• Today's galaxies experienced cosmic reionization at different times in different locations. For the first time, reionization ($50\%$ ionized) redshifts, $z_R$, at the location of their progenitors are derived from new, fully-coupled radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of galaxy formation and reionization at $z > 6$, matched to N-body simulation to z = 0. Constrained initial conditions were chosen to form the well-known structures of the local universe, including the Local Group and Virgo, in a (91 Mpc)$^3$ volume large enough to model both global and local reionization. Reionization simulation CoDa I-AMR, by CPU-GPU code EMMA, used (2048)$^3$ particles and (2048)$^3$ initial cells, adaptively-refined, while N-body simulation CoDa I-DM2048, by Gadget2, used (2048)$^3$ particles, to find reionization times for all galaxies at z = 0 with masses $M(z=0)\ge 10^8 M_\odot$. Galaxies with $M(z=0) \gtrsim 10^{11} M_\odot$ reionized earlier than the universe as a whole, by up to $\sim$ 500 Myrs, with significant scatter. For Milky-Way-like galaxies, $z_R$ ranged from 8 to 15. Galaxies with $M(z=0) \lesssim 10^{11} M_\odot$ typically reionized as late or later than globally-averaged $50\%$ reionization at $\langle z_R\rangle =7.8$, in neighborhoods where reionization was completed by external radiation. The spread of reionization times within galaxies was sometimes as large as the galaxy-to-galaxy scatter. The Milky Way and M31 reionized earlier than global reionization but later than typical for their mass, neither dominated by external radiation. Their most massive progenitors at $z>6$ had $z_R$ = 9.8 (MW) and 11 (M31), while their total masses had $z_R$ = 8.2 (both).
  • We revisit the estimation of the combined mass of the Milky Way and Andromeda (M31), which dominate the mass of the Local Group. We make use of an ensemble of 30,190 halo pairs from the Small MultiDark simulation, assuming a $\Lambda$CDM (Cosmological Constant with Cold Dark Matter) cosmology, to investigate the relationship between the bound mass and parameters characterising the orbit of the binary and their local environment with the aid of machine learning methods (artificial neural networks, ANN). Results from the ANN are most successful when information about the velocity shear is provided, which demonstrates the flexibility of machine learning to model physical phenomena and readily incorporate new information as it becomes available. The resulting estimate for the Local Group mass, when shear information is included, is $4.9 \times 10^{12} M_\odot$, with an error of $\pm0.8 \times 10^{12} M_\odot$ from the 68% uncertainty in observables, and a 68% confidence interval of $^{+1.3}_{-1.4} \times 10^{12}M_\odot$ from the intrinsic scatter from the differences between the model and simulation masses. We also consider a recently reported large transverse velocity of M31 relative to the Milky Way, and produce an alternative mass estimate of $3.6\pm0.3\pm1.4 \times 10^{12}M_\odot$. Although different methods predict similar values for the most likely mass of the LG, application of ANN compared to the Timing Argument reduces the scatter in the log mass by over half when tested on samples from the simulation.
  • The influence of the large scale structure on host halos may be studied by examining the angular infall pattern of subhalos. In particular, since warm and cold dark matter cosmologies predict different abundances and internal properties for halos at the low mass end of the mass function, it is interesting to examine if there are differences in how these low mass halos are accreted. The accretion events are defined as the moment a halo becomes a substructure, namely when it crosses its host's virial radius. We quantify the cosmic web at each point by the shear tensor and examine where, with respect to its eigenvectors, such accretion events occur in cold ($\Lambda$CDM) and warm (1keV sterile neutrino WDM) dark matter cosmological models. We find that the CDM and WDM subhalos are preferentially accreted along the principal axis of the shear tensor corresponding to the direction of weakest collapse. The beaming strength is modulated by the host and subhalo masses and by the redshift at which the accretion event occurs. Although strongest for the most massive hosts and subhalos at high redshift, the preferential infall is found to be always aligned with the axis of weakest collapse, thus we say that it has universal nature. We compare the strength of beaming in the WDM cosmology with the one found in the $\Lambda$CDM scenario. While the main findings remain the same, the accretion in the WDM model for the most massive host halos appears more beamed than in $\Lambda$CDM cosmology across all the redshifts.
  • The three-dimensional gravitational velocity field within z~0.1 has been modeled with the Wiener filter methodology applied to the Cosmicflows-3 compilation of galaxy distances. The dominant features are a basin of attraction and two basins of repulsion. The major basin of attraction is an extension of the Shapley concentration of galaxies. One basin of repulsion, the Dipole Repeller, is located near the anti-apex of the cosmic microwave background dipole. The other basin of repulsion is in the proximate direction toward the 'Cold Spot' irregularity in the cosmic microwave background. It has been speculated that a vast void might contribute to the amplitude of the Cold Spot from the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect.
  • The network of filaments with embedded clusters surrounding voids seen in maps derived from redshift surveys and reproduced in simulations has been referred to as the cosmic web. A complementary description is provided by considering the shear in the velocity field of galaxies. The eigenvalues of the shear provide information on whether a region is collapsing in three dimensions, the condition for a knot, expanding in three-dimensions, the condition for a void, or in the intermediate condition of a filament or sheet. The structures that are quantitatively defined by the eigenvalues can be approximated by iso-contours that provide a visual representation of the cosmic velocity (V) web. The current application is based on radial peculiar velocities from the Cosmicflows-2 collection of distances. The three-dimensional velocity field is constructed using the Wiener filter methodology in the linear approximation. Eigenvalues of the velocity shear are calculated at each point on a grid. Here, knots and filaments are visualized across a local domain of diameter ~0.1c.
  • The cosmic web is one of the most striking features of the distribution of galaxies and dark matter on the largest scales in the Universe. It is composed of dense regions packed full of galaxies, long filamentary bridges, flattened sheets and vast low density voids. The study of the cosmic web has focused primarily on the identification of such features, and on understanding the environmental effects on galaxy formation and halo assembly. As such, a variety of different methods have been devised to classify the cosmic web -- depending on the data at hand, be it numerical simulations, large sky surveys or other. In this paper we bring twelve of these methods together and apply them to the same data set in order to understand how they compare. In general these cosmic web classifiers have been designed with different cosmological goals in mind, and to study different questions. Therefore one would not {\it a priori} expect agreement between different techniques however, many of these methods do converge on the identification of specific features. In this paper we study the agreements and disparities of the different methods. For example, each method finds that knots inhabit higher density regions than filaments, etc. and that voids have the lowest densities. For a given web environment, we find substantial overlap in the density range assigned by each web classification scheme. We also compare classifications on a halo-by-halo basis; for example, we find that 9 of 12 methods classify around a third of group-mass haloes (i.e. $M_{\rm halo}\sim10^{13.5}h^{-1}M_{\odot}$) as being in filaments. Lastly, so that any future cosmic web classification scheme can be compared to the 12 methods used here, we have made all the data used in this paper public.
  • Observations of the Milky Way (MW), M31, and their vicinity, known as the Local Group (LG), can provide clues about the sources of reionization. We present a suite of radiative transfer simulations based on initial conditions provided by the Constrained Local UniversE Simulations (CLUES) project that are designed to recreate the Local Universe, including a realistic MW-M31 pair and a nearby Virgo. Our box size (91 Mpc) is large enough to incorporate the relevant sources of ionizing photons for the LG. We employ a range of source models, mimicking the potential effects of radiative feedback for dark matter haloes between $10^{8}-10^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$. Although the LG mostly reionizes in an inside-out fashion, the final 40 per cent of its ionization shows some outside influence. For the LG satellites, we find no evidence that their redshift of reionization is related to the present-day mass of the satellite or the distance from the central galaxy. We find that less than 20 per cent of present-day satellites for MW and M31 have undergone any star formation prior to the end of global reionization. Approximately five per cent of these satellites could be classified as fossils, meaning the majority of star formation occurred at these early times. The more massive satellites have more cumulative star formation prior to the end of global reionization, but the scatter is significant, especially at the low-mass end. Present-day mass and distance from the central galaxy are poor predictors for the presence of ancient stellar populations in satellite galaxies.
  • The Wiener Filter (WF) technique enables the reconstruction of density and velocity fields from observed radial peculiar velocities. This paper aims at identifying the optimal design of peculiar velocity surveys within the WF framework. The prime goal is to test the dependence of the quality of the reconstruction on the distribution and nature of data points. Mock datasets, extending to 250 Mpc/h, are drawn from a constrained simulation that mimics the local Universe to produce realistic mock catalogs. Reconstructed fields obtained with these mocks are compared to the reference simulation. Comparisons, including residual distributions, cell-to-cell and bulk velocities, imply that the presence of field data points is essential to properly measure the flows. The fields reconstructed from mocks that consist only of galaxy cluster data points exhibit poor quality bulk velocities. In addition, the quality of the reconstruction depends strongly on the grouping of individual data points into single points to suppress virial motions in high density regions. Conversely, the presence of a Zone of Avoidance hardly affects the reconstruction. For a given number of data points, a uniform sample does not score any better than a sample with decreasing number of data points with the distance. The best reconstructions are obtained with a grouped survey containing field galaxies: Assuming no error, they differ from the simulated field by less than 100 km/s up to the extreme edge of the catalogs or up to a distance of three times the mean distance of data points for non-uniform catalogs. The overall conclusions hold when errors are added.
  • In the standard (LCDM) model of cosmology the universe has emerged out of an early homogeneous and isotropic phase. Structure formation is associated with the growth of density irregularities and peculiar velocities. Our Local Group is moving with respect to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with a velocity 631+/-20 km s-1 and participates in a bulk flow that extends out to distances of at least 20,000 km s-1. Since the discovery of the CMB dipole, the implicit assumption was that excesses in the abundance of galaxies induce the Local Group motion. Yet, underdense regions push as much as overdensities attract but they are deficient of light and consequently difficult to chart. It was suggested a decade ago that an underdensity in the northern hemisphere roughly 15,000 km s-1 away is a significant actor in the local flow. Here we report on kinematic evidence for such an underdensity. We map the large scale 3D velocity field using a Wiener filter reconstruction from the Cosmicflows-2 dataset of peculiar velocities, and identify the attractors and repellers that dominate the local dynamics. We show here that the local flow is dominated by a single attractor -associated with the Shapley Concentration- and a single previously unidentified repeller. Multipole expansion of the local flow provides further support for the existence and role played by the attractor and repeller. The bulk flow (i.e. dipole moment) is closely (anti)aligned with the repeller at a distance of 16,000+/-4,500 km s-1. The expansion eigenvector of the shear tensor (quadrupole moment) is closely aligned with the Shapley Attractor out to 7,000 km s-1. The close alignment of the local bulk flow with the repeller provides further support for its dominant role in shaping the local flow. This Dipole Repeller is predicted to be associated with a void in the distribution of galaxies.
  • Cosmography, the study and making of maps of the universe or cosmos, is a field where visual representation benefits from modern three-dimensional visualization techniques and media. At the extragalactic distance scales, visualization is contributing in understanding the complex structure of the local universe, in terms of spatial distribution and flows of galaxies and dark matter. In this paper, we report advances in the field of extragalactic cosmography obtained using the SDvision visualization software in the context of the Cosmicflows Project. Here, multiple visualization techniques are applied to a variety of data products: catalogs of galaxy positions and galaxy peculiar velocities, reconstructed velocity field, density field, gravitational potential field, velocity shear tensor viewed in terms of its eigenvalues and eigenvectors, envelope surfaces enclosing basins of attraction. These visualizations, implemented as high-resolution images, videos, and interactive viewers, have contributed to a number of studies: the cosmography of the local part of the universe, the nature of the Great Attractor, the discovery of the boundaries of our home supercluster of galaxies Laniakea, the mapping of the cosmic web, the study of attractors and repellers.
  • The mass of the Local Group (LG) is a crucial parameter for galaxy formation theories. However, its observational determination is challenging - its mass budget is dominated by dark matter which cannot be directly observed. To meet this end the posterior distributions of the LG and its massive constituents have been constructed by means of constrained and random cosmological simulations. Two priors are assumed - the LCDM model that is used to set up the simulations and a LG model,which encodes the observational knowledge of the LG and is used to select LG-like objects from the simulations. The constrained simulations are designed to reproduce the local cosmography as it is imprinted onto the Cosmicflows-2 database of velocities. Several prescriptions are used to define the LG model, focusing in particular on different recent estimates of the tangential velocity of M31. It is found that (a) different $v_{tan}$ choices affect the peak mass values up to a factor of 2, and change mass ratios of $M_{M31}$ to $M_{MW}$ by up to 20%; (b) constrained simulations yield more sharply peaked posterior distributions compared with the random ones; (c) LG mass estimates are found to be smaller than those found using the timing argument; (d) preferred MW masses lie in the range of $(0.6 - 0.8)\times10^{12} M_{\odot}$ whereas (e) $M_{M31}$ is found to vary between $(1.0 - 2.0)\times10^{12} M_{\odot}$, with a strong dependence on the $v_{tan}$ values used.
  • Cosmic reionization by starlight from early galaxies affected their evolution, thereby impacting reionization, itself. Star formation suppression, for example, may explain the observed underabundance of Local Group dwarfs relative to N-body predictions for Cold Dark Matter. Reionization modelling requires simulating volumes large enough [~(100Mpc)^3] to sample reionization "patchiness", while resolving millions of galaxy sources above ~10^8 Msun , combining gravitational and gas dynamics with radiative transfer. Modelling the Local Group requires initial cosmological density fluctuations pre-selected to form the well-known structures of the local universe today. Cosmic Dawn ("CoDa") is the first such fully-coupled, radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of reionization of the local universe. Our new hybrid CPU-GPU code, RAMSES-CUDATON, performs hundreds of radiative transfer and ionization rate-solver timesteps on the GPUs for each hydro-gravity timestep on the CPUs. CoDa simulated (91Mpc)^3 with 4096^3 particles and cells, to redshift 4.23, on ORNL supercomputer Titan, utilizing 8192 cores and 8192 GPUs. Global reionization ended slightly later than observed. However, a simple temporal rescaling which brings the evolution of ionized fraction into agreement with observations also reconciles ionizing flux density, cosmic star formation history, CMB electron scattering optical depth and galaxy UV luminosity function with their observed values. Photoionization heating suppressed the star formation of haloes below ~2 x 10^9 Msun , decreasing the abun- dance of faint galaxies around MAB_1600 = [-10,-12]. For most of reionization, star formation was dominated by haloes between 10^10 - 10^11 Msun , so low-mass halo suppression was not reflected by a distinct feature in the global star formation history. (Abridged)
  • An open question in cosmology and the theory of structure formation is to what extent does environment affect the properties of galaxies and haloes. The present paper aims at shedding light on this problem. The paper focuses on the analysis of a dark matter only simulation and it addresses the issue of how the environment affects the abundance of haloes, which are are assigned four attributes: their virial mass, an ambient density calculated with an aperture that scales with $R_{vir}$ ($\Delta_M$), a fixed-aperture ($\Delta_R$) ambient density, and a cosmic web classification (i.e. voids, sheets, filaments, and knots, as defined by the V--web algorithm). $\Delta_M$ is the mean density around a halo evaluated within a sphere of a radius of $5$\rvir, where \rvir\ is the virial radius. $\Delta_R$ is the density field Gaussian smoothed with $R=4h^{-1}$Mpc, evaluated at the center of the halo. The main result of the paper is that the difference between haloes in different web elements stems from the difference in their mass functions, and does not depend on their adaptive-aperture ambient density. A dependence on the fixed-aperture ambient density is induced by the cross correlation between the mass of a halo and its fixed-aperture ambient density.
  • While the Virgo cluster is the nearest galaxy cluster and therefore the best observed one, little is known about its formation history. In this paper, a set of cosmological simulations that resemble the Local Universe is used to shed the first light on this mystery. The initial conditions for these simulations are constrained with galaxy peculiar velocities of the second catalog of the Cosmicflows project using algorithms developed within the Constrained Local UniversE Simulation project. Boxes of 500 Mpc/h on a side are set to run a series of dark matter only constrained simulations. In each simulation, a unique dark matter halo can be reliably identified as Virgo's counterpart. The properties of these Virgo halos are in agreement at a 10-20% level with the global properties of the observed Virgo cluster. Their zero-velocity masses agree at one-sigma with the observational mass estimate. In all the simulations, the matter falls onto the Virgo objects along a preferential direction that corresponds to the observational filament and the slowest direction of collapse. A study of the mass accretion history of the Virgo candidates reveals the most likely formation history of the Virgo cluster, namely a quiet accretion over the last 7 Gigayears.
  • The goodness-of-fit (GoF) of the Cosmicflows-2 (CF2) database of peculiar velocities with the LCDM standard model of cosmology is presented. Standard application of the Chi^2 statistics of the full database, of its 4,838 data points, is hampered by the small scale nonlinear dynamics which is not accounted for by the (linear regime) velocity power spectrum. The bulk velocity constitutes a highly compressed representation of the data which filters out the small scales non-linear modes. Hence the statistics of the bulk flow provides an efficient tool for assessing the GoF of the data given a model. The particular approach introduced here is to use the (spherical top-hat window) bulk velocity extracted from the Wiener filter reconstruction of the 3D velocity field as a linear low pass filtered highly compressed representation of the CF2 data. An ensemble 2250 random linear realizations of the WMAP/LCDM model has been used to calculate the bulk velocity auto-covariance matrix. We find that the CF2 data is consistent with the WMAP/LCDM model to better than the 2 sigma confidence limits. This provides a further validation that the CF2 database is consistent with the standard model of cosmology.
  • Determining the precise value of the tangential component of the velocity of M31 is a non trivial astrophysical issue, that relies on complicated modeling. This has recently lead to con- flicting estimates, obtained by several groups that used different methodologies and assump- tions. This letter addresses the issue by computing a Bayesian posterior distribution function of this quantity, in order to measure the compatibility of those estimates with LambdaCDM. This is achieved using an ensemble of local group (LG) look-alikes collected from a set of Con- strained Simulations (CSs) of the local Universe, and a standard unconstrained LambdaCDM. The latter allows us to build a control sample of LG-like pairs and to single out the influence of the environment in our results. We find that neither estimate is at odds with LambdaCDM; how- ever, whereas CSs favour higher values of vtan , the reverse is true for estimates based on LG samples gathered from unconstrained simulations, overlooking the environmental element
  • Near field cosmology is practiced by studying the Local Group (LG) and its neighbourhood. The present paper describes a framework for simulating the near field on the computer. Assuming the LCDM model as a prior and applying the Bayesian tools of the Wiener filter (WF) and constrained realizations of Gaussian fields to the Cosmicflows-2 (CF2) survey of peculiar velocities, constrained simulations of our cosmic environment are performed. The aim of these simulations is to reproduce the LG and its local environment. Our main result is that the LG is likely a robust outcome of the LCDM scenario when subjected to the constraint derived from CF2 data, emerging in an environment akin to the observed one. Three levels of criteria are used to define the simulated LGs. At the base level, pairs of halos must obey specific isolation, mass and separation criteria. At the second level the orbital angular momentum and energy are constrained and on the third one the phase of the orbit is constrained. Out of the 300 constrained simulations 146 LGs obey the first set of criteria, 51 the second and 6 the third. The robustness of our LG factory enables the construction of a large ensemble of simulated LGs. Suitable candidates for high resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the LG can be drawn from this ensemble, which can be used to perform comprehensive studies of the formation of the LG
  • Tidal torque theory suggests that galaxies gain angular momentum in the linear stage of structure formation. Such a theory predicts alignments between the spin of haloes and tidal shear field. However, non-linear evolution and angular momentum acquisition may alter this prediction significantly. In this paper, we use a reconstruction of the cosmic shear field from observed peculiar velocities combined with spin axes extracted from galaxies within $115\, \mathrm{Mpc} $ ($\sim8000 \, {\mathrm {km}}{\mathrm s}^{-1}$) from 2MRS catalog, to test whether or not galaxies appear aligned with principal axes of shear field. Although linear reconstructions of the tidal field have looked at similar issues, this is the first such study to examine galaxy alignments with velocity-shear field. Ellipticals in the 2MRS sample, show a statistically significant alignment with two of the principal axes of the shear field. In general, elliptical galaxies have their short axis aligned with the axis of greatest compression and perpendicular to the axis of slowest compression. Spiral galaxies show no signal. Such an alignment is significantly strengthened when considering only those galaxies that are used in velocity field reconstruction. When examining such a subsample, a weak alignment with the axis of greatest compression emerges for spiral galaxies as well. This result indicates that although velocity field reconstructions still rely on fairly noisy and sparse data, the underlying alignment with shear field is strong enough to be visible even when small numbers of galaxies are considered - especially if those galaxies are used as constraints in the reconstruction.
