• In this paper, we develop a distributed intermittent communication and task planning framework for mobile robot teams. The goal of the robots is to accomplish complex tasks, captured by local Linear Temporal Logic formulas, and share the collected information with all other robots and possibly also with a user. Specifically, we consider situations where the robot communication capabilities are not sufficient to form reliable and connected networks while the robots move to accomplish their tasks. In this case, intermittent communication protocols are necessary that allow the robots to temporarily disconnect from the network in order to accomplish their tasks free of communication constraints. We assume that the robots can only communicate with each other when they meet at common locations in space. Our distributed control framework jointly determines local plans that allow all robots fulfill their assigned temporal tasks, sequences of communication events that guarantee information exchange infinitely often, and optimal communication locations that minimize a desired distance metric. Simulation results verify the efficacy of the proposed controllers.
  • This paper proposes a new optimal control synthesis algorithm for multi-robot systems under global temporal logic tasks. Existing planning approaches under global temporal goals rely on graph search techniques applied to a product automaton constructed among the robots. In this paper, we propose a new sampling-based algorithm that builds incrementally trees that approximate the state-space and transitions of the synchronous product automaton. By approximating the product automaton by a tree rather than representing it explicitly, we require much fewer memory resources to store it and motion plans can be found by tracing sequences of parent nodes without the need for sophisticated graph search methods. This significantly increases the scalability of our algorithm compared to existing optimal control synthesis methods. We also show that the proposed algorithm is probabilistically complete and asymptotically optimal. Finally, we present numerical experiments showing that our approach can synthesize optimal plans from product automata with billions of states, which is not possible using standard optimal control synthesis algorithms or off-the-shelf model checkers.
  • This paper considers the problem of distributed state estimation using multi-robot systems. The robots have limited communication capabilities and, therefore, communicate their measurements intermittently only when they are physically close to each other. To decrease the distance that the robots need to travel only to communicate, we divide them into small teams that can communicate at different locations to share information and update their beliefs. Then, we propose a new distributed scheme that combines (i) communication schedules that ensure that the network is intermittently connected, and (ii) sampling-based motion planning for the robots in every team with the objective to collect optimal measurements and decide a location for those robots to communicate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first distributed state estimation framework that relaxes all network connectivity assumptions, and controls intermittent communication events so that the estimation uncertainty is minimized. We present simulation results that demonstrate significant improvement in estimation accuracy compared to methods that maintain an end-to-end connected network for all time.
  • In this paper, we present a control framework that allows magnetic microrobot teams to accomplish complex micromanipulation tasks captured by global Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) formulas. To address this problem, we propose an optimal control synthesis method that constructs discrete plans for the robots that satisfy both the assigned tasks as well as proximity constraints between the robots due to the physics of the problem. Our proposed algorithm relies on an existing optimal control synthesis approach combined with a novel technique to reduce the state-space of the product automaton that is associated with the LTL specifications. The synthesized discrete plans are executed by the microrobots independently using local magnetic fields. Simulation studies show that the proposed algorithm can address large-scale planning problems that cannot be solved using existing optimal control synthesis approaches. Moreover, we present experimental results that also illustrate the potential of our method in practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first control framework that allows independent control of teams of magnetic microrobots for temporal micromanipulation tasks.
  • In this paper, we propose an intermittent communication framework for mobile robot networks. Specifically, we consider robots that move along the edges of a connected mobility graph and communicate only when they meet at the nodes of that graph giving rise to a dynamic communication network. Our proposed distributed controllers ensure intermittent connectivity of the network and path optimization, simultaneously. We show that the intermittent connectivity requirement can be encapsulated by a global Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) formula. Then we approximately decompose it into local LTL expressions which are then assigned to the robots. To avoid conflicting robot behaviors that can occur due to this approximate decomposition, we develop a distributed conflict resolution scheme that generates non-conflicting discrete motion plans for every robot, based on the assigned local LTL expressions, whose composition satisfies the global LTL formula. By appropriately introducing delays in the execution of the generated motion plans we also show that the proposed controllers can be executed asynchronously.