations are found to be anti-correlated with the equivalent width of the H-alpha emission. Whilst the star preserved its hard and bright X-ray emission during the shell phase, the X-ray spectrum during the phase of (partial) disk dissipation was significantly softer and weaker. The observed behaviour of HD45314 suggests a direct association between the level of X-ray emission and the amount of material simultaneously present in the Oe disk as expected in the magnetic star-disk interaction scenario.
  • We present deep wide-field optical CCD photometry and mid-infrared Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS 24micron data for about 100,000 stars in the young open cluster IC 1805. The members of IC 1805 were selected from their location in the various color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, and the presence of Halpha emission, mid-infrared excess emission, and X-ray emission. The reddening law toward IC 1805 is nearly normal (R_V = 3.05+/-0.06). However, the distance modulus of the cluster is estimated to be 11.9+/-0.2 mag (d = 2.4+/-0.2 kpc) from the reddening-free color-magnitude diagrams, which is larger than the distance to the nearby massive star-forming region W3(OH) measured from the radio VLBA astrometry. We also determined the age of IC 1805 (tau_MSTO = 3.5 Myr). In addition, we critically compared the age and mass scale from two pre-main-sequence evolution models. The initial mass function with a Salpeter-type slope of Gamma = -1.3+/-0.2 was obtained and the total mass of IC 1805 was estimated to be about 2700+/-200 M_sun. Finally, we found our distance determination to be statistically consistent with the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution Data Release 1, within the errors. The proper motion of the B-type stars shows an elongated distribution along the Galactic plane, which could be explained by some of the B-type stars being formed in small clouds dispersed by previous episodes of star formation or supernova explosions.
  • Massive O-type stars play a dominant role in our Universe, but many of their properties remain poorly constrained. In the last decade magnetic fields have been detected in all Galactic members of the distinctive Of?p class, opening the door to a better knowledge of all O-type stars. With the aim of extending the study of magnetic massive stars to nearby galaxies, to better understand the role of metallicity in the formation of their magnetic fields and magnetospheres, and to broaden our knowledge of the role of magnetic fields in massive star evolution, we have carried out spectropolarimetry of five extra-Galactic Of?p stars, as well as a couple of dozen neighbouring stars. We have been able to measure magnetic fields with typical error bars from 0.2 to 1.0 kG, depending on the apparent magnitude and on weather conditions. No magnetic field has been firmly detected in any of our measurements, but we have been able to estimate upper limits to the field values of our target stars. One of our targets, 2dFS 936, exhibited an unexpected strengthening of emission lines. We confirm the unusual behaviour of BI 57, which exhibits a 787 d period with two photometric peaks and one spectroscopic maximum. The observed strengthening of the emission lines of 2dFS 936, and the lack of detection of a strong magnetic field in a star with such strong emission lines is at odd with expectations. Together with the unusual periodic behaviour of BI 57, it represents a challenge for the current models of Of?p stars. The limited precision that we obtained in our field measurements (in most cases as a consequence of poor weather) has led to field-strength upper limits that are substantially larger than those typically measured in Galactic magnetic O stars. Further higher precision observations and monitoring are clearly required.
  • Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of bright, hot stars have found that ~10% of OB-type stars contain strong (mostly dipolar) surface magnetic fields (~kG). The prominent paradigm describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the surface magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock (MCWS) model. In this model, the stellar wind plasma is forced to move along the closed field loops of the magnetic field, colliding at the magnetic equator, and creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the hot wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force due to rapid rotation is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, leading to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere (XADM) model, originally developed for slow rotators, with an implementation of new rapid rotational physics. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-type stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role the added centrifugal force plays in the magnetospheric X-ray emission of these stars.
