• The plasmoid instability in evolving current sheets has been widely studied due to its effects on the disruption of current sheets, the formation of plasmoids, and the resultant fast magnetic reconnection. In this Letter, we study the role of the plasmoid instabality in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence by means of high-resolution direct numerical simulations. At sufficiently large magnetic Reynolds number ($R_m=10^6$), the combined effects of dynamic alignment and turbulent intermittency lead to a copious formation of plasmoids in a multitude of intense current sheets. The disruption of current sheet structures facilitates the energy cascade towards small scales, leading to the breaking and steepening of the energy spectrum. In the plasmoid-mediated regime, the energy spectrum displays a scaling that is close to the spectral index $-2.2$ as proposed by recent analytic theories. We also demonstrate that the dynamic alignment exists in 2D MHD turbulence and the corresponding slope of the alignment angle is close to 0.25.
  • The energy spectrum of tearing mode turbulence in a sheared background magnetic field is studied in this work. We consider the scenario where the nonlinear interaction of overlapping large-scale modes stirs up a broad spectrum of small-scale modes, generating tearing mode turbulence. The spectrum of such turbulence is of interest since it is relevant to the small-scale back-reaction to the large-scale field. The turbulence we discuss here differs from traditional MHD turbulence mainly in two aspects, one being the existence of many linearly stable small-scale modes which cause an effective damping during energy cascade; the other being the scale independent anisotropy induced by the large scale modes tilting the sheared background field, as opposed to the scale dependent anisotropy frequently encountered in traditional weak turbulence or critically balanced turbulence theory. These two differences result in the deviation of energy spectrum from a simple power law behavior, taking the form of a power law multiplied by an exponential falloff. Numerical simulation is carried out using viscous resistive MHD equations to verify our theoretical prediction, and reasonable agreement is found between numerical result and our model.
  • We revisit Parker's conjecture of current singularity formation in 3D line-tied plasmas using a recently developed numerical method, variational integration for ideal magnetohydrodynamics in Lagrangian labeling. With the frozen-in equation built-in, the method is free of artificial reconnection, and hence it is arguably an optimal tool for studying current singularity formation. Using this method, the formation of current singularity has previously been confirmed in the Hahm--Kulsrud--Taylor problem in 2D. In this paper, we extend this problem to 3D line-tied geometry. The linear solution, which is singular in 2D, is found to be smooth for arbitrary system length. However, with finite amplitude, the linear solution can become pathological when the system is sufficiently long. The nonlinear solutions turn out to be smooth for short systems. Nonetheless, the scaling of peak current density versus system length suggests that the nonlinear solution may become singular at finite length. With the results in hand, we can neither confirm nor rule out this possibility conclusively, since we cannot obtain solutions with system length near the extrapolated critical value.
  • The scaling of plasmoid instability maximum linear growth rate with respect to Lundquist number $S$ in a Sweet-Parker current sheet, $\gamma_{max}\sim S^{1/4}$, indicates that at high $S$, the current sheet will break apart before it approaches the Sweet-Parker width. Therefore, a proper description for the onset of the plasmoid instability must incorporate the evolving process of the current sheet. We carry out a series of two-dimensional simulations and develop diagnostics to separate fluctuations from an evolving background. It is found that the fluctuation amplitude starts to grow only when the linear growth rate is sufficiently large ($\gamma_{max}\tau_{A}>O(1)$) to overcome convective losses. The linear growth rate continues to rise until the sizes of plasmoids become comparable to the inner layer width of the tearing mode. At this point the current sheet is disrupted and the instability enters the early nonlinear regime. The growth rate suddenly decreases, but the fluctuation amplitude continues to grow until it reaches nonlinear saturation. We identify important time scales of the instability development, as well as scalings for the linear growth rate, current sheet width, and dominant wavenumber at current sheet disruption. These scalings depend on not only the Lundquist number, but also the initial noise amplitude. A phenomenological model that reproduces scalings from simulation results is proposed. The model incorporates the effect of reconnection outflow, which is crucial for yielding a critical Lundquist number $S_{c}$ below which disruption does not occur. The critical Lundquist number $S_{c}$ is not a constant value but has a weak dependence on the noise amplitude.
  • The plasmoid instability has revolutionized our understanding of magnetic reconnection in astrophysical environments. By preventing the formation of highly elongated reconnection layers, it is crucial in enabling the rapid energy conversion rates that are characteristic of many astrophysical phenomena. Most of the previous studies have focused on Sweet-Parker current sheets, which, however, are unattainable in typical astrophysical systems. Here, we derive a general set of scaling laws for the plasmoid instability in resistive and visco-resistive current sheets that evolve over time. Our method relies on a principle of least time that enables us to determine the properties of the reconnecting current sheet (aspect ratio and elapsed time) and the plasmoid instability (growth rate, wavenumber, inner layer width) at the end of the linear phase. After this phase the reconnecting current sheet is disrupted and fast reconnection can occur. The scaling laws of the plasmoid instability are \emph{not} simple power laws, and depend on the Lundquist number ($S$), the magnetic Prandtl number ($P_m$), the noise of the system ($\psi_0$), the characteristic rate of current sheet evolution ($1/\tau$), as well as the thinning process. We also demonstrate that previous scalings are inapplicable to the vast majority of the astrophysical systems. We explore the implications of the new scaling relations in astrophysical systems such as the solar corona and the interstellar medium. In both these systems, we show that our scaling laws yield values for the growth rate, wavenumber, and aspect ratio that are much smaller than the Sweet-Parker based scalings.
  • Recently a variational integrator for ideal magnetohydrodynamics in Lagrangian labeling has been developed. Its built-in frozen-in equation makes it optimal for studying current sheet formation. We use this scheme to study the Hahm-Kulsrud-Taylor problem, which considers the response of a 2D plasma magnetized by a sheared field under sinusoidal boundary forcing. We obtain an equilibrium solution that preserves the magnetic topology of the initial field exactly, with a fluid mapping that is non-differentiable. Unlike previous studies that examine the current density output, we identify a singular current sheet from the fluid mapping. These results are benchmarked with a constrained Grad-Shafranov solver. The same signature of current singularity can be found in other cases with more complex magnetic topologies.
  • It has been established that the Sweet-Parker current layer in high Lundquist number reconnection is unstable to the super-Alfv\'enic plasmoid instability. Past two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that the plasmoid instability leads to a new regime where the Sweet-Parker current layer changes into a chain of plasmoids connected by secondary current sheets, and the averaged reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number. In this work, three-dimensional simulation with a guide field shows that the additional degree of freedom allows plasmoid instabilities to grow at oblique angles, which interact and lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection. The averaged reconnection rate in the self-generated turbulent state is of the order of a hundredth of the characteristic Alfv\'en speed, which is similar to the two-dimensional result but is an order of magnitude lower than the fastest reconnection rate reported in recent studies of externally driven three-dimensional turbulent reconnection. Kinematic and magnetic energy fluctuations both form elongated eddies along the direction of local magnetic field, which is a signature of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Both energy fluctuations satisfy power-law spectra in the inertial range, where the magnetic energy spectral index is in the range from $-2.3$ to $-2.1$, while the kinetic energy spectral index is slightly steeper, in the range from $-2.5$ to $-2.3$. The anisotropy of turbulence eddies is found to be nearly scale-independent, in contrast with the prediction of the Goldreich-Sridhar theory for anisotropic turbulence in a homogeneous plasma permeated by a uniform magnetic field.
  • The effects of line-tying on resistive tearing instability in slab geometry is studied within the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD).\citep{KadomtsevP1974,Strauss1976} It is found that line-tying has a stabilizing effect. The tearing mode is stabilized when the system length $L$ is shorter than a critical length $L_{c}$, which is independent of the resistivity $\eta$. When $L$ is not too much longer than $L_{c}$, the growthrate $\gamma$ is proportional to $\eta$ . When $L$ is sufficiently long, the tearing mode scaling $\gamma\sim\eta^{3/5}$ is recovered. The transition from $\gamma\sim\eta$ to $\gamma\sim\eta^{3/5}$ occurs at a transition length $L_{t}\sim\eta^{-2/5}$.
  • As modeling of collisionless magnetic reconnection in most space plasmas with realistic parameters is beyond the capability of today's simulations, due to the separation between global and kinetic length scales, it is important to establish scaling relations in model problems so as to extrapolate to realistic scales. Recently, large scale particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of island coalescence have shown that the time averaged reconnection rate decreases with system size, while fluid systems at such large scales in the Hall regime have not been studied. Here we perform the complementary resistive MHD, Hall MHD and two fluid simulations using a ten-moment model with the same geometry. In contrast to the standard Harris sheet reconnection problem, Hall MHD is insufficient to capture the physics of the reconnection region. Additionally, motivated by the results of a recent set of hybrid simulations which show the importance of ion kinetics in this geometry, we evaluate the efficacy of the ten-moment model in reproducing such results.
  • Supra-arcade fans are bright, irregular regions of emission that develop during eruptive flares, above flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection site which would be extremely difficult to observe directly because of their low density. It has been suggested that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low density jet plasma. The head of a low density jet directed towards higher density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low and high density fingers along the interface. Using SDO/AIA 131A images, we show details of SADs seen from three different orientations with respect to the flare arcade and current sheet, and highlight features that have been previously unexplained, such as the splitting of SADs at their heads, but are a natural consequence of instabilities above the arcade. Comparison with 3-D magnetohydrodynamic simulations suggests that supra-arcade downflows are the result of secondary instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type in the exhaust of reconnection jets.
  • Magnetic fields without a direction of continuous symmetry have the generic feature that neighboring field lines exponentiate away from each other and become stochastic, hence the ideal constraint of preserving magnetic field line connectivity becomes exponentially sensitive to small deviations from ideal Ohm's law. The idea of breaking field line connectivity by stochasticity as a mechanism for fast reconnection is tested with numerical simulations based on reduced magnetohydrodynamics equations with a strong guide field line-tied to two perfectly conducting end plates. Starting from an ideally stable force-free equilibrium, the system is allowed to undergo resistive relaxation. Two distinct phases are found in the process of resistive relaxation. During the quasi-static phase, rapid change of field line connectivity and strong induced flow are found in regions of high field line exponentiation. However, although the field line connectivity of individual field lines can change rapidly, the overall pattern of field line mapping appears to deform gradually. From this perspective, field line exponentiation appears to cause enhanced diffusion rather than reconnection. In some cases, resistive quasi-static evolution can cause the ideally stable initial equilibrium to cross a stability threshold, leading to formation of intense current filaments and rapid change of field line mapping into a qualitatively different pattern. It is in this onset phase that the change of field line connectivity is more appropriately designated as magnetic reconnection. Our results show that rapid change of field line connectivity appears to be a necessary, but not a sufficient condition for fast reconnection.
  • Magnetic reconnection mediated by the hyper-resistive plasmoid instability is studied with both linear analysis and nonlinear simulations. The linear growth rate is found to scale as $S_{H}^{1/6}$ with respect to the hyper-resistive Lundquist number $S_{H}\equiv L^{3}V_{A}/\eta_{H}$, where $L$ is the system size, $V_{A}$ is the Alfv\'en velocity, and $\eta_{H}$ is the hyper-resistivity. In the nonlinear regime, reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of $S_{H}$, the number of plasmoids scales as $S_{H}^{1/2}$, and the secondary current sheet length and width both scale as $S_{H}^{-1/2}$. These scalings are consistent with a heuristic argument assuming secondary current sheets are close to marginal stability. The distribution of plasmoids as a function of the enclosed flux $\psi$ is found to obey a $\psi^{-1}$ power law over an extended range, followed by a rapid fall off for large plasmoids. These results are compared with those from resistive magnetohydrodynamic studies.
  • Our understanding of magnetic reconnection in resistive magnetohydrodynamics has gone through a fundamental change in recent years. The conventional wisdom is that magnetic reconnection mediated by resistivity is slow in laminar high Lundquist ($S$) plasmas, constrained by the scaling of the reconnection rate predicted by Sweet-Parker theory. However, recent studies have shown that when $S$ exceeds a critical value $\sim10^{4}$, the Sweet-Parker current sheet is unstable to a super-Alfv\'enic plasmoid instability, with a linear growth rate that scales as $S^{1/4}$. In the fully developed statistical steady state of two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the normalized average reconnection rate is approximately 0.01, nearly independent of $S$, and the distribution function $f(\psi)$ of plasmoid magnetic flux $\psi$ follows a power law $f(\psi)\sim\psi^{-1}$. When Hall effects are included, the plasmoid instability may trigger onset of Hall reconnection even when the conventional criterion for onset is not satisfied. The rich variety of possible reconnection dynamics is organized in the framework of a phase diagram.
  • The distribution function $f(\psi)$ of magnetic flux $\psi$ in plasmoids formed in high-Lundquist-number current sheets is studied by means of an analytic phenomenological model and direct numerical simulations. The distribution function is shown to follow a power law $f(\psi)\sim\psi^{-1}$, which differs from other recent theoretical predictions. Physical explanations are given for the discrepant predictions of other theoretical models.
  • The role of a super-Alfv\'enic plasmoid instability in the onset of fast reconnection is studied by means of the largest Hall magnetohydrodynamics simulations to date, with system sizes up to $10^{4}$ ion skin depths ($d_{i}$). It is demonstrated that the plasmoid instability can facilitate the onset of rapid Hall reconnection, in a regime where the onset would otherwise be inaccessible because the Sweet-Parker width is significantly above $d_{i}$. However, the topology of Hall reconnection is not inevitably a single stable X-point. There exists an intermediate regime where the single X-point topology itself exhibits instability, causing the system to alternate between a single X-point geometry and an extended current sheet with multiple X-points produced by the plasmoid instability. Through a series of simulations with various system sizes relative to $d_{i}$, it is shown that system size affects the accessibility of the intermediate regime. The larger the system size is, the easier it is to realize the intermediate regime. Although our Hall MHD model lacks many important physical effects included in fully kinetic models, the fact that a single X-point geometry is not inevitable raises the interesting possibility for the first time that Hall MHD simulations may have the potential to realize reconnection with geometrical features similar to those seen in fully kinetic simulations, namely, extended current sheets and plasmoid formation.
  • An overview of some recent progress on magnetohydrodynamic stability and current sheet formation in a line-tied system is given. Key results on the linear stability of the ideal internal kink mode and resistive tearing mode are summarized. For nonlinear problems, a counterexample to the recent demonstration of current sheet formation by Low \emph{et al}. [B. C. Low and \AA. M. Janse, Astrophys. J. \textbf{696}, 821 (2009)] is presented, and the governing equations for quasi-static evolution of a boundary driven, line-tied magnetic field are derived. Some open questions and possible strategies to resolve them are discussed.
  • The Sweet-Parker layer in a system that exceeds a critical value of the Lundquist number ($S$) is unstable to the plasmoid instability. In this paper, a numerical scaling study has been done with an island coalescing system driven by a low level of random noise. In the early stage, a primary Sweet-Parker layer forms between the two coalescing islands. The primary Sweet-Parker layer breaks into multiple plasmoids and even thinner current sheets through multiple levels of cascading if the Lundquist number is greater than a critical value $S_{c}\simeq4\times10^{4}$. As a result of the plasmoid instability, the system realizes a fast nonlinear reconnection rate that is nearly independent of $S$, and is only weakly dependent on the level of noise. The number of plasmoids in the linear regime is found to scales as $S^{3/8}$, as predicted by an earlier asymptotic analysis (Loureiro \emph{et al.}, Phys. Plasmas \textbf{14}, 100703 (2007)). In the nonlinear regime, the number of plasmoids follows a steeper scaling, and is proportional to $S$. The thickness and length of current sheets are found to scale as $S^{-1}$, and the local current densities of current sheets scale as $S^{-1}$. Heuristic arguments are given in support of theses scaling relations.
