• We investigate Lya, [OIII]5007, Ha, and [CII]158um emission from 1124 galaxies at z=4.9-7.0. Our sample is composed of 1092 Lya emitters (LAEs) at z=4.9, 5.7, 6.6, and 7.0 identified by Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) narrowband surveys covered by Spitzer large area survey with Subaru/HSC (SPLASH) and 34 galaxies at z=5.148-7.508 with deep ALMA [CII]158um data in the literature. Fluxes of strong rest-frame optical lines of [OIII] and Ha (Hb) are constrained by significant excesses found in the SPLASH 3.6 and 4.5um photometry. At z=4.9, we find that the rest-frame Ha equivalent width and the Lya escape fraction f_Lya positively correlate with the rest-frame Lya equivalent width EW^0_Lya. The f_Lya-EW^0_Lya correlation is similarly found at z~0-2, suggesting no evolution of the correlation over z~0-5. The typical ionizing photon production efficiency of LAEs is logxi_ion/[Hz erg^-1]~25.5 significantly (60-100%) higher than those of LBGs at a given UV magnitude. At z=5.7-7.0, there exists an interesting turn-over trend that the [OIII]/Ha flux ratio increases in EW^0_Lya~0-30 A, and then decreases out to EW^0_Lya~130 A. We also identify an anti-correlation between a [CII] luminosity to star-formation rate ratio (L_[CII]/SFR) and EW^0_Lya at the >99% confidence level. We carefully investigate physical origins of the correlations with stellar-synthesis and photoionization models, and find that a simple anti-correlation between EW_Lya^0 and metallicity explains self-consistently all of the correlations of Lya, Ha, [OIII]/Ha, and [CII] identified in our study, indicating detections of metal-poor (~0.03 Zo) galaxies with EW^0_Lya~200 A.
  • We report the result of optical identifications of FIRST radio sources with the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program survey (HSC-SSP). The positional cross-match within 1" between the FIRST and HSC-SSP catalogs (i ~< 26) produced more than 3600 optical counterparts in the 156 deg^2 of the HSC-SSP field. The matched counterparts account for more than 50 % of the FIRST sources in the search field, which substantially exceeds previously reported fractions of SDSS counterparts (i ~< 22) of ~ 30 %. Among the matched sample, 9 % are optically unresolved sources such as radio-loud quasars. The optically faint (i > 21) radio galaxies (RGs) show a flatter slope of a fitting linear function of the 1.4 GHz source counts than the bright RGs, while optically faint radio quasars show a steeper slope than the bright radio quasars. The optically faint RGs shows a flat slope in the i-band number counts down to 24 mag, implying either less-massive or distant radio-AGNs beyond 24 mag. The photometric redshift and the comparison of colors with the galaxy models show that most of the matched RGs are distributed at redshifts from 0 to 1.5. The optically faint sample includes the high radio-loudness sources that are not seen in the optically bright sample. Such sources are located at a redshift of larger than 1. This study provides a large number of radio-AGNs lying at the optically faint end and high redshift regime that are not probed by the previous searches.
  • We report optical properties of infrared (IR)-bright dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) that are defined as (i-[22])_AB > 7.0. Since supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in IR-bright DOGs are expected to be rapidly growing in the major merger scenario, they provide useful clues to understand the co-evolution of SMBHs and their host galaxies. However the optical properties of IR-bright DOGs are still unclear, because the optical emission of DOGs is very faint. By combining ~ 53 deg^2 images of the optical, near-IR, and mid-IR data that are obtained with the Subaru Hyper Suprime Cam (HSC) survey, VISTA VIKING survey, and WISE all-sky survey, respectively, 427 IR-bright DOGs are selected. We find that IR-bright DOGs show a redder (g-z)_AB color than other populations of dusty galaxies such as ultra-luminous IR galaxies (ULIRGs) at a similar redshift, with a significantly large dispersion. Among the selected DOGs, star-formation (SF)-dominated DOGs show a relatively red color while active galactic nucleus (AGN)-dominated DOGs show a rather blue color in optical. This result is consistent with the idea that the relative AGN contribution in the optical emission becomes more significant at a late stage in the major merger scenario. Roughly 2% of AGN-dominated DOGs show a significant blue excess in blue HSC bands (BluDOGs), which can be interpreted as a leaked AGN emission as proposed for some blue-excess Hot DOGs in earlier works.
  • Narrow-line regions excited by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are important for studying AGN photoionization and feedback. Their strong [O III] lines can be detected with broadband images, allowing morphological studies of these systems with large-area imaging surveys. We develop a new technique to reconstruct the [O III] images using the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Survey aided with spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The technique involves a careful subtraction of the galactic continuum to isolate emission from the [O III]$\lambda$5007 and [O III]$\lambda$4959 lines. Compared to traditional targeted observations, this technique is more efficient at covering larger samples with less dedicated observational resources. We apply this technique to an SDSS spectroscopically selected sample of 300 obscured AGN at redshifts 0.1 - 0.7, uncovering extended emission-line region candidates with sizes up to tens of kpc. With the largest sample of uniformly derived narrow-line region sizes, we revisit the narrow-line region size-luminosity relation. The area and radii of the [O III] emission-line regions are strongly correlated with the AGN luminosity inferred from the mid-infrared (15 $\mu$m rest-frame) with a power-law slope of $0.62^{+0.05}_{-0.06} \pm 0.10$ (statistical and systemic errors), consistent with previous spectroscopic findings. We discuss the implications for the physics of AGN emission-line region and future applications of this technique, which should be useful for current and next-generation imaging surveys to study AGN photoionization and feedback with large statistical samples.
  • We present measurements of the mean and scatter of the IGM Lyman-{\alpha} opacity at 4.9 < z < 6.1 along the lines of sight of 62 quasars at z > 5.7, the largest sample assembled at these redshifts to date by a factor of two. The sample size enables us to sample cosmic variance at these redshifts more robustly than ever before. The spectra used here were obtained by the SDSS, DES-VHS and SHELLQs collaborations, drawn from the ESI and X-Shooter archives, reused from previous studies or observed specifically for this work. We measure the effective optical depth of Lyman-{\alpha} in bins of 10, 30, 50 and 70 cMpc h-1, construct cumulative distribution functions under two treatments of upper limits on flux and explore an empirical analytic fit to residual Lyman-{\alpha} transmission. We verify the consistency of our results with those of previous studies via bootstrap re-sampling and confirm the existence of tails towards high values in the opacity distributions, which may persist down to z = 5.2. Comparing our results with predictions from cosmological simulations, we find further strong evidence against models that include a spatially uniform ionizing background and temperature-density relation. We also compare to IGM models that include either a fluctuating UVB dominated by rare quasars or temperature fluctuations due to patchy reionization. Although both models produce better agreement with the observations, neither fully captures the observed scatter in IGM opacity. Our sample of 62 z > 5.7 quasar spectra opens many avenues for future study of the reionisation epoch.
  • We present our ALMA Cycle 4 measurements of the [CII] emission line and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) continuum emission from four optically low-luminosity ($M_{\rm 1450} > -25$) quasars at $z \gtrsim 6$ discovered by the Subaru Hyper Suprime Cam (HSC) survey. The [CII] line and FIR continuum luminosities lie in the ranges $L_{\rm [CII]} = (3.8-10.2) \times 10^8~L_\odot$ and $L_{\rm FIR} = (1.2-2.0) \times 10^{11}~L_\odot$, which are at least one order of magnitude smaller than those of optically-luminous quasars at $z \gtrsim 6$. We estimate the star formation rates (SFR) of our targets as $\simeq 23-40~M_\odot ~{\rm yr}^{-1}$. Their line and continuum-emitting regions are marginally resolved, and found to be comparable in size to those of optically luminous quasars, indicating that their SFR or likely gas mass surface densities (key controlling parameter of mass accretion) are accordingly different. The $L_{\rm [CII]}/L_{\rm FIR}$ ratios of the hosts, $\simeq (2.2-8.7) \times 10^{-3}$, are fully consistent with local star-forming galaxies. Using the [CII] dynamics, we derived their dynamical masses within a radius of 1.5-2.5 kpc as $\simeq (1.4-8.2) \times 10^{10}~M_\odot$. By interpreting these masses as stellar ones, we suggest that these faint quasar hosts are on or even below the star-forming main sequence at $z \sim 6$, i.e., they appear to be transforming into quiescent galaxies. This is in contrast to the optically luminous quasars at those redshifts, which show starburst-like properties. Finally, we find that the ratios of black hole mass to host galaxy dynamical mass of the most of low-luminosity quasars including the HSC ones are consistent with the local value. The mass ratios of the HSC quasars can be reproduced by a semi-analytical model that assumes merger-induced black hole-host galaxy evolution.
  • Collisions and interactions between gas-rich galaxies are thought to be pivotal stages in their formation and evolution, causing the rapid production of new stars, and possibly serving as a mechanism for fueling supermassive black holes (BH). Harnessing the exquisite spatial resolution (~0.5 arcsec) afforded by the first ~170 deg^2 of the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Survey, we present our new constraints on the importance of galaxy-galaxy major mergers (1:4) in growing BHs throughout the last ~8 Gyrs. Utilizing mid-infrared observations in the WISE All-Sky survey, we robustly select active galactic nuclei (AGN) and mass-matched control galaxy samples, totaling ~140,000 spectroscopically confirmed systems at i<22 mag. We identify galaxy interaction signatures using a novel machine-learning random forest decision tree technique allowing us to select statistically significant samples of major-mergers, minor-mergers/irregular-systems, and non-interacting galaxies. We use these samples to show that galaxies undergoing mergers are a factor ~2-7 more likely to contain luminous obscured AGN than non-interacting galaxies, and this is independent of both stellar mass and redshift to z < 0.9. Furthermore, based on our comparison of AGN fractions in mass-matched samples, we determine that the most luminous AGN population (L_AGN > 10^45 erg/s) systematically reside in merging systems over non-interacting galaxies. Our findings show that galaxy-galaxy interactions do, on average, trigger luminous AGN activity substantially more often than in secularly evolving non-interacting galaxies, and we further suggest that the BH growth rate may be closely tied to the dynamical time of the merger system.
  • We constrain the quasar contribution to cosmic reionization based on our deep optical survey of z~6 quasars down to z_R=24.15 using Subaru/Suprime-Cam in three UKIDSS-DXS fields covering 6.5 deg^2. In Kashikawa et al. (2015), we select 17 quasar candidates and report our initial discovery of two low-luminosity quasars (M_1450~ -23) from seven targets, one of which might be a Lyman alpha emitting galaxy. From an additional optical spectroscopy, none of the four candidates out of the remaining ten turn out to be genuine quasars. Moreover, the deeper optical photometry provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) shows that, unlike the two already-known quasars, the i-z and z-y colors of the last six candidates are consistent with M- or L-type brown dwarfs. Therefore, the quasar luminosity function (QLF) in the previous paper is confirmed. Compiling QLF measurements from the literature over a wide magnitude range, including an extremely faint AGN candidate from Parsa et al. (2017}, to fit them with a double power-law, we find that the best-fit faint-end slope is alpha=-2.04^+0.33_-0.18 (-1.98^+0.48_-0.21) and characteristic magnitude is M_1450^*=-25.8^+1.1_-1.9 (-25.7^+1.0_-1.8) in the case of two (one) quasar detection. Our result suggests that, if the QLF is integrated down to M_1450=-18, quasars produce ~1-12% of the ionizing photons required to ionize the whole universe at z~6 with 2sigma confidence level, assuming that the escape fraction is f_esc=1 and the IGM clumpy factor is C=3. Even when the systematic uncertainties are taken into account, our result supports the scenario that quasars are the minor contributors of reionization.
