• We report simultaneous transport and scanning microwave impedance microscopy to examine the correlation between transport quantization and filling of the bulk Landau levels in the quantum Hall regime in gated graphene devices. Surprisingly, a comparison of these measurements reveals that quantized transport typically occurs below the complete filling of bulk Landau levels, when the bulk is still conductive. This result points to a revised understanding of transport quantization when carriers are accumulated by gating. We discuss the implications on transport study of the quantum Hall effect in graphene and related topological states in other two-dimensional electron systems.
  • The realization of quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect in HgTe quantum wells (QWs) is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. The QSH edge states are predicted to allow current to flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction of QSH theory that remains to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time reversal symmetry (TRS). Here we first establish a rigorous framework for understanding the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated QSH devices. We then report unexpected edge conduction under broken TRS, using a unique cryogenic microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), on a 7.5 nm HgTe QW device with an inverted band structure. At zero magnetic field and low carrier densities, clear edge conduction is observed in the local conductivity profile of this device but not in the 5.5 nm control device whose band structure is trivial. Surprisingly, the edge conduction in the 7.5 nm device persists up to 9 T with little effect from the magnetic field. This indicates physics beyond simple QSH models, possibly associated with material- specific properties, other symmetry protection and/or electron-electron interactions.
  • Quantum systems in confined geometries are host to novel physical phenomena. Examples include quantum Hall systems in semiconductors and Dirac electrons in graphene. Interest in such systems has also been intensified by the recent discovery of a large enhancement in photoluminescence quantum efficiency and a potential route to valleytronics in atomically thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides, MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te), which are closely related to the indirect to direct bandgap transition in monolayers. Here, we report the first direct observation of the transition from indirect to direct bandgap in monolayer samples by using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy on high-quality thin films of MoSe2 with variable thickness, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The band structure measured experimentally indicates a stronger tendency of monolayer MoSe2 towards a direct bandgap, as well as a larger gap size, than theoretically predicted. Moreover, our finding of a significant spin-splitting of 180 meV at the valence band maximum of a monolayer MoSe2 film could expand its possible application to spintronic devices.
  • We demonstrate a simple network-analyzer technique to make quantitative measurements of the bias dependence of spin torque in a magnetic tunnel junction. We apply a microwave current to exert an oscillating spin torque near the ferromagnetic resonance frequency of the tunnel junction's free layer. This produces an oscillating resistance that, together with an applied direct current, generates a microwave signal that we measure with the network analyzer. An analysis of the resonant response yields the strength and direction of the spin torque at non-zero bias. We compare to measurements of the spin torque vector by time-domain spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance.
  • A pure spin current generated within a nonlocal spin valve can exert a spin transfer torque on a nanomagnet. This nonlocal torque enables new design schemes for magnetic memory devices that do not require the application of large voltages across tunnel barriers that can suffer electrical breakdown. Here we report a quantitative measurement of this nonlocal spin torque using spin-torque-driven ferromagnetic resonance. Our measurement agrees well with the prediction of an effective circuit model for spin transport. Based on this model, we suggest strategies for optimizing the strength of nonlocal torque.
  • Several experimental techniques have been introduced in recent years in attempts to measure spin transfer torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The dependence of spin torque on bias is important for understanding fundamental spin physics in magnetic devices and for applications. However, previous techniques have provided only indirect measures of the torque and their results to date for the bias dependence are qualitatively and quantitatively inconsistent. Here we demonstrate that spin torque in MTJs can be measured directly by using time-domain techniques to detect resonant magnetic precession in response to an oscillating spin torque. The technique is accurate in the high-bias regime relevant for applications, and because it detects directly small-angle linear-response magnetic dynamics caused by spin torque it is relatively immune to artifacts affecting competing techniques. At high bias we find that the spin torque vector differs markedly from the simple lowest-order Taylor series approximations commonly assumed.