• We propose a quantum field theory description of the X-cube model of fracton topological order. The field theory is not (and cannot be) a topological quantum field theory (TQFT), since unlike the X-cube model, TQFTs are invariant (i.e. symmetric) under continuous spacetime transformations. However, the theory is instead invariant under a certain subgroup of the conformal group. We describe how braiding statistics and ground state degeneracy are reproduced by the field theory, and how the the X-cube Hamiltonian and field theory can be minimally coupled to matter fields. We also show that even on a manifold with trivial topology, spatial curvature can induce a ground state degeneracy that is stable to arbitrary local perturbations! Our formalism may allow for the description of other fracton field theories, where the only necessary input is an equation of motion for a charge density.
  • We investigate possible topological superconductivity in the Kondo-Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice, where the Kitaev spin liquid is coupled to conduction electrons via the Kondo coupling. We use the self-consistent Abrikosov-fermion mean-field theory to map out the phase diagram. Upon increasing the Kondo coupling, a first order transition occurs from the decoupled phase of spin liquid and conduction electrons to a ferromagnetic topological superconductor of Class D with a single chiral Majorana edge mode. This is followed by a second order transition into a paramagnetic topological superconductor of Class DIII with a single helical Majorana edge mode. These findings offer a novel route to topological superconductivity in the Kondo lattice system. We discuss the connection between topological nature of the Kitaev spin liquid and topological superconductors obtained in this model.
  • Fracton order is a new kind of quantum order characterized by topological excitations that exhibit remarkable mobility restrictions and a robust ground state degeneracy (GSD) which can increase exponentially with system size. In this paper, we present a generic lattice construction (in three dimensions) for a generalized X-cube model of fracton order, where the mobility restrictions of the subdimensional particles inherit the geometry of the lattice. This helps explain a previous result that lattice curvature can produce a robust GSD, even on a manifold with trivial topology. We provide explicit examples to show that the (zero temperature) phase of matter is sensitive to the lattice geometry. In one example, the lattice geometry confines the dimension-1 particles to small loops, which allows the fractons to be fully mobile charges, and the resulting phase is equivalent to (3+1)-dimensional toric code. However, the phase is sensitive to more than just lattice curvature; different lattices without curvature (e.g. cubic or stacked kagome lattices) also result in different phases of matter, which are separated by phase transitions. Unintuitively however, according to a previous definition of phase [Chen, Gu, Wen 2010], even just a rotated or rescaled cubic lattice results in different phases of matter, which motivates us to propose a new and coarser definition of phase for gapped ground states and fracton order. The new equivalence relation between ground states is given by the composition of a local unitary transformation and a quasi-isometry (which can rotate and rescale the lattice); equivalently, ground states are in the same phase if they can be adiabatically connected by varying both the Hamiltonian and the positions of the degrees of freedom (via a quasi-isometry). In light of the importance of geometry, we further propose that fracton orders should be regarded as a geometric order.
  • We propose a theoretical model for a gapless spin liquid phase that may have been observed in a recent experiment on $\mathrm{H_3Li Ir_2 O_6}$. Despite the insulating and non-magnetic nature of the material, the specific heat coefficient $C/T \sim 1/\sqrt{T}$ in zero magnetic field and $C/T \sim T/ B^{3/2}$ with finite magnetic field $B$ have been observed. In addition, the NMR relaxation rate shows $1/(T_1T) \sim (C/T)^2$. Motivated by the fact that the interlayer/in-plane lattice parameters are reduced/elongated by the hydrogen-intercalation of the parent compound $\mathrm{Li_2 Ir O_3}$, we consider four layers of the Kitaev honeycomb lattice model with additional interlayer exchange interactions. It is shown that the resulting spin liquid excitations reside mostly in the top and bottom layers of such a layered structure and possess a quartic dispersion. In an applied magnetic field, each quartic mode is split into four Majorana cones with the velocity $v \sim B^{3/4}$. We suggest that the spin liquid phase in these "defect" layers, placed between different stacking patterns of the honeycomb layers, can explain the major phenomenology of the experiment, which can be taken as evidence that the Kitaev interaction plays the primary role in the formation of a quantum spin liquid in this material.
