• Small-cell architecture is widely adopted by cellular network operators to increase network capacity. By reducing the size of cells, operators can pack more (low-power) base stations in an area to better serve the growing demands, without causing extra interference. However, this approach suffers from low spectrum temporal efficiency. When a cell becomes smaller and covers fewer users, its total traffic fluctuates significantly due to insufficient traffic aggregation and exhibiting a large "peak-to-mean" ratio. As operators customarily provision spectrum for peak traffic, large traffic temporal fluctuation inevitably leads to low spectrum temporal efficiency. In this paper, we advocate device-to-device (D2D) load-balancing as a useful mechanism to address the fundamental drawback of small-cell architecture. The idea is to shift traffic from a congested cell to its adjacent under-utilized cells by leveraging inter-cell D2D communication, so that the traffic can be served without using extra spectrum, effectively improving the spectrum temporal efficiency. We provide theoretical modeling and analysis to characterize the benefit of D2D load balancing, in terms of total spectrum requirements of all individual cells. We also derive the corresponding cost, in terms of incurred D2D traffic overhead. We carry out empirical evaluations based on real-world 4G data traces to gauge the benefit and cost of D2D load balancing under practical settings. The results show that D2D load balancing can reduce the spectrum requirement by 25% as compared to the standard scenario without D2D load balancing, at the expense of negligible 0.7% D2D traffic overhead.
  • By offloading intensive computation tasks to the edge cloud located at the cellular base stations, mobile-edge computation offloading (MECO) has been regarded as a promising means to accomplish the ambitious millisecond-scale end-to-end latency requirement of the fifth-generation networks. In this paper, we investigate the latency-minimization problem in a multi-user time-division multiple access MECO system with joint communication and computation resource allocation. Three different computation models are studied, i.e., local compression, edge cloud compression, and partial compression offloading. First, closed-form expressions of optimal resource allocation and minimum system delay for both local and edge cloud compression models are derived. Then, for the partial compression offloading model, we formulate a piecewise optimization problem and prove that the optimal data segmentation strategy has a piecewise structure. Based on this result, an optimal joint communication and computation resource allocation algorithm is developed. To gain more insights, we also analyze a specific scenario where communication resource is adequate while computation resource is limited. In this special case, the closed-form solution of the piecewise optimization problem can be derived. Our proposed algorithms are finally verified by numerical results, which show that the novel partial compression offloading model can significantly reduce the end-to-end latency.