  • Amongst O-type stars with detected magnetic fields, the fast rotator in the close binary called Plaskett's star shows a variety of unusual properties. Since strong binary interactions are believed to have occurred in this system, one may wonder about their potential role in generating magnetic fields. Stokes V spectra collected with the low-resolution FORS2 and high-resolution ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters were therefore used to search for magnetic fields in 15 interacting or post-interaction massive binaries. No magnetic field was detected in any of them, with 0G always being within 2sigma of the derived values. For 17 out of 25 stars in the systems observed at high-resolution, the 90% upper limit on the individual dipolar fields is below the dipolar field strength of Plaskett's secondary; a similar result is found for five out of six systems observed at low resolution. If our sample is considered to form a group of stars sharing similar magnetic properties, a global statistical analysis results in a stringent upper limit of ~200G on the dipolar field strength. Moreover, the magnetic incidence rate in the full sample of interacting or post-interaction systems (our targets + Plaskett's star) is compatible with that measured from large surveys, showing that they are not significantly different from the general O-star population. These results suggest that binary interactions play no systematic role in the magnetism of such massive systems.
  • Aims. The magnetic star HD148937 is the only Galactic Of?p star surrounded by a nebula. The structure of this nebula is particularly complex and is composed, from the center out outwards, of a close bipolar ejecta nebula (NGC6164/5), an ellipsoidal wind-blown shell, and a spherically symmetric Stromgren sphere. The exact formation process of this nebula and its precise relation to the star's evolution remain unknown. Methods. We analyzed infrared Spitzer IRS and far-infrared Herschel/PACS observations of the NGC6164/5 nebula. The Herschel imaging allowed us to constrain the global morphology of the nebula. We also combined the infrared spectra with optical spectra of the central star to constrain its evolutionary status. We used these data to derive the abundances in the ejected material. To relate this information to the evolutionary status of the star, we also determined the fundamental parameters of HD148937 using the CMFGEN atmosphere code. Results. The H$\alpha$ image displays a bipolar or "8"-shaped ionized nebula, whilst the infrared images show dust to be more concentrated around the central object. We determine nebular abundance ratios of N/O = 1.06 close to the star, and N/O = 1.54 in the bright lobe constituting NGC6164. Interestingly, the parts of the nebula located further from HD148937 appear more enriched in stellar material than the part located closer to the star. Evolutionary tracks suggest that these ejecta have occured $\sim$1.2-1.3 and $\sim$0.6 Myrs ago, respectively. In addition, we derive abundances of argon for the nebula compatible with the solar values and we find a depletion of neon and sulfur. The combined analyses of the known kinematics and of the new abundances of the nebula suggest either a helical morphology for the nebula, possibly linked to the magnetic geometry, or the occurrence of a binary merger.
  • Mass and momentum exchanges in close massive binaries play an important role in their evolution, and produce several observational signatures such as asynchronous rotation and altered chemical compositions, that remain after the stars detach again. We investigated these effects for the detached massive O-star binary HD 149404 (O7.5If + ON9.7I, P = 9.81 days), which is thought to have experienced a past episode of case A Roche-lobe overflow (RLOF). Using phase-resolved spectroscopy, we performed the disentangling of the optical spectra of the two stars. The reconstructed primary and secondary spectra were then analysed with the CMFGEN model atmosphere code to determine stellar parameters, such as the effective temperatures and surface gravities, and to constrain the chemical composition of the components. We complemented the optical study with the study of IUE spectra, which we compare to the synthetic binary spectra. The properties of the stars were compared to evolutionary models. We confirmed a strong overabundance in nitrogen ($\left[\rm N/C\right]\sim150\left[\rm N/C\right]_{\odot}$) for the secondary and a slight nitrogen overabundance ($\left[\rm N/C\right]\sim5\left[\rm N/C\right]_{\odot}$) for the primary star. Comparing the two stars, we found evidence for asynchronous rotation, with a rotational period ratio of $0.50 \pm 0.11$. The hypothesis of a past case A RLOF interaction in HD 149404 is most plausible to explain its chemical abundances and rotational asynchronicity. Some of the observed properties, such as the abundance pattern, are clearly a challenge for current case A binary evolution models, however.
  • The MiMeS project is a large-scale, high resolution, sensitive spectropolarimetric investigation of the magnetic properties of O and early B type stars. Initiated in 2008 and completed in 2013, the project was supported by 3 Large Program allocations, as well as various programs initiated by independent PIs and archival resources. Ultimately, over 4800 circularly polarized spectra of 560 O and B stars were collected with the instruments ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, Narval at the T\'elescope Bernard Lyot, and HARPSpol at the European Southern Observatory La Silla 3.6m telescope, making MiMeS by far the largest systematic investigation of massive star magnetism ever undertaken. In this paper, the first in a series reporting the general results of the survey, we introduce the scientific motivation and goals, describe the sample of targets, review the instrumentation and observational techniques used, explain the exposure time calculation designed to provide sensitivity to surface dipole fields above approximately 100 G, discuss the polarimetric performance, stability and uncertainty of the instrumentation, and summarize the previous and forthcoming publications.
  • We observed NGC 1624-2, the O-type star with the largest known magnetic field Bp~20 kG), in X-rays with the ACIS-S camera onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our two observations were obtained at the minimum and maximum of the periodic Halpha emission cycle, corresponding to the rotational phases where the magnetic field is the closest to equator-on and pole-on, respectively. With these observations, we aim to characterise the star's magnetosphere via the X-ray emission produced by magnetically confined wind shocks. Our main findings are: (i) The observed spectrum of NGC 1624-2 is hard, similar to the magnetic O-type star Theta 1 Ori C, with only a few photons detected below 0.8 keV. The emergent X-ray flux is 30% lower at the Halpha minimum phase. (ii) Our modelling indicated that this seemingly hard spectrum is in fact a consequence of relatively soft intrinsic emission, similar to other magnetic Of?p stars, combined with a large amount of local absorption (~1-3 x 10^22 cm^-2). This combination is necessary to reproduce both the prominent Mg and Si spectral features, and the lack of flux at low energies. NGC 1624-2 is intrinsically luminous in X-rays (log LX emission ~ 33.4) but 70-95% of the X-ray emission produced by magnetically confined wind shocks is absorbed before it escapes the magnetosphere (log LX ISM corrected ~ 32.5). (iii) The high X-ray luminosity, its variation with stellar rotation, and its large attenuation are all consistent with a large dynamical magnetosphere with magnetically confined wind shocks.
  • We present an overview of four phase-constrained Chandra HETGS X-ray observations of Delta Ori A. Delta Ori A is actually a triple system which includes the nearest massive eclipsing spectroscopic binary, Delta Ori Aa, the only such object which can be observed with little phase-smearing with the Chandra gratings. Since the fainter star, Delta Ori Aa2, has a much lower X-ray luminosity than the brighter primary, Delta Ori A provides a unique system with which to test the spatial distribution of the X-ray emitting gas around Delta Ori Aa1 via occultation by the photosphere of and wind cavity around the X-ray dark secondary. Here we discuss the X-ray spectrum and X-ray line profiles for the combined observation, having an exposure time of nearly 500 ksec and covering nearly the entire binary orbit. Companion papers discuss the X-ray variability seen in the Chandra spectra, present new space-based photometry and ground-based radial velocities simultaneous with the X-ray data to better constrain the system parameters, and model the effects of X-rays on the optical and UV spectrum. We find that the X-ray emission is dominated by embedded wind shock emission from star Aa1, with little contribution from the tertiary star Ab or the shocked gas produced by the collision of the wind of Aa1 against the surface of Aa2. We find a similar temperature distribution to previous X-ray spectrum analyses. We also show that the line half-widths are about $0.3-0.5\times$ the terminal velocity of the wind of star Aa1. We find a strong anti-correlation between line widths and the line excitation energy, which suggests that longer-wavelength, lower-temperature lines form farther out in the wind. Our analysis also indicates that the ratio of the intensities of the strong and weak lines of \ion{Fe}{17} and \ion{Ne}{10} are inconsistent with model predictions, which may be an effect of resonance scattering
  • We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral dataset of the $\delta$ Orionis Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS HETGS, have a total exposure time of ~479 ks and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range 5-25 $\AA$ is confirmed, with maximum amplitude of about +/-15% within a single ~125 ks observation. Periods of 4.76d and 2.04d are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in flux level throughout the 9-day observational campaign. Using 40 ks contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S XV, Si XIII, and Ne IX. For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phase=0.0 when the secondary $\delta$ Orionis Aa2 is at inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability.