  • We study the UV luminosity functions (LFs) at $z\sim 4$, $5$, $6,$ and $7$ based on the deep large-area optical images taken by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru strategic program (SSP). On the 100 deg$^2$ sky of the HSC SSP data available to date, we make enormous samples consisting of a total of 579,565 dropout candidates at $z\sim 4-7$ by the standard color selection technique, 358 out of which are spectroscopically confirmed by our follow-up spectroscopy and other studies. We obtain UV LFs at $z \sim 4-7$ that span a very wide UV luminosity range of $\sim 0.002 - 100 \, L_{\rm UV}^\ast$ ($-26 < M_{\rm UV} < -14$ mag) by combining LFs from our program and the ultra-deep Hubble Space Telescope legacy surveys. We derive three parameters of the best-fit Schechter function, $\phi^\ast$, $M_{\rm UV}^\ast$, and $\alpha$, of the UV LFs in the magnitude range where the AGN contribution is negligible, and find that $\alpha$ and $\phi^\ast$ decrease from $z\sim 4$ to $7$ with no significant evolution of $M_{\rm UV}^\ast$. Because our HSC SSP data bridge the LFs of galaxies and AGNs with great statistical accuracy, we carefully investigate the bright end of the galaxy UV LFs that are estimated by the subtraction of the AGN contribution either aided with spectroscopy or the best-fit AGN UV LFs. We find that the bright end of the galaxy UV LFs cannot be explained by the Schechter function fits at $> 2 \sigma$ significance, and require either double power-law functions or modified Schechter functions that consider a magnification bias due to gravitational lensing.
  • We investigate the galaxy overdensity around proto-cluster scale quasar pairs at high (z>3) and low (z~1) redshift based on the unprecedentedly wide and deep optical survey of the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). Using the first-year survey data covering effectively ~121 deg^2 with the 5sigma depth of i~26.4 and the SDSS DR12Q catalog, we find two luminous pairs at z~3.3 and 3.6 which reside in >5sigma overdense regions of g-dropout galaxies at i<25. The projected separations of the two pairs are R_perp=1.75 and 1.04 proper Mpc, and their velocity offsets are Delta V=692 and 1448 km s^{-1}, respectively. This result is in clear contrast to the average z~4 quasar environments as discussed in Uchiyama et al. (2017) and implies that the quasar activities of the pair members are triggered via major mergers in proto-clusters, unlike the vast majority of isolated quasars in general fields that may turn on via non-merger events such as bar and disk instabilities. At z~1, we find 37 pairs with R_perp<2 pMpc and Delta V<2300 km s^{-1} in the current HSC-Wide coverage, including four from Hennawi et al. (2006). The distribution of the peak overdensity significance within two arcminutes around the pairs has a long tail toward high density (>4sigma) regions. Thanks to the large sample size, we find a statistical evidence that this excess is unique to the pair environments when compared to single quasar and randomly selected galaxy environments at the same redshift range. Moreover, there are nine small-scale (R_perp<1 pMpc) pairs, two of which are found to reside in cluster fields. Our results demonstrate that <2 pMpc-scale quasar pairs at both redshift range tend to occur in massive haloes, although perhaps not the most massive ones, and that they are useful to search for rare density peaks.
