• Quantum entanglement is the key resource for quantum information processing. Device-independent certification of entangled states is a long standing open question, which arouses the concept of self-testing. The central aim of self-testing is to certify the state and measurements of quantum systems without any knowledge of their inner workings, even when the used devices cannot be trusted. Specifically, utilizing Bell's theorem, it is possible to place a boundary on the singlet fidelity of entangled qubits. Here, beyond this rough estimation, we experimentally demonstrate a complete self-testing process for various pure bipartite entangled states up to four dimensions, by simply inspecting the correlations of the measurement outcomes. We show that this self-testing process can certify the exact form of entangled states with fidelities higher than 99.9% for all the investigated scenarios, which indicates the superior completeness and robustness of this method. Our work promotes self-testing as a practical tool for developing quantum techniques.
  • Probing collective spin dynamics is a current challenge in the field of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and has important applications in material analysis and quantum information protocols. Recently, the rare-earth ion doped crystals are an attractive candidate for making long-lived quantum memory. Further enhancement of its performance would benefit from the direct knowledge on the dynamics of nuclear-spin bath in the crystal. Here we detect the collective dynamics of nuclear-spin bath located around the rare-earth ions in a crystal using dynamical decoupling spectroscopy method. From the measured spectrum, we analyze the configuration of the spin bath and characterize the flip-flop time between two correlated nuclear spins in a long time scale ($\sim $1s). Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that the rare-earth ions can serve as a magnetic quantum sensor for external magnetic field. These results suggest that the rare-earth ion is a useful probe for complex spin dynamics in solids and enable quantum sensing in the low-frequency regime, revealing promising possibilities for applications in diverse fields.
  • The spin coherence time of $^{151}$Eu$^{3+}$ which substitutes the yttrium at site 1 in Y$_2$SiO$_5$ crystal has been extended to 6 hours in a recent work [\textit{Nature} \textbf{517}, 177 (2015)]. To make this long-lived spin coherence useful for optical quantum memory applications, we experimentally characterize the hyperfine interaction of the optically-excited state $^5$D$_0$ using Raman-heterodyne-detected nuclear magnetic resonance. The effective spin Hamiltonians for excited and ground state are fitted based on the experimental spectra obtained in 200 magnetic fields with various orientations. To show the correctness of the fitted parameters and potential application in quantum memory protocols, we also characterize the ground-state hyperfine interaction and predict the critical magnetic field which produces the 6-hour-long coherence time. The complete energy level structure for both the $^7$F$_0$ ground state and $^5$D$_0$ excited state at the critical magnetic field are obtained. These results enable the design of quantum memory protocols and the optimization of optical pumping strategy for realization of photonic quantum memory with hour-long lifetime.
  • By using a state of art tensor network state method, we study the ground-state phase diagram of an extended Bose-Hubbard model on the square lattice with frustrated next-nearest neighboring tunneling. In the hardcore limit, tunneling frustration stabilizes a peculiar half supersolid (HSS) phase with one sublattice being superfluid and the other sublattice being Mott Insulator away from half filling. In the softcore case, the model shows very rich phase diagrams above half filling, including three different types of supersolid phases depending on the interaction parameters. The considered model provides a promising route to experimentally search for novel stable supersolid state induced by frustrated tunneling in below half filling region with dipolar atoms or molecules.
  • The projected entangled pair states (PEPS) methods have been proved to be powerful tools to solve the strongly correlated quantum many-body problems in two-dimension. However, due to the high computational scaling with the virtual bond dimension $D$, in a practical application PEPS are often limited to rather small bond dimensions, which may not be large enough for some highly entangled systems, for instance, the frustrated systems. The optimization of the ground state using time evolution method with simple update scheme may go to a larger bond dimension. However, the accuracy of the rough approximation to the environment of the local tensors is questionable. Here, we demonstrate that combining the time evolution method with simple update, Monte Carlo sampling techniques and gradient optimization will offer an efficient method to calculate the PEPS ground state. By taking the advantages of massive parallel computing, we can study the quantum systems with larger bond dimensions up to $D$=10 without resorting to any symmetry. Benchmark tests of the method on the $J_1$-$J_2$ model give impressive accuracy compared with exact results.
  • Topological quantum computation aims to employ anyonic quasiparticles with exotic braiding statistics to encode and manipulate quantum information in a fault-tolerant way. Majorana zero modes are experimentally the simplest realisation of anyons that can non-trivially process quantum information. However, their braiding evolutions, necessary for realising topological gates, still remain beyond current technologies. Here we report the experimental encoding of four Majorana zero modes in an all-optical quantum simulator that give rise to a fault-tolerant qubit. We experimentally simulate their braiding and demonstrate both the non-Abelian character and the topological nature of the resulting geometric phase. We realise a full set of topological and non-topological gates that can arbitrarily rotate the encoded qubit. As an application, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm exclusively by topological gates. Our experiment indicates the intriguing possibility of the experimental simulation of Majorana-based quantum computation with scalable technologies.
  • We experimentally show that nonlocality can be produced from single-particle contextuality by using two-particle correlations which do not violate any Bell inequality by themselves. This demonstrates that nonlocality can come from an {\em a priori} different simpler phenomenon, and connects contextuality and nonlocality, the two critical resources for, respectively, quantum computation and secure communication. From the perspective of quantum information, our experiment constitutes a proof of principle that quantum systems can be used simultaneously for both quantum computation and secure communication.
  • The Kibble-Zurek mechanism is the paradigm to account for the nonadiabatic dynamics of a system across a continuous phase transition. Its study in the quantum regime is hindered by the requisite of ground state cooling. We report the experimental quantum simulation of critical dynamics in the transverse-field Ising model by a set of Landau-Zener crossings in pseudo-momentum space, that can be probed with high accuracy using a single trapped ion. We test the Kibble-Zurek mechanism in the quantum regime in the momentum space and find the measured scaling of excitations is in accordance with the theoretical prediction.
  • The realization of Majorana zero modes is in the centre of intense theoretical and experimental investigations. Unfortunately, their exchange that can reveal their exotic statistics needs manipulations that are still beyond our experimental capabilities. Here we take an alternative approach. Through the Jordan-Wigner transformation, the Kitaev's chain supporting two Majorana zero modes is mapped to the spin-1/2 chain. We experimentally simulated the spin system and its evolution with a photonic quantum simulator. This allows us to probe the geometric phase, which corresponds to the exchange of two Majorana zero modes positioned at the ends of a three-site chain. Finally, we demonstrate the immunity of quantum information encoded in the Majorana zero modes against local errors through the simulator. Our photonic simulator opens the way for the efficient realization and manipulation of Majorana zero modes in complex architectures.
  • Standard weak measurement (SWM) has been proved to be a useful ingredient for measuring small longitudinal phase shifts. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 033604 (2013)]. In this letter, we show that with specfic pre-coupling and postselection, destructive interference can be observed for the two conjugated variables, i.e. time and frequency, of the meter state. Using a broad band source, this conjugated destructive interference (CDI) can be observed in a regime approximately 1 attosecond, while the related spectral shift reaches hundreds of THz. This extreme sensitivity can be used to detect tiny longitudinal phase perturbation. Combined with a frequency-domain analysis, conjugated destructive interference weak measurement (CDIWM) is proved to outperform SWM by two orders of magnitude.
  • Here we present the quantum storage of three-dimensional orbital-angular-momentum photonic entanglement in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. The properties of the entanglement and the storage process are confirmed by the violation of the Bell-type inequality generalized to three dimensions after storage ($S=2.152\pm0.033$). The fidelity of the memory process is $0.993\pm0.002$, as determined through complete quantum process tomography in three dimensions. An assessment of the visibility of the stored weak coherent pulses in higher-dimensional spaces, demonstrates that the memory is highly reliable for 51 spatial modes. These results pave the way towards the construction of high-dimensional and multiplexed quantum repeaters based on solid-state devices. The multimode capacity of rare-earth-based optical processor goes beyond the temporal and the spectral degree of freedom, which might provide a useful tool for photonic information processing.
  • The ability to reach a maximally entangled state from a separable one through the use of a two-qubit unitary operator is analyzed for mixed states. This extension from the known case of pure states shows that there are at least two families of gates which are able to give maximum entangling power for all values of purity. It is notable that one of this gates coincides with a maximum discording one. We give analytical proof that such gate is indeed perfect entangler at all purities and give numerical evidence for the existence of the second one. Further, we find that there are other gates, many in fact, which are perfect entanglers for a restricted range of purities. This highlights the fact that many perfect entangler gates could in principle be found if a thorough analysis of the full parameter space is performed.
  • Fernando Galve \emph{et al.} $[Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{110}, 010501 (2013)]$ introduced discording power for a two-qubit unitary gate to evaluate its capability to produce quantum discord, and found that a $\pi/8$ gate has maximal discording power. This work analyzes the entangling power of a two-qubit unitary gate, which reflects its ability to generate quantum entanglement in another way. Based on the renowned Cartan decomposition of two-qubit unitary gates, we show that the magic power of the $\pi/8$ gate produces maximal entanglement for a general value of purities for two-qubit states.
  • An upper bound between the information gain and state reversibility of weak measurement was first developed by Y. K. Cheong and S. W. Lee [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 150402 (2012)]. Their results are valid for arbitrary d-level quantum systems. In light of the commonly used qubit system in quantum information, a sharp tradeoff relation can be obtained. In this letter, this tradeoff relation is experimentally verified with polarization encoded single photons from a quantum dot. Furthermore, a complete traversal of weak measurement operators is realized, and the mapping to the least upper bound of this tradeoff relation is obtained. Our results complement the theoretical work and provide a universal ruler for the characterization of weak measurements.
  • The Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM) captures the key physics in the non-equilibrium dynamics of second-order phase transitions, and accurately predict the density of the topological defects formed in this process. However, despite much effort, the veracity of the central prediction of KZM, i.e., the scaling of the density production and the transit rate, is still an open question. Here, we performed an experiment, based on a nine-stage optical interferometer with an overall fidelity up to 0.975$\pm$0.008, that directly supports the central prediction of KZM in quantum non-equilibrium dynamics. In addition, our work has significantly upgraded the number of stages of the optical interferometer to nine with a high fidelity, this technique can also help to push forward the linear optical quantum simulation and computation.
  • A convenient and effective way in the quantum double model to study anyons in a topological space with a tensor product structure is to create and braid anyons using ribbon operators connected to a common base site [A. Kitaev Ann.\ Phys. (N.Y.) \textbf{303}, 2 (2003)]. We show how this scheme can be simulated in a physical system by constructing long ribbon operators connected to a base site that is placed faraway. We describe how to move and braid anyons using these ribbon operators, and how to perform measurement on them. We also give the smallest scale of a system that is sufficient for proof-of-principle demonstration of our scheme.
  • We study the capacitance-coupled Josephson junction array beyond the small-coupling limit. We find that, when the scale of the system is large, its Hamiltonian can be obtained without the small-coupling approximation and the system can be used to simulate strongly frustrated one-dimensional Ising spin problems. To engineer the system Hamiltonian for an ideal theoretical model, we apply a dynamical decoupling technique to eliminate undesirable couplings in the system. Using a 6-site junction array as an example, we numerically evaluate the system to show that it exhibits important characteristics of the frustrated spin model.
  • Spin-1/2 two-legged ladders respecting inter-leg exchange symmetry and D2 spin rotation symmetry have new symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases which are different from the Haldane phase. Three of the new SPT phases are tx,ty,tz, which all have symmetry protected two-fold degenerate edge states on each end of the open boundaries. However, the edge states in different phases have different response to magnetic field. For example, the edge states in the tz phase will be split by the magnetic field along the z-direction, but not by the fields in the x- and y-directions. We give the Hamiltonian that realizes each SPT phase and demonstrate a proof-of-principle quantum simulation scheme for Hamiltonians of the t0 and tz phases based on coupled-QED-cavity ladder.
  • We use the recently developed tensor network algorithm based on infinite projected entangled pair states (iPEPS) to study the phase diagram of frustrated antiferromagnetic J1-J2 Heisenberg model on a checkerboard lattice. The simulation indicates a Neel ordered phase when J2 < 0.88J1, a plaquette valence bond solid state when 0.88 < J2/J1 < 1.11, and a stripe phase when J2 > 1.11J1, with two first-order transitions across the phase boundaries. The calculation shows the cross-dimer state proposed before is unlikely to be the ground state of the model, although such a state indeed arises as a metastable state in some parameter region.
  • We define a negative entanglement measure for separable states which shows that how much entanglement one should compensate the unentangled state at least for changing it into an entangled state. For two-qubit systems and some special classes of states in higher-dimensional systems, the explicit formula and the lower bounds for the negative entanglement measure have been presented, and it always vanishes for bipartite separable pure states. The negative entanglement measure can be used as a useful quantity to describe the entanglement dynamics and the quantum phase transition. In the transverse Ising model, the first derivatives of negative entanglement measure diverge on approaching the critical value of the quantum phase transition, although these two-site reduced density matrices have no entanglement at all. In the 1D Bose-Hubbard model, the NEM as a function of $t/U$ changes from zero to negative on approaching the critical point of quantum phase transition.
  • We provide a scheme for quantum computation in lattice systems via global but periodic manipulation, in which only effective periodic magnetic fields and global nearest neighbor interaction are required. All operations in our scheme are attainable in optical lattice or solid state systems. We also investigate universal quantum operations and quantum simulation in 2 dimensional lattice. We find global manipulations are superior in simulating some nontrivial many body Hamiltonians.
  • It is a hard and important problem to find the criterion of the set of positive-definite matrixes which can be written as reduced density operators of a multi-partite quantum state. This problem is closely related to the study of many-body quantum entanglement which is one of the focuses of current quantum information theory. We give several results on the necessary compatibility relations between a set of reduced density matrixes, including: (i) compatibility conditions for the one-party reduced density matrixes of any $N_A\times N_B$ dimensional bi-partite mixed quantum state, (ii) compatibility conditions for the one-party and two-party reduced density matrixes of any $N_A\times N_B\times N_C$ dimensional tri-partite mixed quantum state, and (iii) compatibility conditions for the one-party reduced matrixes of any $M$-partite pure quantum state with the dimension $N^{\otimes M}$.
  • It is well known that the strong subadditivity theorem is hold for classical system, but it is very difficult to prove that it is hold for quantum system. The first proof of this theorem is due to Lieb by using the Lieb's theorem. Here we use the conditions obtained in our previous work of matrix analysis method to give a new proof of this famous theorem. This new proof is very elementary, it only needs to carefully analyse the minimal value of a function. This proof also shows that the conditions obtained in our previous work are stronger than the strong subadditivity theorem.