• By a small-size complex network of coupled chaotic Hindmarsh-Rose circuits, we study experimentally the stability of network synchronization to the removal of shortcut links. It is shown that the removal of a single shortcut link may destroy either completely or partially the network synchronization. Interestingly, when the network is partially desynchronized, it is found that the oscillators can be organized into different groups, with oscillators within each group being highly synchronized but are not for oscillators from different groups, showing the intriguing phenomenon of cluster synchronization. The experimental results are analyzed by the method of eigenvalue analysis, which implies that the formation of cluster synchronization is crucially dependent on the network symmetries. Our study demonstrates the observability of cluster synchronization in realistic systems, and indicates the feasibility of controlling network synchronization by adjusting network topology.
  • Dynamical patterns in complex networks of coupled oscillators are both of theoretical and practical interest, yet to fully reveal and understand the interplay between pattern emergence and network structure remains to be an outstanding problem. A fundamental issue is the effect of network structure on the stability of the patterns. We address this issue by using the setting where random links are systematically added to a regular lattice and focusing on the dynamical evolution of spiral wave patterns. As the network structure deviates more from the regular topology (so that it becomes increasingly more complex), the original stable spiral wave pattern can disappear and a different type of pattern can emerge. Our main findings are the following. (1) Short-distance links added to a small region containing the spiral tip can have a more significant effect on the wave pattern than long-distance connections. (2) As more random links are introduced into the network, distinct pattern transitions can occur, which include the transition of spiral wave to global synchronization, to a chimera-like state, and then to a pinned spiral wave. (3) Around the transitions the network dynamics is highly sensitive to small variations in the network structure in the sense that the addition of even a single link can change the pattern from one type to another. These findings provide insights into the pattern dynamics in complex networks, a problem that is relevant to many physical, chemical, and biological systems.
  • Two dimensional (2D) semiconductor materials of transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) manifest many peculiar physical phenomena in the light-matter interaction. Due to their ultrathin property, strong interaction with light and the robust excitons at room temperature, they provide a perfect platform for studying the physics of strong coupling in low dimension and at room temperature. Here we report the strong coupling between 2D semiconductor excitons and Tamm plasmon polaritons (TPPs). We observe a Rabi splitting of about 54 meV at room temperature by measuring the angle resolved differential reflectivity spectra and simulate the theoretical results by using the transfer matrix method. Our results will promote the realization of the TPP based ultrathin polariton devices at room temperature.
  • To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands or grows. A network in the real world can never be completely synchronized due to noise and/or external disturbances. This is especially the case when, mathematically, the transient synchronous state during the growth process becomes marginally stable, as a local perturbation can trigger a rapid deviation of the system from the vicinity of the synchronous state. In terms of the nodal dynamics, a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverge from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a short time period. Because of the high dimensionality of the networked system, the transient process for the system to recover to the synchronous state can be extremely long. Introducing a tolerance threshold to identify the desynchronized nodes, we find that, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis indicates that, the distribution of the size of the collapse is approximately algebraic (power law), regardless of the fluctuations in the system parameters. This is indication of the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis.