• This paper studies sensor calibration in spectral estimation where the true frequencies are located on a continuous domain. We consider a uniform array of sensors that collects measurements whose spectrum is composed of a finite number of frequencies, where each sensor has an unknown calibration parameter. Our goal is to recover the spectrum and the calibration parameters simultaneously from multiple snapshots of the measurements. In the noiseless case with an infinite number of snapshots, we prove uniqueness of this problem up to certain trivial, inevitable ambiguities based on an algebraic method, as long as there are more sensors than frequencies. We then analyze the sensitivity of this algebraic technique with respect to the number of snapshots and noise. We next propose an optimization approach that makes full use of the measurements by minimizing a non-convex objective which is non-negative and continuously differentiable over all calibration parameters and Toeplitz matrices. We prove that, in the case of infinite snapshots and noiseless measurements, the objective vanishes only at equivalent solutions to the true calibration parameters and the measurement covariance matrix. The objective is minimized using Wirtinger gradient descent which is proven to converge to a critical point. We show empirically that this critical point provides a good approximation of the true calibration parameters and the underlying frequencies.
  • In traditional optical imaging systems, the spatial resolution is limited by the physics of diffraction, which acts as a low-pass filter. The information on sub-wavelength features is carried by evanescent waves, never reaching the camera, thereby posing a hard limit on resolution: the so-called diffraction limit. Modern microscopic methods enable super-resolution, by employing florescence techniques. State-of-the-art localization based fluorescence subwavelength imaging techniques such as PALM and STORM achieve sub-diffraction spatial resolution of several tens of nano-meters. However, they require tens of thousands of exposures, which limits their temporal resolution. We have recently proposed SPARCOM (sparsity based super-resolution correlation microscopy), which exploits the sparse nature of the fluorophores distribution, alongside a statistical prior of uncorrelated emissions, and showed that SPARCOM achieves spatial resolution comparable to PALM/STORM, while capturing the data hundreds of times faster. Here, we provide a detailed mathematical formulation of SPARCOM, which in turn leads to an efficient numerical implementation, suitable for large-scale problems. We further extend our method to a general framework for sparsity based super-resolution imaging, in which sparsity can be assumed in other domains such as wavelet or discrete-cosine, leading to improved reconstructions in a variety of physical settings.
  • Spectral Doppler ultrasound imaging allows visualizing blood flow by estimating its velocity distribution over time. Duplex ultrasound is a modality in which an ultrasound system is used for displaying simultaneously both B-mode images and spectral Doppler data. In B-mode imaging short wide-band pulses are used to achieve sufficient spatial resolution in the images. In contrast, for Doppler imaging, narrow-band pulses are preferred in order to attain increased spectral resolution. Thus, the acquisition time must be shared between the two sequences. In this work, we propose a non-uniform slow-time transmission scheme for spectral Doppler, based on nested arrays, which reduces the number of pulses needed for accurate spectrum recovery. We derive the minimal number of Doppler emissions needed, using this approach, for perfect reconstruction of the blood spectrum in a noise-free environment. Next, we provide two spectrum recovery techniques which achieve this minimal number. The first method performs efficient recovery based on the fast Fourier transform. The second allows for continuous recovery of the Doppler frequencies, thus avoiding off-grid error leakage, at the expense of increased complexity. The performance of the techniques is evaluated using realistic Field II simulations as well as in vivo measurements, producing accurate spectrograms of the blood velocities using a significant reduced number of transmissions. The time gained, where no Doppler pulses are sent, can be used to enable the display of both blood velocities and high quality B-mode images at a high frame rate.
  • We consider the recovery of a continuous-time Wiener process from a quantized or lossy compressed version of its uniform samples under limited bitrate and sampling rate. We derive a closed form expression for the optimal tradeoff among sampling rate, bitrate, and quadratic distortion in this setting. This expression is given in terms of a reverse waterfilling formula over the asymptotic spectral distribution of a sequence of finite-rank operators associated with the optimal estimator of the Wiener process from its samples. We show that the ratio between this expression and the standard distortion rate function of the Wiener process, describing the optimal tradeoff between bitrate and distortion without a sampling constraint, is only a function of the number of bits per sample. For example using one bit per sample on average, the expected distortion is approximately 1.2 times the standard distortion rate function, indicating a performance loss of about 20% due to sampling. We next consider the distortion when the continuous-time process is estimated from the output of an encoder that is optimal with respect to the discrete-time samples. We show that while the latter is strictly greater than the distortion under optimal encoding, the ratio between the two does not exceed 1.027. We therefore conclude that nearly optimal performance is attained even if the encoder is unaware of the sampling rate and encodes the samples without taking into account the continuous-time underlying process.
  • Ultrasound localization microscopy has enabled super-resolution vascular imaging in laboratory environments through precise localization of individual ultrasound contrast agents across numerous imaging frames. However, analysis of high-density regions with significant overlaps among the agents' point spread responses yields high localization errors, constraining the technique to low-concentration conditions. As such, long acquisition times are required to sufficiently cover the vascular bed. In this work, we present a fast and precise method for obtaining super-resolution vascular images from high-density contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging data. This method, which we term Deep Ultrasound Localization Microscopy (Deep-ULM), exploits modern deep learning strategies and employs a convolutional neural network to perform localization microscopy in dense scenarios. This end-to-end fully convolutional neural network architecture is trained effectively using on-line synthesized data, enabling robust inference in-vivo under a wide variety of imaging conditions. We show that deep learning attains super-resolution with challenging contrast-agent concentrations (microbubble densities), both in-silico as well as in-vivo, as we go from ultrasound scans of a rodent spinal cord in an experimental setting to standard clinically-acquired recordings in a human prostate. Deep-ULM achieves high quality sub-diffraction recovery, and is suitable for real-time applications, resolving about 135 high-resolution 64x64-patches per second on a standard PC. Exploiting GPU computation, this number increases to 2500 patches per second.
  • Representing a continuous-time signal by a set of samples is a classical problem in signal processing. We study this problem under the additional constraint that the samples are quantized or compressed in a lossy manner under a limited bitrate budget. To this end, we consider a combined sampling and source coding problem in which an analog stationary Gaussian signal is reconstructed from its encoded samples. These samples are obtained by a set of bounded linear functionals of the continuous-time path, with a limitation on the average number of samples obtained per unit time available in this setting. We provide a full characterization of the minimal distortion in terms of the sampling frequency, the bitrate, and the signal's spectrum. Assuming that the signal's energy is not uniformly distributed over its spectral support, we show that for each compression bitrate there exists a critical sampling frequency smaller than the Nyquist rate, such that the distortion in signal reconstruction when sampling at this frequency is minimal. Our results can be seen as an extension of the classical sampling theorem for bandlimited random processes in the sense that it describes the minimal amount of excess distortion in the reconstruction due to lossy compression of the samples, and provides the minimal sampling frequency required in order to achieve this distortion. Finally, we compare the fundamental limits in the combined source coding and sampling problem to the performance of pulse code modulation (PCM), where each sample is quantized by a scalar quantizer using a fixed number of bits.
  • Ultrasound localization microscopy offers new radiation-free diagnostic tools for vascular imaging deep within the tissue. Sequential localization of echoes returned from inert microbubbles with low-concentration within the bloodstream reveal the vasculature with capillary resolution. Despite its high spatial resolution, low microbubble concentrations dictate the acquisition of tens of thousands of images, over the course of several seconds to tens of seconds, to produce a single super-resolved image. %since each echo is required to be well separated from adjacent microbubbles. Such long acquisition times and stringent constraints on microbubble concentration are undesirable in many clinical scenarios. To address these restrictions, sparsity-based approaches have recently been developed. These methods reduce the total acquisition time dramatically, while maintaining good spatial resolution in settings with considerable microbubble overlap. %Yet, non of the reported methods exploit the fact that microbubbles actually flow within the bloodstream. % to improve recovery. Here, we further improve sparsity-based super-resolution ultrasound imaging by exploiting the inherent flow of microbubbles and utilize their motion kinematics. While doing so, we also provide quantitative measurements of microbubble velocities. Our method relies on simultaneous tracking and super-localization of individual microbubbles in a frame-by-frame manner, and as such, may be suitable for real-time implementation. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach on both simulations and {\it in-vivo} contrast enhanced human prostate scans, acquired with a clinically approved scanner.
  • Phase retrieval refers to recovering a signal from its Fourier magnitude. This problem arises naturally in many scientific applications, such as ultra-short laser pulse characterization and diffraction imaging. Unfortunately, phase retrieval is ill-posed for almost all one-dimensional signals. In order to characterize a laser pulse and overcome the ill-posedness, it is common to use a technique called Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG). In FROG, the measured data, referred to as FROG trace, is the Fourier magnitude of the product of the underlying signal with several translated versions of itself. The FROG trace results in a system of phaseless quartic Fourier measurements. In this paper, we prove that it suffices to consider only three translations of the signal to determine almost all bandlimited signals, up to trivial ambiguities. In practice, one usually also has access to the signal's Fourier magnitude. We show that in this case only two translations suffice. Our results significantly improve upon earlier work.
  • We propose a stable and fast reconstruction technique for parallel-beam (PB) tomographic X-ray imaging, relying on the discrete pseudo-polar (PP) Radon transform. Our main contribution is a resampling method, based on modern sampling theory, that transforms the acquired PB measurements to a PP grid. The resampling process is both fast and accurate, and in addition, simultaneously denoises the measurements, by exploiting geometrical properties of the tomographic scan. The transformed measurements are then reconstructed using an iterative solver with total variation (TV) regularization. We show that reconstructing from measurements on the PP grid, leads to improved recovery, due to the inherent stability and accuracy of the PP Radon transform, compared with the PB Radon transform. We also demonstrate recovery from a reduced number of PB acquisition angles, and high noise levels. Our approach is shown to achieve superior results over other state-of-the-art solutions, that operate directly on the given PB measurements. The proposed method can benefit fan-beam and/or cone-beam projections by coupling it with a rebinning process.
  • In the past few years, new approaches to radar signal processing have been introduced which allow the radar to perform signal detection and parameter estimation from much fewer measurements than that required by Nyquist sampling. These systems - referred to as sub-Nyquist radars - model the received signal as having finite rate of innovation and employ the Xampling framework to obtain low-rate samples of the signal. Sub-Nyquist radars exploit the fact that the target scene is sparse facilitating the use of compressed sensing (CS) methods in signal recovery. In this chapter, we review several pulse-Doppler radar systems based on these principles. Contrary to other CS-based designs, our formulations directly address the reduced-rate analog sampling in space and time, avoid a prohibitive dictionary size, and are robust to noise and clutter. We begin by introducing temporal sub-Nyquist processing for estimating the target locations using less bandwidth than conventional systems. This paves the way to cognitive radars which share their transmit spectrum with other communication services, thereby providing a robust solution for coexistence in spectrally crowded environments. Next, without impairing Doppler resolution, we reduce the dwell time by transmitting interleaved radar pulses in a scarce manner within a coherent processing interval or "slow time". Then, we consider multiple-input-multiple-output array radars and demonstrate spatial sub-Nyquist processing which allows the use of few antenna elements without degradation in angular resolution. Finally, we demonstrate application of sub-Nyquist and cognitive radars to imaging systems such as synthetic aperture radar. For each setting, we present a state-of-the-art hardware prototype designed to demonstrate the real-time feasibility of sub-Nyquist radars.
  • Direction of arrival (DoA) estimation of targets improves with the number of elements employed by a phased array radar antenna. Since larger arrays have high associated cost, area and computational load, there is recent interest in thinning the antenna arrays without loss of far-field DoA accuracy. In this context, a cognitive radar may deploy a full array and then select an optimal subarray to transmit and receive the signals in response to changes in the target environment. Prior works have used optimization and greedy search methods to pick the best subarrays cognitively. In this paper, we leverage deep learning to address the antenna selection problem. Specifically, we construct a convolutional neural network (CNN) as a multi-class classification framework where each class designates a different subarray. The proposed network determines a new array every time data is received by the radar, thereby making antenna selection a cognitive operation. Our numerical experiments show that the proposed CNN structure outperforms existing random thinning and other machine learning approaches.
  • Solving inverse problems with iterative algorithms is popular, especially for large data. Due to time constraints, the number of possible iterations is usually limited, potentially affecting the achievable accuracy. Given an error one is willing to tolerate, an important question is whether it is possible to modify the original iterations to obtain faster convergence to a minimizer achieving the allowed error without increasing the computational cost of each iteration considerably. Relying on recent recovery techniques developed for settings in which the desired signal belongs to some low-dimensional set, we show that using a coarse estimate of this set may lead to faster convergence at the cost of an additional reconstruction error related to the accuracy of the set approximation. Our theory ties to recent advances in sparse recovery, compressed sensing, and deep learning. Particularly, it may provide a possible explanation to the successful approximation of the l1-minimization solution by neural networks with layers representing iterations, as practiced in the learned iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (LISTA).
  • Massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems have been drawing considerable interest due to the growing throughput demands on wireless networks. In the uplink, massive MIMO systems are commonly studied assuming that each base station (BS) decodes the signals of its user terminals separately and linearly while treating all interference as noise. Although this approach provides improved spectral efficiency which scales with the number of BS antennas in favorable channel conditions, it is generally sub-optimal from an information-theoretic perspective. In this work we characterize the spectral efficiency of massive MIMO when the BSs are allowed to jointly decode the received signals. In particular, we consider four schemes for treating the interference, and derive the achievable average ergodic rates for both finite and asymptotic number of antennas for each scheme. Simulation tests of the proposed methods illustrate their gains in spectral efficiency compared to the standard approach of separate linear decoding, and show that the standard approach fails to capture the actual achievable rates of massive MIMO systems, particularly when the interference is dominant.
  • Processing, storing and communicating information that originates as an analog signal involves conversion of this information to bits. This conversion can be described by the combined effect of sampling and quantization, as illustrated in Fig. 1. The digital representation is achieved by first sampling the analog signal so as to represent it by a set of discrete-time samples and then quantizing these samples to a finite number of bits. Traditionally, these two operations are considered separately. The sampler is designed to minimize information loss due to sampling based on characteristics of the continuous-time input. The quantizer is designed to represent the samples as accurately as possible, subject to a constraint on the number of bits that can be used in the representation. The goal of this article is to revisit this paradigm by illuminating the dependency between these two operations. In particular, we explore the requirements on the sampling system subject to constraints on the available number of bits for storing, communicating or processing the analog information.
  • Massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) communication is a promising technology for increasing spectral efficiency in wireless networks. Two of the main challenges massive MIMO systems face are degraded channel estimation accuracy due to pilot contamination and increase in computational load and hardware complexity due to the massive amount of antennas. In this paper, we focus on the problem of channel estimation in massive MIMO systems, while addressing these two challenges: We jointly design the pilot sequences to mitigate the effect of pilot contamination and propose an analog combiner which maps the high number of sensors to a low number of RF chains, thus reducing the computational and hardware cost. We consider a statistical model in which the channel covariance obeys a Kronecker structure. In particular, we treat two such cases, corresponding to fully- and partially-separable correlations. We prove that with these models, the analog combiner design can be done independently of the pilot sequences. Given the resulting combiner, we derive a closed-form expression for the optimal pilot sequences in the fully-separable case and suggest a greedy sum of ratio traces maximization (GSRTM) method for designing sub-optimal pilots in the partially-separable scenario. We demonstrate via simulations that our pilot design framework achieves lower mean squared error than the common pilot allocation framework previously considered for pilot contamination mitigation.
  • In phase retrieval problems, a signal of interest (SOI) is reconstructed based on the magnitude of a linear transformation of the SOI observed with additive noise. The linear transform is typically referred to as a measurement matrix. Many works on phase retrieval assume that the measurement matrix is a random Gaussian matrix, which, in the noiseless scenario with sufficiently many measurements, guarantees invertability of the transformation between the SOI and the observations, up to an inherent phase ambiguity. However, in many practical applications, the measurement matrix corresponds to an underlying physical setup, and is therefore deterministic, possibly with structural constraints. In this work we study the design of deterministic measurement matrices, based on maximizing the mutual information between the SOI and the observations. We characterize necessary conditions for the optimality of a measurement matrix, and analytically obtain the optimal matrix in the low signal-to-noise ratio regime. Practical methods for designing general measurement matrices and masked Fourier measurements are proposed. Simulation tests demonstrate the performance gain achieved by the proposed techniques compared to random Gaussian measurements for various phase recovery algorithms.
  • The scanning electron microscope (SEM) produces an image of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the atoms in the sample, which emit secondary electrons that contain information about the surface topography and composition. The sample is scanned by the electron beam point by point, until an image of the surface is formed. Since its invention in 1942, SEMs have become paramount in the discovery and understanding of the nanometer world, and today it is extensively used for both research and in industry. In principle, SEMs can achieve resolution better than one nanometer. However, for many applications, working at sub-nanometer resolution implies an exceedingly large number of scanning points. For exactly this reason, the SEM diagnostics of microelectronic chips is performed either at high resolution (HR) over a small area or at low resolution (LR) while capturing a larger portion of the chip. Here, we employ sparse coding and dictionary learning to algorithmically enhance LR SEM images of microelectronic chips up to the level of the HR images acquired by slow SEM scans, while considerably reducing the noise. Our methodology consists of two steps: an offline stage of learning a joint dictionary from a sequence of LR and HR images of the same region in the chip, followed by a fast-online super-resolution step where the resolution of a new LR image is enhanced. We provide several examples with typical chips used in the microelectronics industry, as well as a statistical study on arbitrary images with characteristic structural features. Conceptually, our method works well when the images have similar characteristics. This work demonstrates that employing sparsity concepts can greatly improve the performance of SEM, thereby considerably increasing the scanning throughput without compromising on analysis quality and resolution.
  • Most of compressed sensing (CS) theory to date is focused on incoherent sensing, that is, columns from the sensing matrix are highly uncorrelated. However, sensing systems with naturally occurring correlations arise in many applications, such as signal detection, motion detection and radar. Moreover, in these applications it is often not necessary to know the support of the signal exactly, but instead small errors in the support and signal are tolerable. Despite the abundance of work utilizing incoherent sensing matrices, for this type of tolerant recovery we suggest that coherence is actually beneficial. We promote the use of coherent sampling when tolerant support recovery is acceptable, and demonstrate its advantages empirically. In addition, we provide a first step towards theoretical analysis by considering a specific reconstruction method for selected signal classes.
  • Purpose: In many clinical MRI scenarios, existing imaging information can be used to significantly shorten acquisition time or to improve Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). In this paper the authors present a framework for fast MRI by exploiting a reference image (FASTMER). Methods: The proposed approach utilizes the possible similarity of the reference image that exists in many clinical MRI imaging scenarios. Such scenarios include similarity between adjacent slices in high resolution MRI, similarity between various contrasts in the same scan and similarity between different scans of the same patient. The authors take into account that the reference image may exhibit low similarity with the acquired image and develop an iterative weighted approach for reconstruction, which tunes the weights according to the degree of similarity. Results: Experimental results demonstrate the performance of the method in three different clinical MRI scenarios: SNR improvement in high resolution brain MRI, exploiting similarity between T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) for fast FLAIR scanning and utilizing similarity between baseline and follow-up scans for fast follow-up. Results outperform reconstruction results of existing state-of-the-art methods. Conclusions: The authors present a method for fast MRI by exploiting a reference image. The method is based on an iterative reconstruction approach that supports cases in which similarity to the reference scan is not guaranteed, which enables the applicability of the method to a variety of MRI applications. Thanks to the existence of reference images in various clinical imaging scenarios, the proposed framework can play a major part in improving reconstruction in many MR applications.
  • Purpose: Repeated brain MRI scans are performed in many clinical scenarios, such as follow up of patients with tumors and therapy response assessment. In this paper, the authors show an approach to utilize former scans of the patient for the acceleration of repeated MRI scans. Methods: The proposed approach utilizes the possible similarity of the repeated scans in longitudinal MRI studies. Since similarity is not guaranteed, sampling and reconstruction are adjusted during acquisition to match the actual similarity between the scans. The baseline MR scan is utilized both in the sampling stage, via adaptive sampling, and in the reconstruction stage, with weighted reconstruction. In adaptive sampling, k-space sampling locations are optimized during acquisition. Weighted reconstruction uses the locations of the nonzero coefficients in the sparse domains as a prior in the recovery process. The approach was tested on 2D and 3D MRI scans of patients with brain tumors. Results: The longitudinal adaptive CS MRI (LACS-MRI) scheme provides reconstruction quality which outperforms other CS-based approaches for rapid MRI. Examples are shown on patients with brain tumors and demonstrate improved spatial resolution. Compared with data sampled at Nyquist rate, LACS-MRI exhibits Signal-to-Error Ratio (SER) of 24.8dB with undersampling factor of 16.6 in 3D MRI. Conclusions: The authors have presented a novel method for image reconstruction utilizing similarity of scans in longitudinal MRI studies, where possible. The proposed approach can play a major part and significantly reduce scanning time in many applications that consist of disease follow-up and monitoring of longitudinal changes in brain MRI.
  • This paper presents a new algorithm, termed \emph{truncated amplitude flow} (TAF), to recover an unknown vector $\bm{x}$ from a system of quadratic equations of the form $y_i=|\langle\bm{a}_i,\bm{x}\rangle|^2$, where $\bm{a}_i$'s are given random measurement vectors. This problem is known to be \emph{NP-hard} in general. We prove that as soon as the number of equations is on the order of the number of unknowns, TAF recovers the solution exactly (up to a global unimodular constant) with high probability and complexity growing linearly with both the number of unknowns and the number of equations. Our TAF approach adopts the \emph{amplitude-based} empirical loss function, and proceeds in two stages. In the first stage, we introduce an \emph{orthogonality-promoting} initialization that can be obtained with a few power iterations. Stage two refines the initial estimate by successive updates of scalable \emph{truncated generalized gradient iterations}, which are able to handle the rather challenging nonconvex and nonsmooth amplitude-based objective function. In particular, when vectors $\bm{x}$ and $\bm{a}_i$'s are real-valued, our gradient truncation rule provably eliminates erroneously estimated signs with high probability to markedly improve upon its untruncated version. Numerical tests using synthetic data and real images demonstrate that our initialization returns more accurate and robust estimates relative to spectral initializations. Furthermore, even under the same initialization, the proposed amplitude-based refinement outperforms existing Wirtinger flow variants, corroborating the superior performance of TAF over state-of-the-art algorithms.
