• Planar object tracking is an actively studied problem in vision-based robotic applications. While several benchmarks have been constructed for evaluating state-of-the-art algorithms, there is a lack of video sequences captured in the wild rather than in constrained laboratory environment. In this paper, we present a carefully designed planar object tracking benchmark containing 210 videos of 30 planar objects sampled in the natural environment. In particular, for each object, we shoot seven videos involving various challenging factors, namely scale change, rotation, perspective distortion, motion blur, occlusion, out-of-view, and unconstrained. The ground truth is carefully annotated semi-manually to ensure the quality. Moreover, eleven state-of-the-art algorithms are evaluated on the benchmark using two evaluation metrics, with detailed analysis provided for the evaluation results. We expect the proposed benchmark to benefit future studies on planar object tracking.
  • We present a novel framework that learns to predict human anatomy from body surface. Specifically, our approach generates a synthetic X-ray image of a person only from the person's surface geometry. Furthermore, the synthetic X-ray image is parametrized and can be manipulated by adjusting a set of body markers which are also generated during the X-ray image prediction. With the proposed framework, multiple synthetic X-ray images can easily be generated by varying surface geometry. By perturbing the parameters, several additional synthetic X-ray images can be generated from the same surface geometry. As a result, our approach offers a potential to overcome the training data barrier in the medical domain. This capability is achieved by learning a pair of networks - one learns to generate the full image from the partial image and a set of parameters, and the other learns to estimate the parameters given the full image. During training, the two networks are trained iteratively such that they would converge to a solution where the predicted parameters and the full image are consistent with each other. In addition to medical data enrichment, our framework can also be used for image completion as well as anomaly detection.
  • A major challenge in understanding the generalization of deep learning is to explain why (stochastic) gradient descent can exploit the network architecture to find solutions that have good generalization performance when using high capacity models. We find simple but realistic examples showing that this phenomenon exists even when learning linear classifiers --- between two linear networks with the same capacity, the one with a convolutional layer can generalize better than the other when the data distribution has some underlying spatial structure. We argue that this difference results from a combination of the convolution architecture, data distribution and gradient descent, all of which are necessary to be included in a meaningful analysis. We provide a general analysis of the generalization performance as a function of data distribution and convolutional filter size, given gradient descent as the optimization algorithm, then interpret the results using concrete examples. Experimental results show that our analysis is able to explain what happens in our introduced examples.
  • Quantitative understanding of relationships between students' behavioral patterns and academic performances is a significant step towards personalized education. In contrast to previous studies that mainly based on questionnaire surveys, in this paper, we collect behavioral records from 18,960 undergraduate students' smart cards and propose a novel metric, called orderness, which measures the regularity of campus daily life (e.g., meals and showers) of each student. Empirical analysis demonstrates that academic performance (GPA) is strongly correlated with orderness. Furthermore, we show that orderness is an important feature to predict academic performance, which remarkably improves the prediction accuracy even at the presence of students' diligence. Based on these analyses, education administrators could better guide students' campus lives and implement effective interventions in an early stage when necessary.
  • We study a novel multi-armed bandit problem that models the challenge faced by a company wishing to explore new strategies to maximize revenue whilst simultaneously maintaining their revenue above a fixed baseline, uniformly over time. While previous work addressed the problem under the weaker requirement of maintaining the revenue constraint only at a given fixed time in the future, the algorithms previously proposed are unsuitable due to their design under the more stringent constraints. We consider both the stochastic and the adversarial settings, where we propose, natural, yet novel strategies and analyze the price for maintaining the constraints. Amongst other things, we prove both high probability and expectation bounds on the regret, while we also consider both the problem of maintaining the constraints with high probability or expectation. For the adversarial setting the price of maintaining the constraint appears to be higher, at least for the algorithm considered. A lower bound is given showing that the algorithm for the stochastic setting is almost optimal. Empirical results obtained in synthetic environments complement our theoretical findings.
  • We consider a sequential learning problem with Gaussian payoffs and side information: after selecting an action $i$, the learner receives information about the payoff of every action $j$ in the form of Gaussian observations whose mean is the same as the mean payoff, but the variance depends on the pair $(i,j)$ (and may be infinite). The setup allows a more refined information transfer from one action to another than previous partial monitoring setups, including the recently introduced graph-structured feedback case. For the first time in the literature, we provide non-asymptotic problem-dependent lower bounds on the regret of any algorithm, which recover existing asymptotic problem-dependent lower bounds and finite-time minimax lower bounds available in the literature. We also provide algorithms that achieve the problem-dependent lower bound (up to some universal constant factor) or the minimax lower bounds (up to logarithmic factors).