  • Shear flow instabilities can profoundly affect the diffusion of momentum in jets, stars, and disks. The Richardson criterion gives a sufficient condition for instability of a shear flow in a stratified medium. The velocity gradient $V'$ can only destabilize a stably stratified medium with squared Brunt-Vaisala frequency $N^2$ if $V'^2/4>N^2$. We find this is no longer true when the medium is a magnetized plasma. We investigate the effect of stable stratification on magnetic field and velocity profiles unstable to magneto-shear instabilities, i.e., instabilities which require the presence of both magnetic field and shear flow. We show that a family of profiles originally studied by Tatsuno & Dorland (2006) remain unstable even when $V'^2/4<N^2$, violating the Richardson criterion. However, not all magnetic fields can result in a violation of the Richardson criterion. We consider a class of flows originally considered by Kent (1968), which are destabilized by a constant magnetic field, and show that they become stable when $V'^2/4<N^2$, as predicted by the Richardson criterion. This suggests that magnetic free energy is required to violate the Richardson criterion. This work implies that the Richardson criterion cannot be used when evaluating the ideal stability of a sheared, stably stratified, and magnetized plasma. We briefly discuss the implications for astrophysical systems.
  • This paper presents Sweet-Parker type scaling arguments in the context of hyper-resistive Hall magnetohyrdodynamics (MHD). The predicted steady state scalings are consistent with those found by Chac\'on et al. [PRL 99, 235001 (2007)], though as with that study, no prediction of electron dissipation region \emph{length} is made. Numerical experiments confirm that both cusp-like and modestly more extended geometries are realizable. However, importantly, the length of the electron dissipation region, which is taken as a parameter by several recent studies, is found to depend explicitly on the level of hyper-resistivity. Furthermore, although hyper-resistivity can produce more extended electron dissipation regions, the length of the region remains smaller than one ion skin depth for the largest values of hyper-resistivity considered here. These electron dissipation regions are significantly shorter than those seen in many recent kinetic studies. The length of the electron dissipation region is found to depend on electron inertia as well, scaling like $(m_e/m_i)^{3/8}$. However, the thickness of the region appears to scale similarly, so that the aspect ratio is at most very weakly dependent on $(m_e/m_i)$. The limitations of scaling theories which do not predict the length of the electron dissipation region are emphasized.
  • Thin current sheets in systems of large size that exceed a critical value of the Lundquist number are unstable to a super-Alfvenic tearing instability. The scaling of the growth rate of the fastest growing instability with respect to the Lundquist number is shown to follow from the classical dispersion relation for tearing modes. As a result of this instability, the system realizes a nonlinear reconnection rate that appears to be weakly dependent on the Lundquist number, and larger than the Sweet-Parker rate by an order of magnitude (for the range of Lundquist numbers considered). This regime of fast reconnection appears to be realizable in a dynamic and highly unstable thin current sheet, without requiring the current sheet to be turbulent.
  • The recent demonstration of current singularity formation by Low et al. assumes that potential fields will remain potential under simple expansion or compression (Low 2006, 2007; Janse & Low 2009). An explicit counterexample to their key assumption is constructed. Our findings suggest that their results may need to be reconsidered.
  • It is well known that the radial displacement of the $m=1$ internal kink mode in a periodic screw pinch has a steep jump at the resonant surface where $\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{B}=0$. In a line-tied system, relevant to solar and astrophysical plasmas, the resonant surface is no longer a valid concept. It is then of interest to see how line-tying alters the aforementioned result for a periodic system. If the line-tied kink also produces a steep gradient, corresponding to a thin current layer, it may lead to strong resistive effects even with weak dissipation. Numerical solution of the eigenmode equations shows that the fastest growing kink mode in a line-tied system still possesses a jump in the radial displacement at the location coincident with the resonant surface of the fastest growing mode in the periodic counterpart. However, line-tying thickens the inner layer and slows down the growth rate. As the system length $L$ approaches infinity, both the inner layer thickness and the growth rate approach the periodic values. In the limit of small $\epsilon\sim B_{\phi}/B_{z}$, the critical length for instability $L_{c}\sim\epsilon^{-3}$. The relative increase in the inner layer thickness due to line-tying scales as $\epsilon^{-1}(L_{c}/L)^{2.5}$.
  • Differential rotation occurs in conducting flows in accretion disks and planetary cores. In such systems, the magnetorotational instability can arise from coupling Lorentz and centrifugal forces to cause large radial angular momentum fluxes. We present the first experimental observation of the magnetorotational instability. Our system consists of liquid sodium between differentially rotating spheres, with an imposed coaxial magnetic field. We characterize the observed patterns, dynamics and torque increases, and establish that this instability can occur from a hydrodynamic turbulent background.