  • We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group to explore the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We find that a number of simulated dwarfs form "outside-in", with an old, metal-poor population that surrounds a younger, more concentrated metal-rich component, reminiscent of dwarf spheroidals like Sculptor or Sextans. We focus on a few examples where stars form in two populations distinct in age in order to elucidate the origin of these gradients. The spatial distributions of the two components reflect their diverse origin; the old stellar component is assembled through mergers, but the young population forms largely in situ. The older component results from a first episode of star formation that begins early but is quickly shut off by the combined effects of stellar feedback and reionization. The younger component forms when a late accretion event adds gas and reignites star formation. The effect of mergers is to disperse the old stellar population, increasing their radius and decreasing their central density relative to the young population. We argue that dwarf-dwarf mergers offer a plausible scenario for the formation of systems with multiple distinct populations and, more generally, for the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidals.
  • This paper combines observational datasets and cosmological simulations to generate realistic numerical replicas of the nearby Universe. These latter are excellent laboratories for studies of the non-linear process of structure formation in our neighborhood. With measurements of radial peculiar velocities in the Local Universe (cosmicflows-2) and a newly developed technique, we produce Constrained Local UniversE Simulations (CLUES). To assess the quality of these constrained simulations, we compare them with random simulations as well as with local observations. The cosmic variance, defined as the mean one-sigma scatter of cell-to-cell comparison between two fields, is significantly smaller for the constrained simulations than for the random simulations. Within the inner part of the box where most of the constraints are, the scatter is smaller by a factor 2 to 3 on a 5 Mpc/h scale with respect to that found for random simulations. This one-sigma scatter obtained when comparing the simulated and the observation-reconstructed velocity fields is only 104 +/- 4 km/s i.e. the linear theory threshold. These two results demonstrate that these simulations are in agreement with each other and with the observations of our neighborhood. For the first time, simulations constrained with observational radial peculiar velocities resemble the Local Universe up to a distance of 150 Mpc/h on a scale of a few tens of megaparsecs. When focusing on the inner part of the box, the resemblance with our cosmic neighborhood extends to a few megaparsecs (< 5 Mpc/h). The simulations provide a proper Large Scale environment for studies of the formation of nearby objects.
  • Superclusters of galaxies can be defined kinematically from local evaluations of the velocity shear tensor. The location where the smallest eigenvalue of the shear is positive and maximal defines the center of a basin of attraction. Velocity and density fields are reconstructed with Wiener Filter techniques. Local velocities due to the density field in a restricted region can be separated from external tidal flows, permitting the identification of boundaries separating inward flows toward a basin of attraction and outward flows. This methodology was used to define the Laniakea Supercluster that includes the Milky Way. Large adjacent structures include Perseus-Pisces, Coma, Hercules, and Shapley but current kinematic data are insufficient to capture their full domains. However there is a small region trapped between Laniakea, Perseus-Pisces, and Coma that is close enough to be reliably characterized and that satisfies the kinematic definition of a supercluster. Because of its shape, it is given the name the Arrowhead Supercluster. This entity does not contain any major clusters. A characteristic dimension is ~25 Mpc and the contained mass is only ~10^15 Msun.
  • Recent observational studies have demonstrated that the majority of satellite galaxies tend to orbit their hosts on highly flattened, vast, possibly co-rotating planes. Two nearly parallel planes of satellites have been confirmed around the M31 galaxy and around the Centaurus A galaxy, while the Milky Way also sports a plane of satellites. It has been argued that such an alignment of satellites on vast planes is unexpected in the standard ({\Lambda}CDM) model of cosmology if not even in contradiction to its generic predictions. Guided by {\Lambda}CDM numerical simulations, which suggest that satellites are channeled towards hosts along the axis of the slowest collapse as dictated by the ambient velocity shear tensor, we re-examine the planes of local satellites systems within the framework of the local shear tensor derived from the Cosmicflows-2 dataset. The analysis reveals that the Local Group and Centaurus A reside in a filament stretched by the Virgo cluster and compressed by the expansion of the Local Void. Four out of five thin planes of satellite galaxies are indeed closely aligned with the axis of compression induced by the Local Void. Being the less massive system, the moderate misalignment of the Milky Way's satellite plane can likely be ascribed to its greater susceptibility to tidal torques, as suggested by numerical simulations. The alignment of satellite systems in the local universe with the ambient shear field is thus in general agreement with predictions of the {\Lambda}CDM model.
  • The cosmic web that characterizes the large-scale structure of the Universe can be quantified by a variety of methods. For example, large redshift surveys can be used in combination with point process algorithms to extract long curvilinear filaments in the galaxy distribution. Alternatively, given a full 3D reconstruction of the velocity field, kinematic techniques can be used to decompose the web into voids, sheets, filaments and knots. In this paper we look at how two such algorithms - the Bisous model and the velocity shear web - compare with each other in the local Universe (within 100 Mpc), finding good agreement. This is both remarkable and comforting, given that the two methods are radically different in ideology and applied to completely independent and different data sets. Unsurprisingly, the methods are in better agreement when applied to unbiased and complete data sets, like cosmological simulations, than when applied to observational samples. We conclude that more observational data is needed to improve on these methods, but that both methods are most likely properly tracing the underlying distribution of matter in the Universe.
  • Full sky surveys of peculiar velocity are arguably the best way to map the large scale structure out to distances of a few times 100 Mpc/h. Using the largest and most accurate ever catalog of galaxy peculiar velocities "Cosmicflows-2", the large scale structure has been reconstructed by means of the Wiener filter and constrained realizations assuming as a Bayesian prior model the LCDM model with the WMAP inferred cosmological parameters. The present paper focuses on studying the bulk flow of the local flow field, defined as the mean velocity of top-hat spheres with radii ranging out to R=500 Mpc/h. The estimated large scale structures, in general, and the bulk flow, in particular, are determined by the tension between the observational data and the assumed prior model. A prerequisite for such an analysis is the requirement that the estimated bulk flow is consistent with the prior model. Such a consistency is found here. At R=50(150) Mpc/h the estimated bulk velocity is 250+/-21 (239+/-38) km/s. The corresponding cosmic variance at these radii is 126(60)km/s, which implies that these estimated bulk flows are dominated by the data and not by the assumed prior model. The estimated bulk velocity is dominated by the data out to R~200 Mpc/h, where the cosmic variance on the individual Supergalactic Cartesian components (of the r.m.s. values) exceeds the variance of the Constrained Realizations by at least a factor of 2. The supergalactic SGX and SGY components of the CMB dipole velocity are recovered by the Wiener filter velocity field down to a very few km/s. The SGZ component of the estimated velocity, the one that is most affected by the Zone of Avoidance, is off by 126 km/s (an almost 2 sigma discrepancy).
  • We seek to understand the relationship between galaxy properties and their local environment, which calls for a proper formulation of the notion of environment. We analyse the GIMIC suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations within the framework of the cosmic web as formulated by Hoffman et al., focusing on properties of simulated DM haloes and luminous galaxies with respect to voids, sheets, filaments and knots - the four elements of the cosmic web. We find that the mass functions of haloes depend on environment, which drives other environmental dependence of galaxy formation. The web shapes the halo mass function, and through the strong dependence of the galaxy properties on the mass of their host haloes, it also shapes the galaxy-(web) environment dependence.