  • The spin liquid phase is one of the prominent strongly interacting topological phases of matter whose unambiguous confirmation is yet to be reached despite intensive experimental efforts on numerous candidate materials. Recently, a new family of correlated honeycomb materials, in which strong spin-orbit coupling allows for various bond-dependent spin interactions, have been promising candidates to realize the Kitaev spin liquid. Here we study a model with bond-dependent spin interactions and show numerical evidence for the existence of an extended quantum spin liquid region, which is possibly connected to the Kitaev spin liquid state. These results are used to provide an explanation of the scattering continuum seen in neutron scattering on $\alpha$-RuCl$_3$.
  • Quantum to classical crossover is a fundamental question in dynamics of quantum many-body systems. In frustrated magnets, for example, it is highly non-trivial to describe the crossover from the classical spin liquid with a macroscopically-degenerate ground-state manifold, to the quantum spin liquid phase with fractionalized excitations. This is an important issue as we often encounter the demand for a sharp distinction between the classical and quantum spin liquid behaviors in real materials. Here we take the example of the classical spin liquid in a frustrated magnet with novel bond-dependent interactions to investigate the classical dynamics, and critically compare it with quantum dynamics in the same system. In particular, we focus on signatures in the dynamical spin structure factor. Combining Landau-Lifshitz dynamics simulations and the analytical Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) approach, we show that the low energy spectra are described by relaxational dynamics and highly constrained by the zero mode structure of the underlying degenerate classical manifold. Further, the higher energy spectra can be explained by precessional dynamics. Surprisingly, many of these features can also be seen in the dynamical structure factor in the quantum model studied by finite-temperature exact diagonalization. We discuss the implications of these results, and their connection to recent experiments on frustrated magnets with strong spin-orbit coupling.
  • Motivated by recent experiments on $\alpha$-RuCl$_3$, we investigate a possible quantum spin liquid ground state of the honeycomb-lattice spin model with bond-dependent interactions. We consider the $K-\Gamma$ model, where $K$ and $\Gamma$ represent the Kitaev and symmetric-anisotropic interactions between spin-1/2 moments on the honeycomb lattice. Using the infinite density matrix renormalization group (iDMRG), we provide compelling evidence for the existence of quantum spin liquid phases in an extended region of the phase diagram. In particular, we use transfer matrix spectra to show the evolution of two-particle excitations with well-defined two-dimensional dispersion, which is a strong signature of quantum spin liquid. These results are compared with predictions from Majorana mean-field theory and used to infer the quasiparticle excitation spectra. Further, we compute the dynamical structure factor using finite size cluster computations and show that the results resemble the scattering continuum seen in neutron scattering experiments on $\alpha$-RuCl$_3$. We discuss these results in light of recent and future experiments.
  • The family of "Kitaev materials" provides an ideal platform to study quantum spin liquids and their neighboring magnetic orders. Motivated by the possibility of a quantum spin liquid ground state in pressurized hyperhoneycomb iridate $\beta$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$, we systematically classify and study symmetric quantum spin liquids on the hyperhoneycomb lattice, using the Abrikosov-fermion representation. Among the 176 symmetric $U(1)$ spin liquids (and 160 $Z_2$ spin liquids), we identify 8 "root" $U(1)$ spin liquids in proximity to the ground state of the solvable Kitave model on hyperhonecyomb lattices. These 8 states are promising candidates for possible $U(1)$ spin liquid ground states in pressurized $\beta$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$. We further discuss physical properties of these 8 $U(1)$ spin liquid candidates, and show that they all support nodal-line-shaped spinon Fermi surfaces.
  • Among heavy fermion materials, there is a set of rare-earth intermetallics with non-Kramers Pr$^{3+}$ $4f^2$ moments which exhibit a rich phase diagram with intertwined quadrupolar orders, superconductivity, and non-Fermi liquid behavior. However, more subtle broken symmetries such as multipolar orders in these Kondo materials remain poorly studied. Here, we argue that multi-spin interactions between local moments beyond the conventional two-spin exchange must play an important role in Kondo materials near the ordered to heavy Fermi liquid transition. We show that this drives a plethora of phases with coexisting multipolar orders and multiple thermal phase transitions, providing a natural framework for interpreting experiments on the Pr(TM)$_2$Al$_{20}$ class of compounds.
  • Fracton topological order describes a remarkable phase of matter which can be characterized by fracton excitations with constrained dynamics and a ground state degeneracy that increases exponentially with the length of the system on a three-dimensional torus. However, previous models exhibiting this order require many-spin interactions which may be very difficult to realize in a real material or cold atom system. In this work, we present a more physically realistic model which has the so-called X-cube fracton topological order but only requires nearest-neighbor two-spin interactions. The model lives on a three-dimensional honeycomb-based lattice with one to two spin-1/2 degrees of freedom on each site and a unit cell of 6 sites. The model is constructed from two orthogonal stacks of $Z_2$ topologically ordered Kitaev honeycomb layers, which are coupled together by a two-spin interaction. It is also shown that a four-spin interaction can be included to instead stabilize 3+1D $Z_2$ topological order. We also find dual descriptions of four quantum phase transitions in our model, all of which appear to be discontinuous first order transitions.
  • Recently, thermal Hall effect has been observed in the paramagnetic state of Volborthite, which consists of distorted Kagome layers with $S=1/2$ local moments. Despite the appearance of a magnetic order below $1 \, \mathrm{K}$, the response to external magnetic field and unusual properties of the paramagnetic state above $1 \, \mathrm{K}$ suggest possible realization of exotic quantum phases. Motivated by these discoveries, we investigate possible spin liquid phases with fermionic spinon excitations in a non-symmorphic version of the Kagome lattice, which belongs to the two-dimensional crystallographic group $p2gg$. This non-symmorphic structure is consistent with the spin model obtained in the density functional theory (DFT) calculation. Using projective symmetry group (PSG) analysis and fermionic parton mean field theory, we identify twelve distinct $\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin liquid states, four of which are found to have correspondence in the eight Schwinger boson spin liquid states we classified earlier. We focus on the four fermionic states with bosonic counterpart and find that the spectrum of their corresponding root $U(1)$ states feature spinon Fermi surface. The existence of spinon Fermi surface in candidate spin liquid states may offer a possible explanation of the finite thermal Hall conductivity observed in Volborthite.
  • The Kagome-lattice-based material, Volborthite, $\mathrm{Cu_3 V_2 O_7 (OH)_2 \cdot 2 H_2 O}$, has been considered as a promising platform for discovery of unusual quantum ground states due to the frustrated nature of spin interactions. Here we explore possible quantum spin liquid and magnetically ordered phases in a two-dimensional non-symmorphic lattice described by $p2gg$ layer space group, which is consistent with the spatial anisotropy of the spin model derived from density functional theory (DFT) for Volborthite. Using the projective symmetry group (PSG) analysis and Schwinger boson mean field theory, we classify possible spin liquid phases with bosonic spinons and investigate magnetically ordered phases connected to such states. It is shown, in general, that only translationally invariant mean field states are allowed in two-dimensional non-symmorphic lattices, which simplifies the classification considerably. The mean field phase diagram of the DFT-derived spin model is studied and it is found that possible quantum spin liquid phases are connected to two types of magnetically ordered phases, a coplanar incommensurate $(q,0)$ spiral order as the ground state and a closely competing coplanar commensurate $(\pi,\pi)$ spin density wave order. In addition, periodicity enhancement of the two-spinon continuum, a signature of symmetry fractionalization, is found in the spin liquid phases connected to the $(\pi,\pi)$ spin density wave order. We discuss relevance of these results to recent and future experiments on Volborthite.
  • Na$_4$Ir$_3$O$_8$ provides a material platform to study three-dimensional quantum spin liquids in the geometrically frustrated hyperkagome lattice of Ir$^{4+}$ ions. In this work, we consider quantum spin liquids on hyperkagome lattice for generic spin models, focusing on the effects of anisotropic spin interactions. In particular, we classify possible $\mathbb{Z}_2$ and $U(1)$ spin liquid states, following the projective symmetry group analysis in the slave-fermion representation. There are only three distinct $\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin liquids, together with 2 different $U(1)$ spin liquids. The non-symmorphic space group symmetry of hyperkagome lattice plays a vital role in simplifying the classification, forbidding "$\pi$-flux" or "staggered-flux" phases in contrast to symmorphic space groups. We further prove that both $U(1)$ states and one $Z_2$ state among all 3 are symmetry-protected gapless spin liquids, robust against any symmetry-preserving perturbations. Motivated by the "spin-freezing" behavior recently observed in Na$_4$Ir$_3$O$_8$ at low temperatures, we further investigate the nearest-neighbor spin model with dominant Heisenberg interaction subject to all possible anisotropic perturbations from spin-orbit couplings. We found a $U(1)$ spin liquid ground state with spinon fermi surfaces is energetically favored over $Z_2$ states. Among all spin-orbit coupling terms, we show that only Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction can induce spin anisotropy in the ground state when perturbing from the isotropic Heisenberg limit. Our work paves the way for a systematic study of quantum spin liquids in various materials with a hyperkagome crystal structure.
  • There have been tremendous experimental and theoretical efforts toward discovery of quantum spin liquid phase in honeycomb-based-lattice materials with strong spin-orbit coupling. Here the bond-dependent Kitaev interaction between local moments provides strong magnetic frustration and if it is the only interaction present in the system, it will lead to an exactly solvable quantum spin liquid ground state. In all of these materials, however, the ground state is in a magnetically ordered phase due to additional interactions between local moments. Recently, it has been reported that the magnetic order in hyperhoneycomb material, $\beta$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$, is suppressed upon applying hydrostatic pressure and the resulting state becomes a quantum paramagnet or possibly a quantum spin liquid. Using ab-initio computations and strong coupling expansion, we investigate the lattice structure and resulting local moment model in pressurized $\beta$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$. Remarkably, the dominant interaction under high pressure is not the Kitaev interaction nor further neighbor interactions, but a different kind of bond-dependent interaction. This leads to strong magnetic frustration and may provide a platform for discovery of a new kind of quantum spin liquid ground state.
  • We demonstrate that topological Dirac semimetals, which possess two Dirac nodes, separated in momentum space along a rotation axis and protected by rotational symmetry, exhibit an additional quantum anomaly, distinct from the chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which we call the $ \mathbb Z_2$ anomaly, is a consequence of the fact that the Dirac nodes in topological Dirac semimetals carry a $\mathbb Z_2$ topological charge. The $\mathbb Z_2$ anomaly refers to nonconservation of this charge in the presence of external fields due to quantum effects and has observable consequences due to its interplay with the chiral anomaly. We discuss possible implications of this for the interpretation of magnetotransport experiments on topological Dirac semimetals. We also provide a possible explanation for the magnetic field dependent angular narrowing of the negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, observed in a recent experiment on Na$_3$Bi.
  • The Coulombic quantum spin liquid in quantum spin ice is an exotic quantum phase of matter that emerges on the pyrochlore lattice and is currently actively searched for. Motivated by recent experiments on the Yb-based breathing pyrochlore material Ba$_3$Yb$_2$Zn$_5$O$_{11}$, we theoretically study the phase diagram and magnetic properties of the relevant spin model. The latter takes the form of a quantum spin ice Hamiltonian on a breathing pyrochlore lattice, and we analyze the stability of the quantum spin liquid phase in the absence of the inversion symmetry which the lattice breaks explicitly at lattice sites. Using a gauge mean-field approach, we show that the quantum spin liquid occupies a finite region in parameter space. Moreover, there exists a direct quantum phase transition between the quantum spin liquid phase and featureless paramagnets, even though none of theses phases break any symmetry. At nonzero temperature, we show that breathing pyrochlores provide a much broader finite temperature spin liquid regime than their regular counterparts. We discuss the implications of the results for current experiments and make predictions for future experiments on breathing pyrochlores.
  • Frustrated quantum magnets not only provide exotic ground states and unusual magnetic structures, but also support unconventional excitations in many cases. Using a physically relevant spin model for a breathing pyrochlore lattice, we discuss the presence of topological linear band crossings of magnons in antiferromagnets. These are the analogs of Weyl fermions in electronic systems, which we dub Weyl magnons. The bulk Weyl magnon implies the presence of chiral magnon surface states forming arcs at finite energy. We argue that such antiferromagnets present a unique example in which Weyl points can be manipulated in situ in the laboratory by applied fields. We discuss their appearance specifically in the breathing pyrochlore lattice, and give some general discussion of conditions to find Weyl magnons and how they may be probed experimentally. Our work may inspire a re-examination of the magnetic excitations in many magnetically ordered systems.
  • A hallmark of Weyl semimetal is the existence of surface Fermi arcs connecting two surface-projected Weyl nodes with opposite chiralities. An intriguing question is what determines the connectivity of surface Fermi arcs, when multiple pairs of Weyl nodes are present. To answer this question, we first show that the locations of surface Fermi arcs are predominantly determined by the condition that the Zak phase integrated along the normal direction to the surface is $\pi$. More importantly, the Zak phase can reveal the peculiar topological structure of Weyl semimetal directly in the bulk. Here, we show that the non-trivial winding of the Zak phase around each projected Weyl node manifests itself as a topological defect of the Wannier-Stark ladder, the energy eigenstates emerging under an electric field. Remarkably, this structure leads to "bulk Fermi arcs," i.e., open line segments in the bulk momentum spectra. It is argued that bulk Fermi arcs should exist in conjunction with the surface counterparts to conserve the Weyl fermion number under an electric field, which is supported by explicit numerical evidence.
  • Hyperkagome iridate, Na$_4$Ir$_3$O$_8$, has been regarded as a promising candidate material for a three-dimensional quantum spin liquid. Here the three-dimensional network of corner-sharing triangles forms the hyperkagome lattice of Ir$^{4+}$ ions. Due to strong spin-orbit coupling, the local moments of Ir$^{4+}$ ions are described by the pseudospin $j_{\rm eff} = 1/2$ Kramers doublet. The Heisenberg model on this lattice is highly frustrated and quantum/classical versions have been studied in earlier literature. In this work, we derive a generic local-moment model beyond the Heisenberg limit for the hyperkagome iridate by considering multi-orbital interactions for all the $t_{2g}$ orbitals and spin-orbit coupling. The lifting of massive classical degeneracy in the Heisenberg model by various spin-anisotropy terms is investigated at the classical level and the resulting phase diagram is presented. We find that different anisotropy terms prefer distinct classes of magnetically ordered phases, often with various discrete degeneracy. The implications of our results for recent $\mu$SR and NMR experiments on this material and possible quantum spin liquid phases are discussed.
  • A number of experiments on the hyperkagome iridate, Na$_4$Ir$_3$O$_8$, suggest existence of a gapless quantum spin liquid state at low temperature. Circumventing the slave particle approach commonly used in theoretical analyses of frustrated magnets, we provide a more intuitive, albeit more phenomenological, construction of a quantum spin liquid state for the hyperkagome Heisenberg model. An effective monomer-dimer model on the hyperkagome lattice is proposed a la Hao and Tchernyshyov's approach cultivated from the Husimi cactus model. Employing an arrow representation for the monomer-dimer model, we obtain a compact $U(1)$ gauge theory with a finite density of Fermionic spinons on the hyperoctagon lattice. The resulting theory and its mean field treatments lead to remarkable agreement with previous slave-particle construction of a quantum spin liquid state on the hyperkagome lattice. Our results offer novel insights on theoretical understanding of the emergence of spinon Fermi surfaces and useful predictions for future experiments.
  • Motivated by the recent discovery of a new family of Chromium based superconductors, we consider a two-band model, where a band of electrons dispersing only in one direction interacts with a band of electrons dispersing in all three directions. Strong $2k_f$ density fluctuations in the one-dimensional band induces attractive interactions between the three-dimensional electrons, which, in turn makes the system superconducting. Solving the associated Eliashberg equations, we obtain a gap function which is peaked at the "poles" of the three-dimensional Fermi sphere, and decreases towards the "equator". When strong enough local repulsion is included, the gap actually changes sign around the "equator" and nodal rings are formed. These nodal rings manifest themselves in several experimentally observable quantities, some of which resemble unconventional observations in the newly discovered superconductors which motivated this work.
  • We provide a theory of triplon dynamics in the valence bond solid ground state of the coupled spin-ladders modelled for BiCu$_2$PO$_6$. Utilizing the recent high quality neutron scattering data [Nature Physics (2015), DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS3566] as guides and a theory of interacting triplons via the bond operator formulation, we determine a minimal spin Hamiltonian for this system. It is shown that the splitting of the low energy triplon modes and the peculiar magnetic field dependence of the triplon dispersions can be explained by including substantial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya and symmetric anisotropic spin interactions. Taking into account the interactions between triplons and the decay of the triplons to the two-triplon continuum via anisotropic spin interactions, we provide a theoretical picture that can be used to understand the main features of the recent neutron scattering experimental data.
  • Motivated by recent experiments on the quantum-spin-liquid candidate material LiZn2Mo3O8, we study a single-band extended Hubbard model on an anisotropic Kagome lattice with the 1/6 electron filling. Due to the partial filling of the lattice, the inter-site repulsive interaction is necessary to generate Mott insulators, where electrons are localized in clusters, rather than at lattice sites. It is shown that these cluster Mott insulators are generally U(1) quantum spin liquids with spinon Fermi surfaces. The nature of charge excitations in cluster Mott insulators can be quite different from conventional Mott insulator and we show that there exists a novel cluster Mott insulator where charge fluctuations around the hexagonal cluster induce a plaquette charge order (PCO). The spinon excitation spectrum in this spin-liquid cluster Mott insulator is reconstructed due to the PCO so that only 1/3 of the total spinon excitations are magnetically active. Based on these results, we propose that the two Curie-Weiss regimes of the spin susceptibility in LiZn2Mo3O8 may be explained by finite-temperature properties of the cluster Mott insulator with the PCO as well as fractionalized spinon excitations. Existing and possible future experiments on LiZn2Mo3O8, and other Mo-based cluster magnets are discussed in light of these theoretical predictions.
  • Motivated by recent experiments on the vanadium oxyfluoride material DQVOF, we examine possible spin liquid phases on a breathing kagome lattice of S=1/2 spins. By performing a projective symmetry group analysis, we determine the possible phases for both fermionic and bosonic $\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin liquids on this lattice, and establish the correspondence between the two. The nature of the ground state of the Heisenberg model on the isotropic kagome lattice is a hotly debated topic, with both $\mathbb{Z}_2$ and U(1) spin liquids argued to be plausible ground states. Using variational Monte Carlo techniques, we show that a gapped $\mathbb{Z}_2$ spin liquid emerges as the clear ground state in the presence of this breathing anisotropy. Our results suggest that the breathing anisotropy helps to stabilize this spin liquid ground state, which may aid us in understanding the results of experiments and help to direct future numerical studies on these systems.
  • We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect.