• Distributed coordination algorithms (DCA) carry out information processing processes among a group of networked agents without centralized information fusion. Though it is well known that DCA characterized by an SIA (stochastic, indecomposable, aperiodic) matrix generate consensus asymptotically via synchronous iterations, the dynamics of DCA with asynchronous iterations have not been studied extensively, especially when viewed as stochastic processes. This paper aims to show that for any given irreducible stochastic matrix, even non-SIA, the corresponding DCA lead to consensus successfully via random asynchronous iterations under a wide range of conditions on the transition probability. Particularly, the transition probability is neither required to be independent and identically distributed, nor characterized by a Markov chain.
  • Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves, spectacular horizontally propagating disturbances in the low solar corona, always trigger horizontal secondary waves (SWs) when they encounter ambient coronal structure. We present a first example of upward SWs in a streamer-like structure after the passing of an EUV wave. The event occurred on 2017 June 1. The EUV wave happened during a typical solar eruption including a filament eruption, a CME, a C6.6 flare. The EUV wave was associated with quasi-periodic fast propagating (QFP) wave trains and a type II radio burst that represented the existence of a coronal shock. The EUV wave had a fast initial velocity of $\sim$1000 km s$^{-1}$, comparable to high speeds of the shock and the QFP wave trains. Intriguingly, upward SWs rose slowly ($\sim$80 km s$^{-1}$) in the streamer-like structure after the sweeping of the EUV wave. The upward SWs seemed to originate from limb brightenings that were caused by the EUV wave. All the results show the EUV wave is a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic shock wave, likely triggered by the flare impulses. We suggest that part of the EUV wave was probably trapped in the closed magnetic fields of streamer-like structure, and upward SWs possibly resulted from the release of trapped waves in the form of slow-mode. It is believed that an interplay of the strong compression of the coronal shock and the configuration of the streamer-like structure is crucial for the formation of upward SWs.
  • We report the latest results of searching for possible new macro-scale spin-spin-velocity-dependent forces (SSVDFs) based on specially designed iron-shielded SmCo$_5$ (ISSC) spin sources and a spin exchange relaxation free (SERF) co-magnetometer. The ISSCs have high net electron spin densities of about $1.7\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-3}$, which mean high detecting sensitivity; and low magnetic field leakage of about $\sim$mG level due to iron shielding, which means low detecting noise. With help from the ISSCs, the high sensitivity SERF co-magnetometer, and the similarity analysis method, new constraints on SSVDFs with forms of $V_{6+7}$, $V_8$, $V_{15}$, and $V_{16}$ have been obtained, which represent the tightest limits in force range of 5 cm -- 1 km to the best of our knowledge.
  • This paper presents the latest observations from the newly-built solar radio spectrograph at the \emph{Chashan Solar Observatory}. On July 18 2016, the spectrograph records a solar spike burst event, which has several episodes showing harmonic structures, with the second, third, and fourth harmonics. The lower harmonic radio spike emissions are observed later than the higher harmonic bands, and the temporal delay of the second (third) harmonic relative to the fourth harmonic is about 30\ --\ 40 (10) ms. Based on the electron cyclotron maser emission mechanism, we analyze possible causes of the temporal delay and further infer relevant coronal parameters, such as the magnetic field strength and the electron density at the radio source.
  • The generalized Langevin equation describes anomalous dynamics. Noise is not only the origin of uncertainty but also plays a positive role in helping to detect signal with information, termed stochastic resonance (SR). This paper analyzes the anomalous resonant behaviors of the generalized Langevin system with a multiplicative dichotomous noise and an internal tempered Mittag-Leffler noise. For the system with fluctuating harmonic potential, we obtain the exact expressions of several SR, such as, the first moment, the amplitude and the autocorrelation function for the output signal as well as the signal-noise ratio. We analyze the influence of the tempering parameter and memory exponent on the bona fide SR and the general SR. Moreover, it is detected that the critical memory exponent changes regularly with the increase of tempering parameter. Almost all the theoretical results are validated by numerical simulations.
  • A complete understanding of the onset and subsequent evolution of confined flares has not been achieved. Earlier studies mainly analyzed disk events so as to reveal their magnetic topology and cause of confinement. In this study, taking advantage of a tandem of instruments working at different wavelengths of X-rays, EUVs, and microwaves, we present dynamic details of a confined flare observed on the northwestern limb of the solar disk on July 24th, 2016. The entire dynamic evolutionary process starting from its onset is consistent with a loop-loop interaction scenario. The X-ray profiles manifest an intriguing double-peak feature. From spectral fitting, it is found that the first peak is non-thermally dominated while the second peak is mostly multi-thermal with a hot (~10 MK) and a super-hot (~30 MK) component. This double-peak feature is unique in that the two peaks are clearly separated by 4 minutes, and the second peak reaches up to 25-50 keV; in addition, at energy bands above 3 keV the X-ray fluxes decline significantly between the two peaks. This, together with other available imaging and spectral data, manifest a two-stage energy release process. A comprehensive analysis is carried out to investigate the nature of this two-stage process. We conclude that the second stage with the hot and super-hot sources mainly involves direct heating through loop-loop reconnection at a relatively high altitude in the corona. The uniqueness of the event characteristics and complete data set make the study a nice addition to present literature on solar flares.
  • We report on high-resolution imaging and spectral observations of eruptions of a spiral structure in the transition region, which were taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS), the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The eruption coincided with the appearance of two series of jets, with velocities comparable to the Alfv\'en speeds in their footpoints. Several pieces of evidence of magnetic braiding in the eruption are revealed, including localized bright knots, multiple well-separated jet threads, transition region explosive events and the fact that all these three are falling into the same locations within the eruptive structures. Through analysis of the extrapolated three-dimensional magnetic field in the region, we found that the eruptive spiral structure corresponded well to locations of twisted magnetic flux tubes with varying curl values along their lengths. The eruption occurred where strong parallel currents, high squashing factors, and large twist numbers were obtained. The electron number density of the eruptive structure is found to be $\sim3\times10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$, indicating that significant amount of mass could be pumped into the corona by the jets. Following the eruption, the extrapolations revealed a set of seemingly relaxed loops, which were visible in the AIA 94 \AA\ channel indicating temperatures of around 6.3 MK. With these observations, we suggest that magnetic braiding could be part of the mechanisms explaining the formation of solar eruption and the mass and energy supplement to the corona.
  • The frequency responses of the K-Rb-$^{21}$Ne co-magnetometer to magnetic field and exotic spin dependent forces are experimentally studied and simulated in this paper. Both the relationship between the output amplitude, the phase shift and frequencies are studied. The responses of magnetic field are experimentally investigated. Due to a lack of input methods, others are numerically simulated.
  • The observation and research of the solar radio emission have unique scientific values in solar and space physics and related space weather forecasting applications, since the observed spectral structures may carry important information about energetic electrons and underlying physical mechanisms. In this study, we present the design of a novel dynamic spectrograph that is installed at the Chashan solar radio station operated by Laboratory for Radio Technologies, Institute of Space Sciences at Shandong University. The spectrograph is characterized by the real-time storage of digitized radio intensity data in the time domain and its capability to perform off-line spectral analysis of the radio spectra. The analog signals received via antennas and amplified with a low-noise amplifier are converted into digital data at a speed reaching up to 32 k data points per millisecond. The digital data are then saved into a high-speed electronic disk for further off-line spectral analysis. Using different word length (1 k - 32 k) and time cadence (5 ms - 10 s) for the off-line fast Fourier transform analysis, we can obtain the dynamic spectrum of a radio burst with different (user-defined) temporal (5 ms - 10 s) and spectral (3 kHz ~ 320 kHz) resolution. This brings a great flexibility and convenience to data analysis of solar radio bursts, especially when some specific fine spectral structures are under study.
  • We investigate energetic particle transport in Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) through a case study. The CIR event we study occurred on $2008$ February $08$ and was observed by both the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO)-B spacecraft. An in-situ reverse shock was observed by STEREO-B ($1.0$ AU) but not ACE ($0.98$ AU). Using STEREO-B observations and assuming the CIR structure does not vary significantly in the corotating frame, we estimate the shock location at later times for both the STEREO-B and ACE observations. Further assuming the accelerated particle spectral shape at the shock does not vary with shock location, we calculate the particle differential intensities as observed by ACE and STEREO-B at two different times by solving the focused transport equation using a Monte-Carlo simulation. We assume that particles move along Parker's field and experience no cross-field diffusion. We find that the modulation of sub-MeV/nucleon particles is significant. To obtain reasonable comparisons between the simulations and the observations by both ACE and STEREO-B, one has to assume that the CIR shock can accelerate more particles at a larger heliocentric distance than at a smaller heliocentric distance.
  • Double coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources are believed to be critical observational evidence of bi-directional energy release through magnetic reconnection in a large-scale current sheet in solar ares. Here we present a study on double coronal sources observed in both HXR and microwave regimes, revealing new characteristics distinct from earlier reports. This event is associated with a footpoint-occulted X1.3-class flare (25 April 2014, starting at 00:17 UT) and a coronal mass ejection that are likely triggered by the magnetic breakout process, with the lower source extending upward from the top of the partially-occulted flare loops and the upper source co-incident with rapidly squeezing-in side lobes (at a speed of ~250 km/s on both sides). The upper source can be identified at energies as high as 70-100 keV. The X-ray upper source is characterized by flux curves different from the lower source, a weak energy dependence of projected centroid altitude above 20 keV, a shorter duration and a HXR photon spectrum slightly-harder than those of the lower source. In addition, the microwave emission at 34 GHz also exhibits a similar double source structure and the microwave spectra at both sources are in line with gyro-synchrotron emission given by non- thermal energetic electrons. These observations, especially the co-incidence of the very-fast squeezing-in motion of side lobes and the upper source, indicate that the upper source is associated with (possibly caused by) this fast motion of arcades. This sheds new lights on the origin of the corona double-source structure observed in both HXRs and microwaves.
  • Type-I bursts (i.e. noise storms) are the earliest-known type of solar radio emission at the metre wavelength. They are believed to be excited by non-thermal energetic electrons accelerated in the corona. The underlying dynamic process and exact emission mechanism still remain unresolved. Here, with a combined analysis of extreme ultraviolet (EUV), radio and photospheric magnetic field data of unprecedented quality recorded during a type-I storm on 30 July 2011, we identify a good correlation between the radio bursts and the co-spatial EUV and magnetic activities. The EUV activities manifest themselves as three major brightening stripes above a region adjacent to a compact sunspot, while the magnetic field there presents multiple moving magnetic features (MMFs) with persistent coalescence or cancelation and a morphologically similar three-part distribution. We find that the type-I intensities are correlated with those of the EUV emissions at various wavelengths with a correlation coefficient of 0.7-0.8. In addition, in the region between the brightening EUV stripes and the radio sources there appear consistent dynamic motions with a series of bi-directional flows, suggesting ongoing small-scale reconnection there. Mainly based on the induced connection between the magnetic motion at the photosphere and the EUV and radio activities in the corona, we suggest that the observed type-I noise storms and the EUV brightening activities are the consequence of small-scale magnetic reconnection driven by MMFs. This is in support of the original proposal made by Bentely et al. (Solar Phys. 193, 227, 2000).
  • This paper further discusses the tempered fractional Brownian motion, its ergodicity, and the derivation of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation. Then we introduce the generalized Langevin equation with the tempered fractional Gaussian noise for a free particle, called tempered fractional Langevin equation (tfLe). While the tempered fractional Brownian motion displays localization diffusion for the long time limit and for the short time its mean squared displacement has the asymptotic form $t^{2H}$, we show that the asymptotic form of the mean squared displacement of the tfLe transits from $t^2$ (ballistic diffusion for short time) to $t^{2-2H}$, and then to $t^2$ (again ballistic diffusion for long time). On the other hand, the overdamped tfLe has the transition of the diffusion type from $t^{2-2H}$ to $t^2$ (ballistic diffusion). The tfLe with harmonic potential is also considered.
  • The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are well known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancellations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly-formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly-formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.
  • Solar filaments/prominences are one of the most common features in the corona, which may lead to energetic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares when they erupt. Filaments are about one hundred times cooler and denser than the coronal material, and physical understanding of their material origin remains controversial. Two types of scenarios have been proposed: one argues that the filament plasma is brought into the corona from photosphere or chromosphere through a siphon or evaporation/injection process, while the other suggests that the material condenses from the surrounding coronal plasma due to thermal instability. The elemental abundance analysis is a reasonable clue to constrain the models, as the siphon or evaporation/injection model would predict that the filament material abundances are close to the photospheric or chromospheric ones, while the condensation model should have coronal abundances. In this letter, we analyze the elemental abundances of a magnetic cloud that contains the ejected filament material. The corresponding filament eruption occurred on 1998 April 29, accompanying an M6.8 class soft X-ray flare located at the heliographic coordinates S18E20 (NOAA 08210) and a fast halo CME with the linear velocity of 1374 km s$^{-1}$ near the Sun. We find that the abundance ratios of elements with low and high First Ionization Potential such as Fe/O, Mg/O, and Si/O are 0.150, 0.050, and 0.070, respectively, approaching their corresponding photospheric values 0.065, 0.081, and 0.066, which does not support the coronal origin of the filament plasma.
  • Using the high-quality observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the interaction of two filaments (F1 and F2) in a long filament channel associated with twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2016 January 26. Before the eruption, a sequence of rapid cancellation and emergence of the magnetic flux has been observed, which likely triggered the ascending of the west filament (F1). The east footpoints of rising F1 moved toward the east far end of the filament channel, accompanying with post-eruption loops and flare ribbons. It likely indicated a large-scale eruption involving the long filament channel, resulted from the interaction between F1 and the east filament (F2). Some bright plasma flew over F2, and F2 stayed at rest during the eruption, likely due to the confinement of its overlying lower magnetic field. Interestingly, the impulsive F1 pushed its overlying magnetic arcades to form the first CME, and F1 finally evolved into the second CME after the collision with the nearby coronal hole. We suggest that the interaction of F1 and the overlying magnetic field of F2 led to the merging reconnection that form a longer eruptive filament loop. Our results also provide a possible picture of the origin of twin CMEs, and show the large-scale magnetic topology of the coronal hole is important for the eventual propagation direction of CMEs.
  • Hot channel (HC) structure, observed in the high-temperature passbands of the AIA/SDO, is regarded as one candidate of coronal flux rope which is an essential element of solar eruptions. Here we present the first radio imaging study of an HC structure in the metric wavelength. The associated radio emission manifests as a moving type-IV (t-IVm) burst. We show that the radio sources co-move outwards with the HC, indicating that the t-IV emitting energetic electrons are efficiently trapped within the structure. The t-IV sources at different frequencies present no considerable spatial dispersion during the early stage of the event, while the sources spread gradually along the eruptive HC structure at later stage with significant spatial dispersion. The t-IV bursts are characterized by a relatively-high brightness temperature ($\sim$ 10$^{7}$ $-$ 10$^{9}$ K), a moderate polarization, and a spectral shape that evolves considerably with time. This study demonstrates the possibility of imaging the eruptive HC structure at the metric wavelength and provides strong constraints on the t-IV emision mechanism, which, if understood, can be used to diagnose the essential parameters of the eruptive structure.
  • The physical connection among and formation mechanisms of various components of the prominence-horn cavity system remain elusive. Here we present observations of such a system, focusing on a section of the prominence that rises and separates gradually from the main body. This forms a configuration sufficiently simple to yield clues to the above issues. It is characterized by embedding horns, oscillations, and a gradual disappearance of the separated material. The prominence-horn structure exhibits a large amplitude longitudinal oscillation with a period of ~150 minutes and an amplitude of ~30 Mm along the trajectory defined by the concave horn structure. The horns also experience a simultaneous transverse oscillation with a much smaller amplitude (~3 Mm) and shorter period (~10-15 minutes), likely representative of a global mode of the large-scale magnetic structure. The gradual disappearance of the structure indicates that the horn, an observational manifestation of the field-aligned transition region separating the cool and dense prominence from the hot and tenuous corona, is formed due to the heating and diluting process of the central prominence mass, while most previous studies suggest that it is the opposite process, i.e., the cooling and condensation of coronal plasmas, to form the horn. This study also demonstrates how the prominence transports magnetic flux to the upper corona, a process essential for the gradual build-up of pre-eruption magnetic energy.
  • Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature ($>$10$^9$ K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually, may due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite sense of polarization. We also find that the sense of polarization of the radio burst is in contradiction to the O-mode and there exists a fairly large time delay ($\sim$3-5 s) between the fundamental and harmonic components. Possible explanations accounting for these observations are presented. Assuming the classical plasma emission mechanism, we can infer coronal parameters such as electron density and magnetic field near the radio source and make diagnostics on the magnetic mirror process.
  • First-of-its-kind radio imaging of decameter solar stationary type IV radio burst has been presented in this paper. On 6 September 2014 the observations of type IV burst radio emission have been carried out with the two-dimensional heliograph based on the Ukrainian T-shaped radio telescope (UTR-2) together with other telescope arrays. Starting at 09:55 UT and throughout 3 hours, the radio emission was kept within the observational session of UTR-2. The interesting observation covered the full evolution of this burst, "from birth to death". During the event lifetime, two C-class solar X-ray flares with peak times 11:29 UT and 12:24 UT took place. The time profile of this burst in radio has a double-humped shape that can be explained by injection of energetic electrons, accelerated by the two flares, into the burst source. According to the heliographic observations we suggest the burst source was confined within a high coronal loop, which was a part of a relatively slow coronal mass ejection. The latter has been developed for several hours before the onset of the event. Through analyzing about 1.5 million of heliograms (3700 temporal frames with 4096 images in each frame that correspond to the number of frequency channels) the radio burst source imaging shows a fascinating dynamical evolution. Both space-based (GOES, SDO, SOHO, STEREO) data and various ground-based instrumentation (ORFEES, NDA, RSTO, NRH) records have been used for this study.
  • Identification of regions of interest (ROI) associated with certain disease has a great impact on public health. Imposing sparsity of pixel values and extracting active regions simultaneously greatly complicate the image analysis. We address these challenges by introducing a novel region-selection penalty in the framework of image-on-scalar regression. Our penalty combines the Smoothly Clipped Absolute Deviation (SCAD) regularization, enforcing sparsity, and the SCAD of total variation (TV) regularization, enforcing spatial contiguity, into one group, which segments contiguous spatial regions against zero-valued background. Efficient algorithm is based on the alternative direction method of multipliers (ADMM) which decomposes the non-convex problem into two iterative optimization problems with explicit solutions. Another virtue of the proposed method is that a divide and conquer learning algorithm is developed, thereby allowing scaling to large images. Several examples are presented and the experimental results are compared with other state-of-the-art approaches.
  • In a hybrid pumping alkali vapor cell that both K and Rb are filled, K atom spins are optically pumped by laser and Rb atom spins are polarized by the K spins through spin exchange. We find that the AC Stark shift of the Rb atoms is composed of not only the AC Stark shift of the Rb atoms caused by the far off resonant pumping laser which is tuned to the K absorption lines, but also the AC Stark shift of the K atom spins. The mixing of the light shifts through fast spin exchange between K and Rb atoms are studied in this paper and we demonstrate a K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer in which the AC Stark shift of the Rb atoms are reduced by the collision mixing.
  • With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and there appeared three FRs. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edge, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in 3D standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that complex structures of the flare is likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least two magnetic reconnections.
  • Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterpart of coronal magnetic flux ropes. They can provide valuable information to reveal the flux rope characteristics at their eruption stage in the corona, which are unable to be explored in situ at present. In this paper, we make a comprehensive survey of the average iron charge state (<Q>Fe) distributions inside 96 MCs for solar cycle 23 using ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) data. As the <Q>Fe in the solar wind are typically around 9+ to 11+, the Fe charge state is defined as high when the <Q>Fe is larger than 12+, which implies the existence of a considerable amount of Fe ions with high charge states (e.g., \geq 16+). The statistical results show that the <Q>Fe distributions of 92 (~ 96%) MCs can be classified into four groups with different characteristics. In group A (11 MCs), the <Q>Fe shows a bimodal distribution with both peaks higher than 12+. Group B (4 MCs) presents a unimodal distribution of <Q>Fe with its peak higher than 12+. In groups C (29 MCs) and D (48 MCs), the <Q>Fe remains higher and lower than 12+ throughout ACE passage through the MC, respectively. Possible explanations to these distributions are discussed.
  • Using two-dimensional simulations, we numerically explore the dependences of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability upon various physical parameters, including viscosity, width of sheared layer, flow speed, and magnetic field strength. In most cases, a multi-vortex phase exists between the initial growth phase and final single-vortex phase. The parametric study shows that the evolutionary properties, such as phase duration and vortex dynamics, are generally sensitive to these parameters except in certain regimes. An interesting result is that for supersonic flows, the phase durations and saturation of velocity growth approach constant values asymptotically as the sonic Mach number increases. We confirm that the linear coupling between magnetic field and Kelvin-Helmholtz modes is negligible if the magnetic field is weak enough. The morphological behaviour suggests that the multi-vortex coalescence might be driven by the underlying wave-wave interaction. Based on these results, we make a preliminary discussion about several events observed in the solar corona. The numerical models need to be further improved to make a practical diagnostic of the coronal plasma properties.