• A large reverberation mapping study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 has yielded emission-line lags for Hbeta 4861 and He II 4686 and a central black hole mass measurement of about 10 million solar masses, consistent with previous measurements. A very low level of variability during the monitoring campaign precluded meeting our original goal of recovering velocity-delay maps from the data, but with the new Hbeta measurement, NGC 7469 is no longer an outlier in the relationship between the size of the Hbeta-emitting broad-line region and the AGN luminosity. It was necessary to detrend the continuum and Hbeta and He II 4686 line light curves and those from archival UV data for different time-series analysis methods to yield consistent results.
  • We present the results of a dust reverberation survey for 17 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies, which provides the largest homogeneous data collection for the radius of the innermost dust torus. A delayed response of the K-band light curve after the V-band light curve was found for all targets, and 49 measurements of lag times between the flux variation of the dust emission in the K band and that of the optical continuum emission in the V band were obtained. The lag times strongly correlated with the optical luminosity in the luminosity range of M_V=-16 to -22 mag, and the regression analysis was performed to obtain the correlation log $\Delta t$ (days) = -2.11 -0.2 M_V assuming $\Delta t \propto L^{0.5}$, which was theoretically expected. We discuss the possible origins of the intrinsic scatter of the dust lag-luminosity correlation, which was estimated to be about 0.13 dex, and we find that the difference of internal extinction and delayed response of changes in lag times to the flux variations could have partly contributed to intrinsic scatter. However, we could not detect any systematic change of the correlation with the subclass of the Seyfert type or the Eddington ratio. Finally, we compare the dust reverberation radius with the near-infrared interferometric radius of the dust torus and the reverberation radius of broad Balmer emission lines. The interferometric radius in the K band was found to be systematically larger than the dust reverberation radius in the same band by about a factor of two, which could be interpreted by the difference between the flux-weighted radius and the response-weighted radius of the innermost dust torus. The reverberation radius of the broad Balmer emission lines was found to be systematically smaller than the dust reverberation radius by about a factor of 4-5, which strongly supports the unified scheme of the Seyfert type of active galactic nuclei. (Abridged)
  • We have pioneered a new method for the measurement of extragalactic distances. This method uses the time-lag between variations in the short wavelength and long wavelength light from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), based on a quantitative physical model of dust reverberation that relates the time-lag to the absolute luminosity of the AGN. We use the large homogeneous data set from intensive monitoring observations in optical and near-infrared wavelength bands with the dedicated 2-m MAGNUM telescope to obtain the distances to 17 AGNs in the redshift range z=0.0024 to z=0.0353. These distance measurements are compared with distances measured using Cepheid variable stars, and are used to infer that H_0= 73 +- 3 (random) km/s/Mpc. The systematic error in H_0 is examined, and the uncertainty in the size distribution of dust grains is the largest source of the systematic error, which is much reduced for a sample of AGNs for which their parameter values in the model of dust reverberation are individually measured. This AGN time-lag method can be used beyond 30 Mpc, the farthest distance reached by extragalactic Cepheids, and can be extended to high-redshift quasi-stellar objects.
  • The near-Earth asteroid (308635) 2005 YU55 is a potentially hazardous asteroid which was discovered in 2005 and passed Earth on November 8th 2011 at 0.85 lunar distances. This was the closest known approach by an asteroid of several hundred metre diameter since 1976 when a similar size object passed at 0.5 lunar distances. We observed 2005 YU55 from ground with a recently developed mid-IR camera (miniTAO/MAX38) in N- and Q-band and with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 1.3 mm. In addition, we obtained space observations with Herschel/PACS at 70, 100, and 160 micron. Our thermal measurements cover a wide range of wavelengths from 8.9 micron to 1.3 mm and were taken after opposition at phase angles between -97 deg and -18 deg. We performed a radiometric analysis via a thermophysical model and combined our derived properties with results from radar, adaptive optics, lightcurve observations, speckle and auxiliary thermal data. We find that (308635) 2005 YU55 has an almost spherical shape with an effective diameter of 300 to 312 m and a geometric albedo pV of 0.055 to 0.075. Its spin-axis is oriented towards celestial directions (lam_ecl, beta_ecl) = (60 deg +/- 30deg, -60 deg +/- 15 deg), which means it has a retrograde sense of rotation. The analysis of all available data combined revealed a discrepancy with the radar-derived size. Our radiometric analysis of the thermal data together with the problem to find a unique rotation period might be connected to a non-principal axis rotation. A low to intermediate level of surface roughness (r.m.s. of surface slopes in the range 0.1 - 0.3) is required to explain the available thermal measurements. We found a thermal inertia in the range 350-800 Jm^-2s^-0.5K^-1, very similar to the rubble-pile asteroid (25143) Itokawa and indicating a mixture of low conductivity fine regolith with larger rocks and boulders of high thermal inertia on the surface.
