• The layered ternary compound TaIrTe4 is an important candidate to host the recently predicted type-II Weyl Fermions. However, a direct and definitive proof of the absence of inversion symmetry in this material, a prerequisite for the existence of Weyl Fermions, has so far remained evasive. Herein, an unambiguous identification of the broken inversion symmetry in TaIrTe4 is established using angle-resolved polarized Raman spectroscopy. Combining with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate an efficient and nondestructive recipe to determine the exact crystallographic orientation of TaIrTe4 crystals. Such technique could be extended to the fast identification and characterization of other type-II Weyl Fermions candidates. A surprisingly strong in-plane electrical anisotropy in TaIrTe4 thin flakes is also revealed, up to 200% at 10K, which is the strongest known electrical anisotropy for materials with comparable carrier density, notably in such good metals as copper and silver.
  • Few-layer black phosphorus (FLBP), a recently discovered two-dimensional semiconductor, has attracted substantial attention in the scientific and technical communities due to its great potential in electronic and optoelectronic applications. However, reactivity of FLBP flakes with ambient species limits its direct applications. Among various methods to passivate FLBP in ambient environment, nanocomposites mixing FLBP flakes with stable matrix may be one of the most promising approaches for industry applications. Here, we report a simple one-step procedure to mass produce air-stable FLBP/phospholipids nanocomposite in liquid phase. The resultant nanocomposite is found to have ultralow tunneling barrier for charge carriers which can be described by an Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping mechanism. Devices made from such mass-produced FLBP/phospholipids nanocomposite show highly stable electrical conductivity and opto-electrical response in ambient conditions, indicating its promising applications in both electronic and optoelectronic applications. This method could also be generalized to the mass production of nanocomposites consisting of other air-sensitive two-dimensional materials, such as FeSe, NbSe2, WTe2, etc.