  • Probing the structures of stellar winds is of prime importance for the understanding of massive stars. Based on their optical spectral morphology and variability, the stars of the Oef class have been suggested to feature large-scale structures in their wind. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time-series of X-ray observations of presumably-single O-type stars can help us understand the physics of their stellar winds. We have collected XMM-Newton observations and coordinated optical spectroscopy of the O6Ief star lambda Cep to study its X-ray and optical variability and to analyse its high-resolution X-ray spectrum. We investigate the line profile variability of the He II 4686 and H-alpha emission lines in our time series of optical spectra, including a search for periodicities. We further discuss the variability of the broadband X-ray flux and analyse the high-resolution spectrum of lambda Cep using line-by-line fits as well as a code designed to fit the full high-resolution X-ray spectrum consistently. During our observing campaign, the He II 4686 line varies on a timescale of ~18 hours. On the contrary, the H-alpha line profile displays a modulation on a timescale of 4.1 days which is likely the rotation period of the star. The X-ray flux varies on time-scales of days and could in fact be modulated by the same 4.1 days period as H-alpha, although both variations are shifted in phase. The high-resolution X-ray spectrum reveals broad and skewed emission lines as expected for the X-ray emission from a distribution of wind-embedded shocks. Most of the X-ray emission arises within less than 2R* above the photosphere.
  • Far-infrared Herschel PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula around the luminous blue variable (LBV) star AG Car have been obtained along with optical imaging in the Halpha+[NII] filter. In the infrared light, the nebula appears as a clumpy ring shell that extends up to 1.2 pc with an inner radius of 0.4 pc. It coincides with the Halpha nebula, but extends further out. Dust modeling of the nebula was performed and indicates the presence of large grains. The dust mass is estimated to be ~ 0.2 Msun. The infrared spectrum of the nebula consists of forbidden emission lines over a dust continuum. Apart from ionized gas, these lines also indicate the existence of neutral gas in a photodissociation region that surrounds the ionized region. The abundance ratios point towards enrichment by processed material. The total mass of the nebula ejected from the central star amounts to ~ 15 Msun, assuming a dust-to-gas ratio typical of LBVs. The abundances and the mass-loss rate were used to constrain the evolutionary path of the central star and the epoch at which the nebula was ejected, with the help of available evolutionary models. This suggests an ejection during a cool LBV phase for a star of ~ 55 Msun with little rotation.
  • We report magnetic and spectroscopic observations and modeling of the Of?p star CPD -28 2561. Using more than 75 new spectra, we have measured the equivalent width variations and examined the dynamic spectra of photospheric and wind-sensitive spectral lines. A period search results in an unambiguous 73.41 d variability period. High resolution spectropolarimetric data analyzed using Least-Squares Deconvolution yield a Zeeman signature detected in the mean Stokes V profile corresponding to phase 0.5 of the spectral ephemeris. Interpreting the 73.41 d period as the stellar rotational period, we have phased the equivalent widths and inferred longitudinal field measurements. The phased magnetic data exhibit a weak sinusoidal variation, with maximum of about 565 G at phase 0.5, and a minimum of about -335 G at phase 0.0, with extrema approximately in phase with the (double-wave) Halpha equivalent width variation. Modeling of the Halpha equivalent width variation assuming a quasi-3D magnetospheric model produces a unique solution for the ambiguous couplet of inclination and magnetic obliquity angles: (i, beta) or (beta, i)=(35 deg,90 deg). Adopting either geometry, the longitudinal field variation yields a dipole polar intensity Bd=2.6\pm 0.9~kG, consistent with that obtained from direct modelling of the Stokes V profiles. We derive a wind magnetic confinement parameter eta*\simeq 100, leading to an Alfv\'en radius RA\simeq 3-5~R*, and a Kepler radius RK\simeq 20~R*. This supports a physical scenario in which the Halpha emission and other line variability have their origin in an oblique, co-rotating 'dynamical magnetosphere' structure resulting from a magnetically channeled wind. Nevertheless, the details of the formation of spectral lines and their variability within this framework remain generally poorly understood.
  • Eclipsing systems of massive stars allow one to explore the properties of their components in great detail. We perform a multi-wavelength, non-LTE analysis of the three components of the massive multiple system $\delta$ Ori A, focusing on the fundamental stellar properties, stellar winds, and X-ray characteristics of the system. The primary's distance-independent parameters turn out to be characteristic for its spectral type (O9.5 II), but usage of the ${\rm \it Hipparcos}$ parallax yields surprisingly low values for the mass, radius, and luminosity. Consistent values follow only if $\delta$ Ori lies at about twice the ${\rm \it Hipparcos}$ distance, in the vicinity of the $\sigma$-Orionis cluster. The primary and tertiary dominate the spectrum and leave the secondary only marginally detectable. We estimate the V-band magnitude difference between primary and secondary to be $\Delta V \approx 2.\!\!^{\rm m}8$. The inferred parameters suggest the secondary is an early B-type dwarf ($\approx$ B1 V), while the tertiary is an early B-type subgiant ($\approx$ B0 IV). We find evidence for rapid turbulent velocities ($\sim 200$ km ${\rm s}^{-1}$) and wind inhomogeneities, partially optically thick, in the primary's wind. The bulk of the X-ray emission likely emerges from the primary's stellar wind ($\log L_{\text{X}} / L_{\text{Bol}} \approx -6.85$), initiating close to the stellar surface at $R_0 \sim 1.1\,R_*$. Accounting for clumping, the mass-loss rate of the primary is found to be $\log \dot{M} \approx -6.4\,[M_\odot\,{\rm yr}^{-1}]$, which agrees with hydrodynamic predictions, and provides a consistent picture along the X-ray, UV, optical and radio spectral domains.
  • The Oe stars HD45314 and HD60848 have recently been found to exhibit very different X-ray properties: whilst HD60848 has an X-ray spectrum and emission level typical of most OB stars, HD45314 features a much harder and brighter X-ray emission, making it a so-called gamma Cas analogue. Monitoring the optical spectra could provide hints towards the origin of these very different behaviours. We analyse a large set of spectroscopic observations of HD45314 and HD60848, extending over 20 years. We further attempt to fit the H-alpha line profiles of both stars with a simple model of emission line formation in a Keplerian disk. Strong variations in the strengths of the H-alpha, H-beta, and He I 5876 emission lines are observed for both stars. In the case of HD60848, we find a time lag between the variations in the equivalent widths of these lines. The emission lines are double peaked with nearly identical strengths of the violet and red peaks. The H-alpha profile of this star can be successfully reproduced by our model of a disk seen under an inclination of 30 degrees. In the case of HD45314, the emission lines are highly asymmetric and display strong line profile variations. We find a major change in behaviour between the 2002 outburst and the one observed in 2013. This concerns both the relationship between the equivalent widths of the various lines and their morphologies at maximum strength (double-peaked in 2002 versus single-peaked in 2013). Our simple disk model fails to reproduce the observed H-alpha line profiles of HD45314. Our results further support the interpretation that Oe stars do have decretion disks similar to those of Be stars. Whilst the emission lines of HD60848 are explained by a disk with a Keplerian velocity field, the disk of HD45314 seems to have a significantly more complex velocity field that could be related to the phenomenon that produces its peculiar X-ray emission.
