• We discuss the progress in integration of nanodiamonds with photonic devices for quantum optics applications. Experimental results in GaP, SiO2 and SiC-nanodiamond platforms show that various regimes of light and matter interaction can be achieved by engineering color center systems through hybrid approaches. We present our recent results on the growth of color center-rich nanodiamond on prefabricated 3C-SiC microdisk resonators. These hybrid devices achieve up to five-fold enhancement of diamond color center light emission and can be employed for integrated quantum photonics.
  • We demonstrate cavity-enhanced Raman emission from a single atomic defect in a solid. Our platform is a single silicon-vacancy center in diamond coupled with a monolithic diamond photonic crystal cavity. The cavity enables an unprecedented frequency tuning range of the Raman emission (100 GHz) that significantly exceeds the spectral inhomogeneity of silicon-vacancy centers in diamond nanostructures. We also show that the cavity selectively suppresses the phonon-induced spontaneous emission that degrades the efficiency of Raman photon generation. Our results pave the way towards photon-mediated many-body interactions between solid-state quantum emitters in a nanophotonic platform.
  • Efficiently exciting the Nitrogen-Vacancy color-center in a diamond with a green light and collecting the emitted near-infrared fluorescence is critical for spin-based quantum sensing at room temperatures. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a simple and robust fiber-optics based method to achieve simultaneously efficient excitation and fluorescence collection. Fiber optic systems usually have limited Numerical Aperture (NA) while our method mitigates this "bottleneck". We use a simple technique to fabricate a suitable micro-concave mirror that focuses the scattered excitation laser beam back into the diamond located at the focal point of the mirror. At the same instance, the mirror also couples back the fluorescence light exiting out of the diamond opposite the direction of the optical fiber into the optical fiber within its light acceptance cone, otherwise, it would have been lost. Our proof-of-principle demonstration achieves a 25 times improvement in fluorescence collection compared to not using any mirror. Additionally, we made the NV sensor system compact by replaced some bulky optical elements in the optical path with a 1x2 fiber optical coupler in our optical system. In addition to reducing the complexity of the system, this also provides portability and robustness, these added features potentially promote unique application fields those were previously inaccessible.
  • Quantum emitters are an integral component for a broad range of quantum technologies including quantum communication, quantum repeaters, and linear optical quantum computation. Solid-state color centers are promising candidates for scalable quantum optics due to their long coherence time and small inhomogeneous broadening. However, once excited, color centers often decay through phonon-assisted processes, limiting the efficiency of single photon generation and photon mediated entanglement generation. Herein, we demonstrate strong enhancement of spontaneous emission rate of a single silicon-vacancy center in diamond embedded within a monolithic optical cavity, reaching a regime where the excited state lifetime is dominated by spontaneous emission into the cavity mode. We observe 10-fold lifetime reduction and 42-fold enhancement in emission intensity when the cavity is tuned into resonance with the optical transition of a single silicon-vacancy center, corresponding to 90% of the excited state energy decay occurring through spontaneous emission into the cavity mode. We also demonstrate the largest to date coupling strength ($g/2\pi=4.9\pm0.3 GHz$) and cooperativity ($C=1.4$) for color-center-based cavity quantum electrodynamics systems, bringing the system closer to the strong coupling regime.
  • Arrays of identical and individually addressable qubits lay the foundation for the creation of scalable quantum hardware such as quantum processors and repeaters. Silicon vacancy centers in diamond (SiV) offer excellent physical properties such as low inhomogeneous broadening, fast photon emission, and a large Debye-Waller factor, while the possibility for all-optical ultrafast manipulation and techniques to extend the spin coherence times make them very promising candidates for qubits. Here, we have developed arrays of nanopillars containing single SiV centers with high yield, and we demonstrate ultrafast all-optical complete coherent control of the state of a single SiV center. The high quality of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown SiV centers provides excellent spectral stability, which allows us to coherently manipulate and quasi-resonantly read out the state of individual SiV centers on picosecond timescales using ultrafast optical pulses. This work opens new opportunities towards the creation of a scalable on-chip diamond platform for quantum information processing and scalable nanophotonics applications.