• The degree splitting problem requires coloring the edges of a graph red or blue such that each node has almost the same number of edges in each color, up to a small additive discrepancy. The directed variant of the problem requires orienting the edges such that each node has almost the same number of incoming and outgoing edges, again up to a small additive discrepancy. We present deterministic distributed algorithms for both variants, which improve on their counterparts presented by Ghaffari and Su [SODA'17]: our algorithms are significantly simpler and faster, and have a much smaller discrepancy. This also leads to a faster and simpler deterministic algorithm for $(2+o(1))\Delta$-edge-coloring, improving on that of Ghaffari and Su.
  • We present a randomized distributed algorithm that computes a $\Delta$-coloring in any non-complete graph with maximum degree $\Delta \geq 4$ in $O(\log \Delta) + 2^{O(\sqrt{\log\log n})}$ rounds, as well as a randomized algorithm that computes a $\Delta$-coloring in $O((\log \log n)^2)$ rounds when $\Delta \in [3, O(1)]$. Both these algorithms improve on an $O(\log^3 n/\log \Delta)$-round algorithm of Panconesi and Srinivasan~[STOC'1993], which has remained the state of the art for the past 25 years. Moreover, the latter algorithm gets (exponentially) closer to an $\Omega(\log\log n)$ round lower bound of Brandt et al.~[STOC'16].
  • The present paper studies local distributed graph problems in highly dynamic networks. We define a (in our view) natural generalization of static graph problems to the dynamic graph setting. For some parameter $T>0$, the set of admissible outputs of nodes in a $T$-dynamic solution for a given graph problem at some time $t$ is defined by the dynamic graph topology in the time interval $[t-T,t]$. The guarantees of a $T$-dynamic solution become stronger the more stable the graph remains during the interval $[t-T,t]$ and they coincide with the definition of the static graph problem if the graph is static throughout the interval. We further present an abstract framework that allows to develop distributed algorithms for a given dynamic graph problem. For some $T>0$, the algorithms always output a valid $T$-dynamic solution of the given graph problem. Further, if a constant neighborhood around some part of the graph is stable during an interval $[t_1,t_2]$, the algorithms compute a static solution for this part of the graph throughout the interval $[t_1+T',t_2]$ for some $T'>0$. Ideally $T$ and $T'$ are of the same asymptotic order as the time complexity for solving the given graph problem in static networks. We apply our generic framework to two classic distributed symmetry breaking problems: the problem of computing a (degree+1)-vertex coloring and the problem of computing a maximal independent set (MIS) of the network graph. For both problems, we obtain distributed algorithms that always output a valid $O(\log n)$-dynamic solution. Further, if some part of the graph and its $O(1)$-neighborhood remain stable for some interval $[t_1,t_2]$, for the given part of the graph, the algorithms compute a valid static solution for the two problems that remains stable throughout an interval $[t_1+O(\log n),t_2]$.
  • The algorithmic small-world phenomenon, empirically established by Milgram's letter forwarding experiments from the 60s, was theoretically explained by Kleinberg in 2000. However, from today's perspective his model has several severe shortcomings that limit the applicability to real-world networks. In order to give a more convincing explanation of the algorithmic small-world phenomenon, we study decentralized greedy routing in a more flexible random graph model (geometric inhomogeneous random graphs) which overcomes all previous shortcomings. Apart from exhibiting good properties in theory, it has also been extensively experimentally validated that this model reasonably captures real-world networks. In this model, the greedy routing protocol is purely distributed as each vertex only needs to know information about its direct neighbors. We prove that it succeeds with constant probability, and in case of success almost surely finds an almost shortest path of length {\theta}(loglog n), where our bound is tight including the leading constant. Moreover, we study natural local patching methods which augment greedy routing by backtracking and which do not require any global knowledge. We show that such methods can ensure success probability 1 in an asymptotically tight number of steps. These results also address the question of Krioukov et al. whether there are efficient local routing protocols for the internet graph. There were promising experimental studies, but the question remained unsolved theoretically. Our results give for the first time a rigorous and analytical affirmative answer.
  • This paper is centered on the complexity of graph problems in the well-studied LOCAL model of distributed computing, introduced by Linial [FOCS '87]. It is widely known that for many of the classic distributed graph problems (including maximal independent set (MIS) and $(\Delta+1)$-vertex coloring), the randomized complexity is at most polylogarithmic in the size $n$ of the network, while the best deterministic complexity is typically $2^{O(\sqrt{\log n})}$. Understanding and narrowing down this exponential gap is considered to be one of the central long-standing open questions in the area of distributed graph algorithms. We investigate the problem by introducing a complexity-theoretic framework that allows us to shed some light on the role of randomness in the LOCAL model. We define the SLOCAL model as a sequential version of the LOCAL model. Our framework allows us to prove completeness results with respect to the class of problems which can be solved efficiently in the SLOCAL model, implying that if any of the complete problems can be solved deterministically in $\log^{O(1)} n$ rounds in the LOCAL model, we can deterministically solve all efficient SLOCAL-problems (including MIS and $(\Delta+1)$-coloring) in $\log^{O(1)} n$ rounds in the LOCAL model. We show that a rather rudimentary looking graph coloring problem is complete in the above sense: Color the nodes of a graph with colors red and blue such that each node of sufficiently large polylogarithmic degree has at least one neighbor of each color. The problem admits a trivial zero-round randomized solution. The result can be viewed as showing that the only obstacle to getting efficient determinstic algorithms in the LOCAL model is an efficient algorithm to approximately round fractional values into integer values.
  • We show an $\Omega\big(\Delta^{\frac{1}{3}-\frac{\eta}{3}}\big)$ lower bound on the runtime of any deterministic distributed $\mathcal{O}\big(\Delta^{1+\eta}\big)$-graph coloring algorithm in a weak variant of the \LOCAL\ model. In particular, given a network graph \mbox{$G=(V,E)$}, in the weak \LOCAL\ model nodes communicate in synchronous rounds and they can use unbounded local computation. We assume that the nodes have no identifiers, but that instead, the computation starts with an initial valid vertex coloring. A node can \textbf{broadcast} a \textbf{single} message of \textbf{unbounded} size to its neighbors and receives the \textbf{set of messages} sent to it by its neighbors. That is, if two neighbors of a node $v\in V$ send the same message to $v$, $v$ will receive this message only a single time; without any further knowledge, $v$ cannot know whether a received message was sent by only one or more than one neighbor. Neighborhood graphs have been essential in the proof of lower bounds for distributed coloring algorithms, e.g., \cite{linial92,Kuhn2006On}. Our proof analyzes the recursive structure of the neighborhood graph of the respective model to devise an $\Omega\big(\Delta^{\frac{1}{3}-\frac{\eta}{3}}\big)$ lower bound on the runtime for any deterministic distributed $\mathcal{O}\big(\Delta^{1+\eta}\big)$-graph coloring algorithm. Furthermore, we hope that the proof technique improves the understanding of neighborhood graphs in general and that it will help towards finding a lower (runtime) bound for distributed graph coloring in the standard \LOCAL\ model. Our proof technique works for one-round algorithms in the standard \LOCAL\ model and provides a simpler and more intuitive proof for an existing $\Omega(\Delta^2)$ lower bound.
  • A bounded, Riemann integrable and measurable set $K\subset \mathbb{R}^d$, which fulfills \[\sum\limits_{\gamma\in\Gamma}\mathbb{1}_K(x-\gamma)=k\text{ almost everywhere, $x\in\mathbb{R}^d$}\] for a lattice $\Gamma\subset\mathbb{R}^d$ is called $k$-tiling. If $K\subset\mathbb{R}^d$ is $k$-tiling $L^2(K)$ will admit a Riesz basis of exponentials. We use this result to construct generalized Riesz wavelet bases of $L^2(\mathbb{R}^2)$, arising from the action of suitable subsets of the affine group. One example of our construction is the first known shearlet Riesz basis.
  • In the classic gossip-based model of communication for disseminating information in a network, in each time unit, every node $u$ is allowed to contact a single random neighbor $v$. If $u$ knows the data (rumor) to be disseminated, it disperses it to $v$ (known as PUSH) and if it does not, it requests it from $v$ (known as PULL). While in the classic gossip model, each node is only allowed to contact a single neighbor in each time unit, each node can possibly be contacted by many neighboring nodes. In the present paper, we consider a restricted model where at each node only one incoming request can be served. As long as only a single piece of information needs to be disseminated, this does not make a difference for push requests. It however has a significant effect on pull requests. In the paper, we therefore concentrate on this weaker pull version, which we call 'restricted pull'. We distinguish two versions of the restricted pull protocol depending on whether the request to be served among a set of pull requests at a given node is chosen adversarially or uniformly at random. As a first result, we prove an exponential separation between the two variants. We show that there are instances where if an adversary picks the request to be served, the restricted pull protocol requires a polynomial number of rounds whereas if the winning request is chosen uniformly at random, the restricted pull protocol only requires a polylogarithmic number of rounds to inform the whole network. Further, as the main technical contribution, we show that if the request to be served is chosen randomly, the slowdown of using restricted pull versus using the classic pull protocol can w.h.p. be upper bounded by $O(\Delta / \delta \log n)$, where $\Delta$ and $\delta$ are the largest and smallest degree of the network.