  • HDE228766 is a very massive binary system hosting a secondary component, which is probably in an intermediate evolutionary stage between an Of supergiant and an WN star. The wind of this star collides with the wind of its O8 II companion, leading to relatively strong X-ray emission. Measuring the orbital variations of the line-of-sight absorption toward the X-ray emission from the wind-wind interaction zone yields information on the wind densities of both stars. X-ray spectra have been collected at three key orbital phases to probe the winds of both stars. Optical photometry has been gathered to set constraints on the orbital inclination of the system. The X-ray spectra reveal prominent variations of the intervening column density toward the X-ray emission zone, which are in line with the expectations for a wind-wind collision. We use a toy model to set constraints on the stellar wind parameters by attempting to reproduce the observed variations of the relative fluxes and wind optical depths at 1 keV. The lack of strong optical eclipses sets an upper limit of about 68 degrees on the orbital inclination. The analysis of the variations of the X-ray spectra suggests an inclination in the range 54 - 61 degrees and indicates that the secondary wind momentum ratio exceeds that of the primary by at least a factor 5. Our models further suggest that the bulk of the X-ray emission arises from the innermost region of the wind interaction zone, which is from a region whose outer radius, as measured from the secondary star, lies between 0.5 and 1.5 times the orbital separation.
  • X-ray and radio data recently acquired as part of a project to study Cyg OB2#9 are used to constrain physical models of the binary system, providing in-depth knowledge about the wind-wind collision and the thermal, and non-thermal, emission arising from the shocks. We use a three-dimensional, adaptive mesh refinement simulation (including wind acceleration, radiative cooling, and the orbital motion of the stars) to model the gas dynamics of the wind-wind collision. The simulation output is used as the basis for radiative transfer calculations considering the thermal X-ray emission and the thermal/non-thermal radio emission. To obtain good agreement with the X-ray observations, our initial mass-loss rate estimates require a down-shift by a factor of roughly 7.7 to $6.5\times10^{-7}$ and $7.5\times10^{-7}$ solar mass per year for the primary and secondary star, respectively. Furthermore, the low gas densities and high shock velocities in Cyg OB2#9 are suggestive of unequal electron and ion temperatures, and the X-ray analysis indicates that an (immediately post-shock) electron-ion temperature ratio of $\simeq 0.1$ is also required. The radio emission is dominated by (non-thermal) synchrotron emission. A parameter space exploration provides evidence against models assuming equipartition between magnetic and relativistic energy densities. However, fits of comparable quality can be attained with models having stark contrasts in the ratio of magnetic-to-relativistic energy densities. The radio models also reveal a subtle effect whereby inverse Compton cooling leads to an increase in emissivity as a result of the synchrotron characteristic frequency being significantly reduced. Finally, using the results of the radio analysis, we estimate the surface magnetic field strengths to be $\approx 0.3-52\;$G. (Abridged)
  • We report on the analysis of the Chandra-ACIS data of O, B and WR stars in the young association Cyg OB2. X-ray spectra of 49 O-stars, 54 B-stars and 3 WR-stars are analyzed and for the brighter sources, the epoch dependence of the X-ray fluxes is investigated. The O-stars in Cyg\,OB2 follow a well-defined scaling relation between their X-ray and bolometric luminosities: log(Lx/Lbol) = -7.2 +/- 0.2. This relation is in excellent agreement with the one previously derived for the Carina OB1 association. Except for the brightest O-star binaries, there is no general X-ray overluminosity due to colliding winds in O-star binaries. Roughly half of the known B-stars in the surveyed field are detected, but they fail to display a clear relationship between Lx and Lbol. Out of the three WR stars in Cyg OB2, probably only WR144 is itself responsible for the observed level of X-ray emission, at a very low log(Lx/Lbol) = -8.8 +/- 0.2. The X-ray emission of the other two WR-stars (WR145 and 146) is most probably due to their O-type companion along with a moderate contribution from a wind-wind interaction zone.
  • We initiated long-term optical interferometry monitoring of the diameters of unstable yellow hypergiants (YHG) with the goal of detecting both the long-term evolution of their radius and shorter term formation related to large mass-loss events. We observed HR5171 A with AMBER/VLTI. We also examined archival photometric data in the visual and near-IR spanning more than 60 years, as well as sparse spectroscopic data. HR5171A exhibits a complex appearance. Our AMBER data reveal a surprisingly large star for a YHG R*=1315+/-260Rsun\ (~6.1AU) at the distance of 3.6+/-0.5kpc. The source is surrounded by an extended nebulosity, and these data also show a large level of asymmetry in the brightness distribution of the system, which we attribute to a newly discovered companion star located in front of the primary star. The companion's signature is also detected in the visual photometry, which indicates an orbital period of Porb=1304+/-6d. Modeling the light curve with the NIGHTFALL program provides clear evidence that the system is a contact or possibly over-contact eclipsing binary. A total current system mass of 39^{+40}_{-22} solar mass and a high mass ratio q>10 is inferred for the system. The low-mass companion of HR5171 A is very close to the primary star that is embedded within its dense wind. Tight constraints on the inclination and vsini of the primary are lacking, which prevents us from determining its influence precisely on the mass-loss phenomenon, but the system is probably experiencing a wind Roche-Lobe overflow. Depending on the amount of angular momentum that can be transferred to the stellar envelope, HR5171 A may become a fast-rotating B[e]/Luminous Blue Variable (LBV)/Wolf-Rayet star. In any case, HR5171 A highlights the possible importance of binaries for interpreting the unstable YHGs and for massive star evolution in general.
  • Context. Massive-binary evolution models predict that some systems will go through an evolutionary phase where the original primary has become a supernova and left a compact object behind that then orbits a Wolf-Rayet (hereafter, WR) star. WR 138 is an X-ray bright WR star that has been described as a triple system, including a compact companion in a short-period orbit. Aims. Our goal is to search for spectroscopic evidence of a compact companion around WR 138. Methods. We used optical and X-ray spectra to search for signatures of a compact companion, which can be revealed by systematic variations in WR optical spectral lines induced by orbital motion of the compact companion or by hard, luminous X-rays from accretion onto this companion. Results. The optical spectra display emission-line profile variations that are most probably caused by clumps inside the stellar winds. The radial velocities do not vary on a short time-scale compatible with the suggested orbital period of a putative compact companion. The X-ray spectra are found to be normal for a WN5-6+OB system with no indication of accretion by a compact companion. Conclusions. There is no evidence for the presence of a compact companion, and we therefore conclude that WR 138 is a normal long-period (P~1521 d) eccentric WR+OB system.
  • We have obtained far-infrared Herschel PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebular environment of the luminous blue variable WRAY 15-751. These images clearly show that the main, dusty nebula is a shell of radius 0.5 pc and width 0.35 pc extending outside the H-alpha nebula. They also reveal a second, bigger and fainter dust nebula, observed for the first time. Both nebulae lie in an empty cavity, likely the remnant of the O-star wind bubble formed when the star was on the main sequence. The kinematic ages of the nebulae are about 20000 and 80000 years and each nebula contains about 0.05 Msun of dust. Modeling of the inner nebula indicates a Fe-rich dust. The far-infrared spectrum of the main nebula revealed forbidden emission lines coming from ionized and neutral gas. Our study shows that the main nebula consists of a shell of ionized gas surrounded by a thin photodissociation region illuminated by an "average" early-B star. The derived abundance ratios N/O=1.0+/-0.4 and C/O=0.4+/-0.2 indicate a mild N/O enrichment. We estimate that the inner shell contains 1.7+/-0.6 Msun of gas. Assuming a similar dust-to-gas ratio for the outer nebula, the total mass ejected by WRAY 15-751 amounts to 4+/-2 Msun. The measured abundances, masses and kinematic ages of the nebulae were used to constrain the evolution of the star and the epoch at which the nebulae were ejected. Our results point to an ejection of the nebulae during the RSG evolutionary phase of an ~ 40 Msun star. The presence of multiple shells around the star suggests that the mass-loss was not a continuous ejection but rather a series of episodes of extreme mass-loss. Our measurements are compatible with the recent evolutionary tracks computed for an 40 Msun star with little rotation. They support the O-BSG-RSG-YSG-LBV filiation and the idea that high-luminosity and low-luminosity LBVs follow different evolutionary paths.
  • Oe stars possibly form an extension to higher temperatures of the Be phenomenon, but it is still unclear whether these stars have disks. X-ray spectra could provide hints for interactions of the star with a putative surrounding disk. We obtained XMM-Newton observations of two Oe stars, HD45314 and HD60848. Spectra and light curves were extracted and analysed. Optical spectra were also obtained to support the X-ray observations. We find that both stars display very different X-ray properties. Whilst HD60848 has an X-ray spectrum and emission level typical for its spectral type, HD45314 displays a very hard X-ray emission, dominated by a thermal plasma with kT ~ 21 keV. Furthermore, HD45314 displays count rate variations by a factor 2 on timescales of ~ 1000s and a high log(L_X/L_bol) = -6.10 +/- 0.03. The X-ray properties of HD45314 indicate that this star is a new member of the class of gamma Cas analogs, the first one among the original category of Oe stars.
  • Stars over a wide range of masses and evolutionary stages are nowadays known to emit X-rays. This X-ray emission is a unique probe of the most energetic phenomena occurring in the circumstellar environment of these stars, and provides precious insight on magnetic phenomena or hydrodynamic shocks. Owing to its large collecting area, Athena+ will open up an entirely new window on these phenomena. Indeed, Athena+ will not only allow us to study many more objects with an unprecedented spectral resolution, but will also pioneer the study of the dynamics of these objects via time-resolved high-resolution spectroscopy. In this way, Athena+ will be a unique tool to study accretion processes in TTauri stars, flaring activity in young stars, dynamos in ultra-cool dwarfs, small and large-scale structures in the winds of single massive stars, wind interactions in massive binary systems, hot bubbles in planetary nebula... All these studies will lead to a deeper understanding of yet poorly understood processes which have profound impact in star and planetary system formation as well as in feedback processes on Galactic scale.
  • Context. Zeta Pup is the X-ray brightest O-type star of the sky. This object was regularly observed with the RGS instrument aboard XMM-Newton for calibration purposes, leading to an unprecedented set of high-quality spectra. Aims. We have previously reduced and extracted this data set and combined it into the most detailed high-resolution X-ray spectrum of any early-type star so far. Here we present the analysis of this spectrum accounting for the presence of structures in the stellar wind. Methods. For this purpose, we use our new modeling tool that allows fitting the entire spectrum with a multi-temperature plasma. We illustrate the impact of a proper treatment of the radial dependence of the X-ray opacity of the cool wind on the best-fit radial distribution of the temperature of the X-ray plasma. Results. The best fit of the RGS spectrum of Zeta Pup is obtained assuming no porosity. Four plasma components at temperatures between 0.10 and 0.69 keV are needed to adequately represent the observed spectrum. Whilst the hardest emission is concentrated between ~3 and 4 R*, the softer emission starts already at 1.5 R* and extends to the outer regions of the wind. Conclusions. The inferred radial distribution of the plasma temperatures agrees rather well with theoretical expectations. The mass- loss rate and CNO abundances corresponding to our best-fit model also agree quite well with the results of recent studies of Zeta Pup in the UV and optical domain.