• Electric field effect (EFE) controlled magnetoelectric transport in thin films of undoped and La-doped Sr$_{2}$IrO$_{4}$ (SIO) were investigated under the action of ionic liquid gating. Despite large carrier density modulation, the temperature dependent resistance measurements exhibit insulating behavior in chemically and EFE doped samples with the band filling up to 10\%. The ambipolar transport across the Mott gap is demonstrated by EFE tuning of the activation energy. Further, we observe a crossover from a negative magnetoresistance (MR) at high temperatures to positive MR at low temperatures. The crossover temperature was around $\sim$80-90 K, irrespective of the filling. This temperature and magnetic field dependent crossover is qualitatively associated with a change in the conduction mechanism from Mott to Coulomb gap mediated variable range hopping (VRH). This explains the origin of robust insulating ground state of SIO in electrical transport studies and highlights the importance of disorder and Coulombic interaction on electrical properties of SIO.
  • We report the discovery of a metamagnetic phase transition in a polar antiferromagnet Ni$_3$TeO$_6$ that occurs at 52 T. The new phase transition accompanies a colossal magnetoelectric effect, with a magnetic-field-induced polarization change of 0.3 $\mu$C/cm$^2$, a value that is 4 times larger than for the spin-flop transition at 9 T in the same material, and also comparable to the largest magnetically-induced polarization changes observed to date. Via density-functional calculations we construct a full microscopic model that describes the data. We model the spin structures in all fields and clarify the physics behind the 52 T transition. The high-field transition involves a competition between multiple different exchange interactions which drives the polarization change through the exchange-striction mechanism. The resultant spin structure is rather counter-intuitive and complex, thus providing new insights on design principles for materials with strong magnetoelectric coupling.
  • We study magnetic and multiferroic behavior in Ca$_3$Co$_{2-x}$Mn$_{x}$O$_6$ ($x \sim$0.97) by high-field measurements of magnetization ($M$), magnetostriction ($L$($H$)/$L$), electric polarization ($P$), and magnetocaloric effect. This study also gives insight into the zero and low magnetic field magnetic structure and magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms. We measured $M$ and $\Delta$$L$/$L$ up to pulsed magnetic fields of 92 T, and determined the saturation moment and field. On the controversial topic of the spin states of Co$^{2+}$ and Mn$^{4+}$ ions, we find evidence for $S$ = 3/2 spins for both ions with no magnetic field-induced spin-state crossovers. Our data also indicate that Mn$^{4+}$ spins are quasi-isotropic and develop components in the $ab$-plane in applied magnetic fields of 10 T. These spins cant until saturation at 85 T whereas the Ising Co$^{2+}$ spins saturate by 25 T. Furthermore, our results imply that mechanism for suppression of electric polarization with magnetic fields near 10 T is flopping of the Mn$^{4+}$ spins into the $ab$-plane, indicating that appropriate models must include the coexistence of Ising and quasi-isotropic spins.
  • Structural and magnetic chiralities are found to coexist in a small group of materials in which they produce intriguing phenomenologies such as the recently discovered skyrmion phases. Here, we describe a previously unknown manifestation of this interplay in MnSb2O6, a trigonal oxide with a chiral crystal structure. Unlike all other known cases, the MnSb2O6 magnetic structure is based on co-rotating cycloids rather than helices. The coupling to the structural chirality is provided by a magnetic axial vector, related to the so-called vector chirality. We show that this unique arrangement is the magnetic ground state of the symmetric-exchange Hamiltonian, based on ab-initio theoretical calculations of the Heisenberg exchange interactions, and is stabilised by out-of-plane anisotropy. MnSb2O6 is predicted to be multiferroic with a unique ferroelectric switching mechanism.
  • Magnetic domains at the surface of a ferroelectric monodomain BiFeO3 single crystal have been imaged by hard X-ray magnetic scattering. Magnetic domains up to several hundred microns in size have been observed, corresponding to cycloidal modulations of the magnetization along the wave-vector k=2\pi(\delta,\delta,0) and symmetry equivalent directions. The rotation direction of the magnetization in all magnetic domains, determined by diffraction of circularly polarized light, was found to be unique and in agreement with predictions of a combined approach based on a spin-model complemented by relativistic density-functional simulations. Imaging of the surface shows that the largest adjacent domains display a 120 degree vortex structure.
  • Although abundant research has focused recently on the quantum criticality of itinerant magnets, critical phenomena of insulating magnets in the vicinity of critical endpoints (CEP's) have rarely been revealed. Here we observe an emergent CEP at 2.05 T and 2.2 K with a suppressed thermal conductivity and concomitant strong critical fluctuations evident via a divergent magnetic susceptibility (e.g., chi''(2.05 T, 2.2 K)/chi''(3 T, 2.2 K)=23,500 %, comparable to the critical opalescence in water) in the hexagonal insulating antiferromagnet HoMnO3.
  • The presence of ferroelectricity in hexagonal (h-)InMnO3 has been highly under debate. The results of our comprehensive experiments of low-temperature (T) polarization, TEM and HAADF-STEM on well-controlled h-InMnO3 reveal that the ground state is ferroelectric with P6_3cm symmetry, but a non-ferroelectric P-3c1 state exists at high T, and can be quenched to room T. We also found that the ferroelectric P6_3cm state of h-InMnO3 exhibits the domain configuration of topological vortices, as has been observed in h-REMnO3 (RE=rare earths).
  • In bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3), antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric order coexist at room temperature, making it of particular interest for studying magnetoelectric coupling. The mutual control of magnetic and electric properties is very useful for a wide variety of applications. This has led to an enormous amount of research into the properties of BiFeO$_3$. Nonetheless, one of the most fundamental aspects of this material, namely the symmetries of the lattice vibrations, remains controversial.We present a comprehensive Raman study of BiFeO$_3$ single crystals with the approach of monitoring the Raman spectra while rotating the polarization direction of the excitation laser. Our method results in unambiguous assignment of the phonon symmetries and explains the origin of the controversy in the literature. Furthermore, it provides access to the Raman tensor elements enabling direct comparison with theoretical calculations. Hence, this allows the study of symmetry breaking and coupling mechanisms in a wide range of complex materials and may lead to a noninvasive, all-optical method to determine the orientation and magnitude of the ferroelectric polarization.
  • We discovered that perovskite (Ba,La)SnO3 can have excellent carrier mobility even though its band gap is large. The Hall mobility of Ba0.98La0.02SnO3 crystals with the n-type carrier concentration of \sim 8-10\times10 19 cm-3 is found to be \sim 103 cm2 V-1s-1 at room temperature, and the precise measurement of the band gap \Delta of a BaSnO3 crystal shows \Delta=4.05 eV, which is significantly larger than those of other transparent conductive oxides. The high mobility with a wide band gap indicates that (Ba,La)SnO3 is a promising candidate for transparent conductor applications and also epitaxial all-perovskite multilayer devices.
  • By directly measuring electrical hysteresis loops using the Positive-Up Negative-Down (PUND) method, we accurately determined the remanent ferroelectric polarization Pr of orthorhombic RMnO3 (R = Ho, Tm, Yb, and Lu) compounds below their E-type spin ordering temperatures. We found that LuMnO3 has the largest Pr of 0.17 uC/cm^2 at 6 K in the series, indicating that its single-crystal form can produce a Pr of at least 0.6 \muuC/cm^2 at 0 K. Furthermore, at a fixed temperature, Pr decreases systematically with increasing rare earth ion radius from R = Lu to Ho, exhibiting a strong correlation with the variations in the in-plane Mn-O-Mn bond angle and Mn-O distances. Our experimental results suggest that the contribution of the Mn t2g orbitals dominates the ferroelectric polarization.
  • The study of abrupt increases in magnetization with magnetic field known as metamagnetic transitions has opened a rich vein of new physics in itinerant electron systems, including the discovery of quantum critical end points with a marked propensity to develop new kinds of order. However, the electric analogue of the metamagnetic critical end point, a "metaelectric" critical end point has not yet been realized. Multiferroic materials wherein magnetism and ferroelectricity are cross-coupled are ideal candidates for the exploration of this novel possibility using magnetic-field (\emph{H}) as a tuning parameter. Herein, we report the discovery of a magnetic-field-induced metaelectric transition in multiferroic BiMn$_{2}$O$_{5}$ in which the electric polarization (\emph{P}) switches polarity along with a concomitant Mn spin-flop transition at a critical magnetic field \emph{H}$_{\rm c}$. The simultaneous metaelectric and spin-flop transitions become sharper upon cooling, but remain a continuous crossover even down to 0.5 K. Near the \emph{P}=0 line realized at $\mu_{0}$\emph{H}$_{\rm c}$$\approx$18 T below 20 K, the dielectric constant ($\varepsilon$) increases significantly over wide field- and temperature (\emph{T})-ranges. Furthermore, a characteristic power-law behavior is found in the \emph{P}(\emph{H}) and $\varepsilon$(\emph{H}) curves at \emph{T}=0.66 K. These findings indicate that a magnetic-field-induced metaelectric critical end point is realized in BiMn$_2$O$_5$ near zero temperature.
  • Temperature- and field-dependent measurements of the Hall effect of pure and 4 % Rh-doped URu$_{2}$Si$_{2}$ reveal low density (0.03 hole/U) high mobility carriers to be unique to the `hidden order' phase and consistent with an itinerant density-wave order parameter. The Fermi surface undergoes a series of abrupt changes as the magnetic field is increased. When combined with existing de Haas-van Alphen data, the Hall data expose a strong interplay between the stability of the `hidden order,' the degree of polarization of the Fermi liquid and the Fermi surface topology.
  • A dramatic increase in the total thermal conductivity (k) is observed in the Hidden Order (HO) state of single crystal URu2Si2. Through measurements of the thermal Hall conductivity, we explicitly show that the electronic contribution to k is extremely small, so that this large increase in k is dominated by phonon conduction. An itinerant BCS/mean-field model describes this behavior well: the increase in kappa is associated with the opening of a large energy gap at the Fermi Surface, thereby decreasing electron-phonon scattering. Our analysis implies that the Hidden Order parameter is strongly coupled to the lattice, suggestive of a broken symmetry involving charge degrees of freedom.