  • The proliferation of wireless communications has recently created a bottleneck in terms of spectrum availability. Motivated by the observation that the root of the spectrum scarcity is not a lack of resources but an inefficient managing that can be solved, dynamic opportunistic exploitation of spectral bands has been considered, under the name of Cognitive Radio (CR). This technology allows secondary users to access currently idle spectral bands by detecting and tracking the spectrum occupancy. The CR application revisits this traditional task with specific and severe requirements in terms of spectrum sensing and detection performance, real-time processing, robustness to noise and more. Unfortunately, conventional methods do not satisfy these demands for typical signals, that often have very high Nyquist rates. Recently, several sampling methods have been proposed that exploit signals' a priori known structure to sample them below the Nyquist rate. Here, we review some of these techniques and tie them to the task of spectrum sensing in the context of CR. We then show how issues related to spectrum sensing can be tackled in the sub-Nyquist regime. First, to cope with low signal to noise ratios, we propose to recover second-order statistics from the low rate samples, rather than the signal itself. In particular, we consider cyclostationary based detection, and investigate CR networks that perform collaborative spectrum sensing to overcome channel effects. To enhance the efficiency of the available spectral bands detection, we present joint spectrum sensing and direction of arrival estimation methods. Throughout this work, we highlight the relation between theoretical algorithms and their practical implementation. We show hardware simulations performed on a prototype we built, demonstrating the feasibility of sub-Nyquist spectrum sensing in the context of CR.
  • Nowadays, millimeter-wave communication centered at the 60 GHz radio frequency band is increasingly the preferred technology for near-field communication since it provides transmission bandwidth that is several GHz wide. The IEEE 802.11ad standard has been developed for commercial wireless local area networks in the 60 GHz transmission environment. Receivers designed to process IEEE 802.11ad waveforms employ very high rate analog-to-digital converters, and therefore, reducing the receiver sampling rate can be useful. In this work, we study the problem of low-rate channel estimation over the IEEE 802.11ad 60 GHz communication link by harnessing sparsity in the channel impulse response. In particular, we focus on single carrier modulation and exploit the special structure of the 802.11ad waveform embedded in the channel estimation field of its single carrier physical layer frame. We examine various sub-Nyquist sampling methods for this problem and recover the channel using compressed sensing techniques. Our numerical experiments show feasibility of our procedures up to one-seventh of the Nyquist rates with minimal performance deterioration.
  • The problem of recovering a one-dimensional signal from its Fourier transform magnitude, called Fourier phase retrieval, is ill-posed in most cases. We consider the closely-related problem of recovering a signal from its phaseless short-time Fourier transform (STFT) measurements. This problem arises naturally in several applications, such as ultra-short laser pulse characterization and ptychography. The redundancy offered by the STFT enables unique recovery under mild conditions. We show that in some cases the unique solution can be obtained by the principal eigenvector of a matrix, constructed as the solution of a simple least-squares problem. When these conditions are not met, we suggest using the principal eigenvector of this matrix to initialize non-convex local optimization algorithms and propose two such methods. The first is based on minimizing the empirical risk loss function, while the second maximizes a quadratic function on the manifold of phases. We prove that under appropriate conditions, the proposed initialization is close to the underlying signal. We then analyze the geometry of the empirical risk loss function and show numerically that both gradient algorithms converge to the underlying signal even with small redundancy in the measurements. In addition, the algorithms are robust to noise.
  • The capacity of a discrete-time multi-input multi-output (MIMO) Gaussian channel with output quantization is investigated for different receiver architectures. A general formulation of this problem is proposed in which the antenna outputs are processed by analog combiners while sign quantizers are used for analog-to-digital conversion. To exemplify this approach, four analog receiver architectures of varying generality and complexity are considered: (a) multiple antenna selection and sign quantization of the antenna outputs, (b) single antenna selection and multilevel quantization, (c) multiple antenna selection and multilevel quantization, and (d) linear combining of the antenna outputs and multilevel quantization. Achievable rates are studied as a function of the number of available sign quantizers and compared among different architectures. In particular, it is shown that architecture (a) is sufficient to attain the optimal high signal-to-noise ratio performance for a MIMO receiver in which the number of antennas is larger than the number of sign quantizers. Numerical evaluations of the average performance are presented for the case in which the channel gains are i.i.d. Gaussian.