  • High resolution (0.4 arcsec) Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Cycle 0 observations of HCO+(4-3) and HCN(4-3) toward a mid-stage infrared bright merger VV114 have revealed compact nuclear (<200 pc) and extended (3 - 4 kpc) dense gas distribution across the eastern part of the galaxy pair. We find a significant enhancement of HCN(4-3) emission in an unresolved compact and broad (290km/s) component found in the eastern nucleus of VV114, and we suggest dense gas associated with the surrounding material around an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), with a mass upper limit of < 4 x 10^8 Msun. The extended dense gas is distributed along a filamentary structure with resolved dense gas concentrations (230pc; 10^6 Msun) separated by a mean projected distance of 600 pc, many of which are generally consistent with the location of star formation traced in Pa alpha emission. Radiative transfer calculations suggest moderately dense (10^5 - 10^6 cm^-3) gas averaged over the entire emission region. These new ALMA observations demonstrate the strength of the dense gas tracers in identifying both the AGN and star formation activity in a galaxy merger, even in the most dust enshrouded environments in the local universe.
  • In order to test a recent hypothesis that the dispersion in the Schmidt-Kennicutt law arises from variations in the evolutionary stage of star forming molecular clouds, we compared molecular gas and recent star formation in an early-phase merger galaxy pair, Taffy I (UGC\ 12915/UGC\ 12914, VV\ 254) which went through a direct collision 20 Myr ago and whose star forming regions are expected to have similar ages. Narrow-band Pa-alpha image is obtained using the ANIR near-infrared camera on the mini-TAO 1m telescope. The image enables us to derive accurate star formation rates within the galaxy directly. The total star formation rate, 22.2 M_sun/yr, was found to be much higher than previous estimates. Ages of individual star forming blobs estimated from equivalent widths indicate that most star forming regions are ~7 Myr old, except for a giant HII region at the bridge which is much younger. Comparison between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for the regions with the same age exhibits a surprisingly tight correlation, a slope of unity, and star formation efficiencies comparable to those of starburst galaxies. These results suggest that Taffy I has just evolved into a starburst system after the collision, and the star forming sites are at a similar stage in their evolution from natal molecular clouds except for the bridge region. The tight Schmidt-Kennicutt law supports the scenario that dispersion in the star formation law is in large part due to differences in evolutionary stage of star forming regions.
  • We present observations and analysis of the broadband afterglow of Swift GRB 071025. Using optical and infrared (RIYJHK) photometry, we derive a photometric redshift of 4.4 < z < 5.2; at this redshift our simultaneous multicolour observations begin at ~30 s after the GRB trigger in the host frame and during the initial rising phase of the afterglow. We associate the light curve peak at 580 s in the observer frame with the formation of the forward shock, giving an estimate of the initial Lorentz factor Gamma_0 ~ 200. The red spectral energy distribution (even in regions not affected by the Lyman-alpha break) provides secure evidence of a large dust column. However, the inferred extinction curve shows a prominent flat component between 2000-3000 Angstroms in the rest-frame, inconsistent with any locally observed template but well-fit by models of dust formed by supernovae. Time-dependent fits to the extinction profile reveal no evidence of dust destruction and limit the decrease in the extinction column to Delta A_3000 < 0.54 mag after t = 50 s in the rest frame. Our observations provide evidence of a transition in dust properties at z~5, in agreement with studies of high-z quasars, and suggest that SN-formed dust continues to dominate the opacity of typical galaxies at this redshift.
  • (Abridged) We present a two month Suzaku X-ray monitoring of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. The campaign consists of 7 observations. We analyze the response in the opacity of the gas that forms the ionized absorber to ionizing flux variations. Despite variations by a factor of 4 in the impinging continuum, the soft X-ray spectra of the source show little spectral variations, suggesting no response from the ionized absorber. A detailed time modeling confirms the lack of opacity variations for an absorbing component with high ionization. Instead, the models tentatively suggest that the ionization parameter of a low ionization absorbing component might be changing with the ionizing flux, as expected for gas in photoionization equilibrium. Using the lack of variations, we set an upper limit of n_e <2.0E7 cm-3 for the electron density of the gas forming the high ionization, high velocity component. This implies a large distance from the continuum source (R > 0.033 pc). If the variations in the low ionization component are real, they imply n_e >9.8E4 cm-3 and R < 3 pc. We discuss our results in terms of two different scenarios: a large scale outflow originating in the inner parts of the accretion disk, or a thermally driven wind originating much farther out. Given the large distance of the wind, the implied mass outflow rate is also large (Mw > 0.08 Maccr). The associated total kinetic energy deployed by the wind in the host galaxy (>1.2E56 erg) can be enough to disrupt the interstellar medium, possibly regulating large scale star formation. The total mass and energy ejected by the wind is still lower than the one required for cosmic feedback, even when extrapolated to quasar luminosities. Such feedback would require that we are observing the wind before it is fully accelerated.
  • We discuss the origin of the optical variations in the Narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051 and present the results of a cross-correlation study using X-ray and optical light curves spanning more than 12 years. The emission is highly variable in all wavebands, and the amplitude of the optical variations is found to be smaller than that of the X-rays, even after correcting for the contaminating host galaxy flux falling inside the photometric aperture. The optical power spectrum is best described by an unbroken power law model with slope $\alpha=1.4^{+0.6}_{-0.2}$ and displays lower variability power than the 2-10 keV X-rays on all time-scales probed. We find the light curves to be significantly correlated at an optical delay of $1.2^{+1.0}_{-0.3}$ days behind the X-rays. This time-scale is consistent with the light travel time to the optical emitting region of the accretion disc, suggesting that the optical variations are driven by X-ray reprocessing. We show, however, that a model whereby the optical variations arise from reprocessing by a flat accretion disc cannot account for all the optical variability. There is also a second significant peak in the cross-correlation function, at an optical delay of $39^{+2.7}_{-8.4}$ days. The lag is consistent with the dust sublimation radius in this source, suggesting that there is a measurable amount of optical flux coming from the dust torus. We discuss the origin of the additional optical flux in terms of reprocessing of X-rays and reflection of optical light by the dust.
  • We present the detailed optical to far-infrared observations of SST J1604+4304, an ULIRG at z = 1.135. Analyzing the stellar absorption lines, namely, the CaII H & K and Balmer H lines in the optical spectrum, we derive the upper limits of an age for the stellar population. Given this constraint, the minimum {chi}^2 method is used to fit the stellar population models to the observed SED from 0.44 to 5.8um. We find the following properties. The stellar population has an age 40 - 200 Myr with a metallicity 2.5 Z_{sun}. The starlight is reddened by E(B-V) = 0.8. The reddening is caused by the foreground dust screen, indicating that dust is depleted in the starburst site and the starburst site is surrounded by a dust shell. The infrared (8-1000um) luminosity is L_{ir} = 1.78 +/- 0.63 * 10^{12} L_{sun}. This is two times greater than that expected from the observed starlight, suggesting either that 1/2 of the starburst site is completely obscured at UV-optical wavelengths, or that 1/2 of L_{ir} comes from AGN emission. The inferred dust mass is 2.0 +/- 1.0 * 10^8 M_{sun}. This is sufficient to form a shell surrounding the galaxy with an optical depth E(B-V) = 0.8. From our best stellar population model - an instantaneous starburst with an age 40 Myr, we infer the rate of 19 supernovae(SNe) per year. Simply analytical models imply that 2.5 Z_{sun} in stars was reached when the gas mass reduced to 30% of the galaxy mass. The gas metallcity is 4.8 Z_{sun} at this point. The gas-to-dust mass ratio is then 120 +/- 73. The inferred dust production rate is 0.24 +/- 0.12 M_{sun} per SN. If 1/2 of L_{ir} comes from AGN emission, the rate is 0.48 +/- 0.24 M_{sun} per SN. We discuss the evolutionary link of SST J1604+4304 to other galaxy populations in terms of the stellar masses and the galactic winds.
  • We present the first results from a high sampling rate, multi-month reverberation mapping campaign undertaken primarily at MDM Observatory with supporting observations from telescopes around the world. The primary goal of this campaign was to obtain either new or improved Hbeta reverberation lag measurements for several relatively low luminosity AGNs. We feature results for NGC 4051 here because, until now, this object has been a significant outlier from AGN scaling relationships, e.g., it was previously a ~2-3sigma outlier on the relationship between the broad-line region (BLR) radius and the optical continuum luminosity - the R_BLR-L relationship. Our new measurements of the lag time between variations in the continuum and Hbeta emission line made from spectroscopic monitoring of NGC 4051 lead to a measured BLR radius of R_BLR = 1.87 (+0.54 -0.50) light days and black hole mass of M_BH = 1.73 (+0.55 -0.52) x 10^6 M_sun. This radius is consistent with that expected from the R_BLR-L relationship, based on the present luminosity of NGC 4051 and the most current calibration of the relation by Bentz et al. (2009a). We also present a preliminary look at velocity-resolved Hbeta light curves and time delay measurements, although we are unable to reconstruct an unambiguous velocity-resolved reverberation signal.
  • We consider a natural generalization of both locally finite irreducible root systems and extended affine root systems defined by Saito. We classify the systems.
  • We present a theoretical model for supernova (SN) 2008D associated with the luminous X-ray transient 080109. The bolometric light curve and optical spectra of the SN are modelled based on the progenitor models and the explosion models obtained from hydrodynamic/nucleosynthetic calculations. We find that SN 2008D is a more energetic explosion than normal core-collapse supernovae, with an ejecta mass of Mej = 5.3 +- 1.0 Msun and a kinetic energy of E = 6.0 +- 2.5 x 10^{51} erg. The progenitor star of the SN has a 6-8 Msun He core with essentially no H envelope (< 5 x 10^{-4} Msun) prior to the explosion. The main-sequence mass of the progenitor is estimated to be Mms =20-25 Msun, with additional systematic uncertainties due to convection, mass loss, rotation, and binary effects. These properties are intermediate between those of normal SNe and hypernovae associated with gamma-ray bursts. The mass of the central remnant is estimated as 1.6 - 1.8 Msun, which is near the boundary between neutron star and black hole formation.
  • We present a theoretical model for Type Ib supernova (SN) 2006jc. We calculate the evolution of the progenitor star, hydrodynamics and nucleosynthesis of the SN explosion, and the SN bolometric light curve (LC). The synthetic bolometric LC is compared with the observed bolometric LC constructed by integrating the UV, optical, near-infrared (NIR), and mid-infrared (MIR) fluxes. The progenitor is assumed to be as massive as $40M_\odot$ on the zero-age main-sequence. The star undergoes extensive mass loss to reduce its mass down to as small as $6.9M_\odot$, thus becoming a WCO Wolf-Rayet star. The WCO star model has a thick carbon-rich layer, in which amorphous carbon grains can be formed. This could explain the NIR brightening and the dust feature seen in the MIR spectrum. We suggest that the progenitor of SN 2006jc is a WCO Wolf-Rayet star having undergone strong mass loss and such massive stars are the important sites of dust formation. We derive the parameters of the explosion model in order to reproduce the bolometric LC of SN 2006jc by the radioactive decays: the ejecta mass $4.9M_\odot$, hypernova-like explosion energy $10^{52}$ ergs, and ejected $^{56}$Ni mass $0.22M_\odot$. We also calculate the circumstellar interaction and find that a CSM with a flat density structure is required to reproduce the X-ray LC of SN 2006jc. This suggests a drastic change of the mass-loss rate and/or the wind velocity that is consistent with the past luminous blue variable (LBV)-like event.
  • We present our latest results on near- to mid- infrared observation of SN2006jc at 200 days after the discovery using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board $AKARI$. The near-infrared (2--5$\mu$m) spectrum of SN2006jc is obtained for the first time and is found to be well interpreted in terms of the thermal emission from amorphous carbon of 800$\pm 10$K with the mass of $6.9\pm 0.5 \times 10^{-5}M_{\odot}$ that was formed in the supernova ejecta. This dust mass newly formed in the ejecta of SN 2006jc is in a range similar to those obtained for other several dust forming core collapse supernovae based on recent observations (i.e., $10^{-3}$--$10^{-5}$$M_{\odot}$). Mid-infrared photometric data with {\it{AKARI}}/IRC MIR-S/S7, S9W, and S11 bands have shown excess emission over the thermal emission by hot amorphous carbon of 800K. This mid-infrared excess emission is likely to be accounted for by the emission from warm amorphous carbon dust of 320$\pm 10$K with the mass of 2.7$^{+0.7}_{-0.5} \times 10^{-3}M_{\odot}$ rather than by the band emission of astronomical silicate and/or silica grains. This warm amorphous carbon dust is expected to have been formed in the mass loss wind associated with the Wolf-Rayet stellar activity before the SN explosion. Our result suggests that a significant amount of dust is condensed in the mass loss wind prior to the SN explosion. A possible contribution of emission bands by precursory SiO molecules in 7.5--9.5$\mu$m is also suggested.
  • We present results from Chandra observations of SDSS J1004+4112, a strongly lensed quasar system with a maximum image separation of 15". All four bright images of the quasar, as well as resolved X-ray emission originating from the lensing cluster, are clearly detected. The emission from the lensing cluster extends out to approximately 1.5 arcmin. We measure the bolometric X-ray luminosity and temperature of the lensing cluster to be 4.7e44 erg s^-1 and 6.4 keV, consistent with the luminosity-temperature relation for distant clusters. The mass estimated from the X-ray observation shows excellent agreement with the mass derived from gravitational lensing. The X-ray flux ratios of the quasar images differ markedly from the optical flux ratios, and the combined X-ray spectrum of the images possesses an unusually strong Fe Kalpha emission line, both of which are indicative of microlensing.
  • We carried out a one-night optical V and near-infrared JHK monitoring observation of the least luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy, NGC4395, on 2004 May 1, and detected for the first time the intraday flux variations in the J and H bands, while such variation was not clearly seen for the K band. The detected J and H variations are synchronized with the flux variation in the V band, which indicates that the intraday-variable component of near-infrared continuum emission of the NGC4395 nucleus is an extension of power-law continuum emission to the near-infrared and originates in an outer region of the central accretion disk. On the other hand, from our regular program of long-term optical BVI and near-infrared JHK monitoring observation of NGC4395 from 2004 February 12 until 2005 January 22, we found large flux variations in all the bands on time scales of days to months. The optical BVI variations are almost synchronized with each other, but not completely with the near-infrared JHK variations. The color temperature of the near-infrared variable component is estimated to be T=1320-1710 K, in agreement with thermal emission from hot dust tori in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We therefore conclude that the near-infrared variation consists of two components having different time scales, so that a small K-flux variation on a time scale of a few hours would possibly be veiled by large variation of thermal dust emission on a time scale of days.
  • We report near simultaneous multi-color (RIYJHK) observations made with the MAGNUM 2m telescope of the gamma ray burst GRB 050904 detected by the SWIFT satellite. The spectral energy distribution shows a very large break between the I and J bands. Using intergalactic transmissions measured from high redshift quasars we show that the observations place a 95% confidence lower limit of z=6.18 on the object, consistent with a later measured spectroscopic redshift of 6.29 obtained by Kawai et al. (2005) with the Subaru telescope. We show that the break strength in the R and I bands is consistent with that measured in the quasars. Finally we consider the implications for the star formation history at high redshift.
  • Observations and modeling for the light curve (LC) and spectra of supernova (SN) 2005bf are reported. This SN showed unique features: the LC had two maxima, and declined rapidly after the second maximum, while the spectra showed strengthening He lines whose velocity increased with time. The double-peaked LC can be reproduced by a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, with most $^{56}$Ni at low velocity and a small amount at high velocity. The rapid post-maximum decline requires a large fraction of the $\gamma$-rays to escape from the $^{56}$Ni-dominated region, possibly because of low-density ``holes''. The presence of Balmer lines in the spectrum suggests that the He layer of the progenitor was substantially intact. Increasing $\gamma$-ray deposition in the He layer due to enhanced $\gamma$-ray escape from the $^{56}$Ni-dominated region may explain both the delayed strengthening and the increasing velocity of the He lines. The SN has massive ejecta ($\sim6-7\Msun$), normal kinetic energy ($\sim 1.0-1.5\times 10^{51}$ ergs), high peak bolometric luminosity ($\sim 5\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$) for an epoch as late as $\sim$ 40 days, and a large $^{56}$Ni mass ($\sim0.32\Msun$). These properties, and the presence of a small amount of H suggest that the progenitor was initially massive (M$\sim 25-30 \Msun$) and had lost most of its H envelope, and was possibly a WN star. The double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution suggests that the explosion may have formed jets that did not reach the He layer. The properties of SN 2005bf resemble those of the explosion of Cassiopeia A.
  • We describe the discovery of HE 1327-2326, a dwarf or subgiant with [Fe/H]}=-5.4. The star was found in a sample of bright metal-poor stars selected from the Hamburg/ESO survey. Its abundance pattern is characterized by very high C and N abundances. The detection of Sr which is overabundant by a factor of 10 as compared to iron and the Sun, suggests that neutron-capture elements had already been produced in the very early Galaxy. A puzzling Li depletion is observed in this unevolved star which contradicts the value of the primordial Li derived from WMAP and other Li studies. Possible scenarios for the origin of the abundance pattern (Pop. II or Pop. III) are presented as well as an outlook on future observations.
  • We present the elemental abundances of HE1327-2326, the most iron-deficient star known, determined from a comprehensive analysis of spectra obtained with the Subaru Telescope High Dispersion Spectrograph.
  • We present optical, near-IR, and radio follow up of sixteen Swift bursts, including our discovery of nine afterglows and a redshift determination for three. These observations, supplemented by data from the literature, provide an afterglow recovery rate of 60% in the optical/near-IR, much higher than in previous missions (BeppoSAX, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, and IPN). The optical/near-IR afterglows of Swift events are on average 1.7 mag fainter at t=12 hr than those of previous missions. The X-ray afterglows are similarly fainter compared to those of pre-Swift bursts. In the radio the limiting factor is the VLA threshold and the detection rate for Swift bursts is similar to that for past missions. The redshift distribution of pre-Swift bursts peaked at z~1, whereas the five Swift bursts with measured redshifts are distributed evenly between 1.3 and 3.2. From these results we conclude that (i) the pre-Swift distributions were biased in favor of bright events and low redshift events, (ii) the higher sensitivity and accurate positions of Swift result in a better representation of the true burst redshift and brightness distributions (which are higher and dimmer, respectively), and (iii) as many as 1/3 of the bursts can be optically dark, as a result of a high redshift and/or dust extinction. We remark that the apparent lack of low redshift, low luminosity Swift bursts, and the lower event rate compared to pre-launch estimates (90 vs. 150 per year), are the result of a threshold that is similar to that of BATSE. In view of these inferences, afterglow observers may find it advisable to make significant changes in follow up strategies of Swift events. [abridged]
  • Optical and near-infrared observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 031203, at z = 0.1055, are reported. A very faint afterglow is detected superimposed to the host galaxy in our first infrared JHK observations, carried out ~9 hours after the burst. Subsequently, a rebrightening is detected in all bands, peaking in the R band about 18 rest-frame days after the burst. The rebrightening closely resembles the light curve of a supernova like SN 1998bw, assuming that the GRB and the SN went off almost simultaneously, but with a somewhat slower evolution. Spectra taken close to the maximum of the rebrightening show extremely broad features as in SN 1998bw. The determination of the absolute magnitude of this SN (SN 2003lw) is difficult owing to the large and uncertain extinction, but likely this event was brighter than SN 1998bw by 0.5 mag in the VRI bands, reaching an absolute magnitude M_V = -19.75+-0.15.
  • Optical spectroscopy of the Type Ia supernova SN 2002ic obtained on 2003 June 27.6 UT, i.e., about 222 rest-frame days after explosion, is presented. Strong H emission indicates an interaction between the expanding SN ejecta and an H-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). The spectrum of SN 2002ic resembles those of SNe 1997cy and 1999E. The three SNe also have similar luminosities, suggesting that they are the same phenomenon and that the CSM is also similar. We propose a new classification, Type IIa SNe, for these events. The observed line profiles and line ratios are measured and discussed within the ejecta-CSM interaction scenario. The emission in H Balmer, [O III], and He I lines, and in permitted Fe II blends, resembles the spectra of the Type IIn SN 1987F and of Seyfert 1 galaxies. A high-density, clumpy CSM is inferred. Strong, very broad [Ca II]/Ca II and [O I]/O I missions imply that not all the outer SN ejecta were decelerated in the interaction, suggesting that the CSM is aspherical.
  • The most intense monitoring observations yet made were carried out on the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151 in the optical and near-infrared wave-bands. A lag from the optical light curve to the near-infrared light curve was measured. The lag-time between the V and K light curves at the flux minimum in 2001 was precisely 48+2-3 days, as determined by a cross-correlation analysis. The correlation between the optical luminosity of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and the lag-time between the UV/optical and the near-infrared light curves is presented for NGC 4151 in combination with previous lag-time measurements of NGC 4151 and other AGNs in the literature. This correlation is interpreted as thermal dust reverberation in an AGN, where the near-infrared emission from an AGN is expected to be the thermal re-radiation from hot dust surrounding the central engine at a radius where the temperature equals to that of the dust sublimation temperature. We find that the inner radius of the dust torus in NGC 4151 is $\sim $ 0.04 pc corresponding to the measured lag-time, well outside the broad line region (BLR) determined by other reverberation studies of the emission lines.