  • Hiroaki Aihara, Robert Armstrong, Steven Bickerton, James Bosch, Jean Coupon, Hisanori Furusawa, Yusuke Hayashi, Hiroyuki Ikeda, Yukiko Kamata, Hiroshi Karoji, Satoshi Kawanomoto, Michitaro Koike, Yutaka Komiyama, Robert H. Lupton, Sogo Mineo, Hironao Miyatake, Satoshi Miyazaki, Tomoki Morokuma, Yoshiyuki Obuchi, Yukie Oishi, Yuki Okura, Paul A. Price, Tadafumi Takata, Manobu M. Tanaka, Masayuki Tanaka, Yoko Tanaka, Tomohisa Uchida, Fumihiro Uraguchi, Yousuke Utsumi, Shiang-Yu Wang, Yoshihiko Yamada, Hitomi Yamanoi, Naoki Yasuda, Nobuo Arimoto, Masashi Chiba, Francois Finet, Hiroki Fujimori, Seiji Fujimoto, Junko Furusawa, Tomotsugu Goto, Andy Goulding, James E. Gunn, Yuichi Harikane, Takashi Hattori, Masao Hayashi, Krzysztof G. Helminiak, Ryo Higuchi, Chiaki Hikage, Paul T.P. Ho, Bau-Ching Hsieh, Kuiyun Huang, Song Huang, Masatoshi Imanishi, Ikuru Iwata, Anton T. Jaelani, Hung-Yu Jian, Nobunari Kashikawa, Nobuhiko Katayama, Takashi Kojima, Akira Konno, Shintaro Koshida, Haruka Kusakabe, Alexie Leauthaud, C.-H. Lee, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Rachel Mandelbaum, Yoshiki Matsuoka, Elinor Medezinski, Shoken Miyama, Rieko Momose, Anupreeta More, Surhud More, Shiro Mukae, Ryoma Murata, Hitoshi Murayama, Tohru Nagao, Fumiaki Nakata, Hiroko Niikura, Atsushi J. Nishizawa, Masamune Oguri, Nobuhiro Okabe, Yoshiaki Ono, Masato Onodera, Masafusa Onoue, Masami Ouchi, Tae-Soo Pyo, Takatoshi Shibuya, Kazuhiro Shimasaku, Melanie Simet, Joshua Speagle, David N. Spergel, Michael A. Strauss, Yuma Sugahara, Naoshi Sugiyama, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tsuyoshi Terai, Yoshiki Toba, Edwin L. Turner, Hisakazu Uchiyama, Keiichi Umetsu, Yuji Urata, Tomonori Usuda, Sherry Yeh, Suraphong Yuma
    The Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) is a three-layered imaging survey aimed at addressing some of the most outstanding questions in astronomy today, including the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The survey has been awarded 300 nights of observing time at the Subaru Telescope and it started in March 2014. This paper presents the first public data release of HSC-SSP. This release includes data taken in the first 1.7 years of observations (61.5 nights) and each of the Wide, Deep, and UltraDeep layers covers about 108, 26, and 4 square degrees down to depths of i~26.4, ~26.5, and ~27.0 mag, respectively (5sigma for point sources). All the layers are observed in five broad bands (grizy), and the Deep and UltraDeep layers are observed in narrow bands as well. We achieve an impressive image quality of 0.6 arcsec in the i-band in the Wide layer. We show that we achieve 1-2 per cent PSF photometry (rms) both internally and externally (against Pan-STARRS1), and ~10 mas and 40 mas internal and external astrometric accuracy, respectively. Both the calibrated images and catalogs are made available to the community through dedicated user interfaces and database servers. In addition to the pipeline products, we also provide value-added products such as photometric redshifts and a collection of public spectroscopic redshifts. Detailed descriptions of all the data can be found online. The data release website is https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/.
  • We present a new analysis of the stellar mass function and morphology of recently-quenched galaxies (RQGs), whose star formation has been recently quenched for some reason. The COSMOS2015 catalog was exploited to select those galaxies at 0.2 < z < 4.8, over 1.5 deg2 of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) UltraVISTA field. This is the first time that RQGs are consistently selected and studied in such a wide range of redshift. We find increasing number density of RQGs with time in a broad mass range at z>1, while low-mass RQGs start to grow very rapidly at z < 1. We also demonstrate that the migration of RQGs may largely drive the evolution of the stellar mass function of passive galaxies. Moreover, we find that the morphological type distribution of RQGs are intermediate between those of star-forming and passive galaxies. These results indicate that RQGs represent a major transitional phase of galaxy evolution, in which star-forming galaxies turn into passive galaxies, accompanied by the build up of spheroidal component.
  • We present spectroscopic identification of 32 new quasars and luminous galaxies discovered at 5.7 < z < 6.8. This is the second in a series of papers presenting the results of the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the deep multi-band imaging data produced by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program survey. The photometric candidates were selected by a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm, and then observed with spectrographs on the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope. Combined with the sample presented in the previous paper, we have now identified 64 HSC sources over about 430 deg2, which include 33 high-z quasars, 14 high-z luminous galaxies, 2 [O III] emitters at z ~ 0.8, and 15 Galactic brown dwarfs. The new quasars have considerably lower luminosity (M1450 ~ -25 to -22 mag) than most of the previously known high-z quasars. Several of these quasars have luminous (> 10^(43) erg/s) and narrow (< 500 km/s) Ly alpha lines, and also a possible mini broad absorption line system of N V 1240 in the composite spectrum, which clearly separate them from typical quasars. On the other hand, the high-z galaxies have extremely high luminosity (M1450 ~ -24 to -22 mag) compared to other galaxies found at similar redshift. With the discovery of these new classes of objects, we are opening up new parameter spaces in the high-z Universe. Further survey observations and follow-up studies of the identified objects, including the construction of the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 6, are ongoing.
  • Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the high-redshift Universe are thought to reside in overdense environments. However, recent works provide controversial results partly due to the use of different techniques and possible suppression of nearby galaxy formation by AGN feedback. We conducted deep and wide-field imaging observations with the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope and searched for Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) around two QSOs (quasi-stellar objects) at $z\sim4.9$ and a radio galaxy at $z\sim4.5$ by using narrow-band filters to address these issues more robustly. In the QSO fields, we obtained additional broad-band images to select Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at $z\sim5$ for comparison. We constructed a photometric sample of 301 LAEs and 170 LBGs in total. A wide field of view (34arcmin$\times$27arcmin, corresponding to 80$\times$60 comoving Mpc$^2$) of the Suprime-Cam enabled us to probe galaxies in the immediate vicinities of the AGNs and in the blank fields simultaneously and compare various properties of them in a consistent manner. The two QSOs are located near local density peaks ($<2\sigma$) and one of the QSOs has a close companion LAE with projected separation of 80 physical kpc. The radio galaxy is found to be near a void of LAEs. The number densities of LAEs/LGBs in a larger spatial scale around the AGNs are not significantly different from those in blank fields. No sign of feedback is found down to $L_{Ly\alpha}\sim10^{41.8}\mathrm{~erg~s^{-1}}$. Our results suggest that high-redshift AGNs are not associated with extreme galaxy overdensity and that this cannot be attributed to the effect of AGN feedback.
  • We examine the clustering of quasars over a wide luminosity range, by utilizing 901 quasars at $\overline{z}_{\rm phot}\sim3.8$ with $-24.73<M_{\rm 1450}<-22.23$ photometrically selected from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) S16A Wide2 date release and 342 more luminous quasars at $3.4<z_{\rm spec}<4.6$ having $-28.0<M_{\rm 1450}<-23.95$ from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that fall in the HSC survey fields. We measure the bias factors of two quasar samples by evaluating the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) between the quasar samples and 25790 bright $z\sim4$ Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in $M_{\rm 1450}<-21.25$ photometrically selected from the HSC dataset. Over an angular scale of \timeform{10.0"} to \timeform{1000.0"}, the bias factors are $5.93^{+1.34}_{-1.43}$ and $2.73^{+2.44}_{-2.55}$ for the low and high luminosity quasars, respectively, indicating no luminosity dependence of quasar clustering at $z\sim4$. It is noted that the bias factor of the luminous quasars estimated by the CCF is smaller than that estimated by the auto-correlation function (ACF) over a similar redshift range, especially on scales below \timeform{40.0"}. Moreover, the bias factor of the less-luminous quasars implies the minimal mass of their host dark matter halos (DMHs) is $0.3$-$2\times10^{12}h^{-1}M_{\odot}$, corresponding to a quasar duty cycle of $0.001$-$0.06$.
  • We present the luminosity function of z=4 quasars based on the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program Wide layer imaging data in the g, r, i, z, and y bands covering 339.8 deg^2. From stellar objects, 1666 z~4 quasar candidates are selected by the g-dropout selection down to i=24.0 mag. Their photometric redshifts cover the redshift range between 3.6 and 4.3 with an average of 3.9. In combination with the quasar sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the same redshift range, the quasar luminosity function covering the wide luminosity range of M1450=-22 to -29 mag is constructed. It is well described by a double power-law model with a knee at M1450=-25.36+-0.13 mag and a flat faint-end slope with a power-law index of -1.30+-0.05. The knee and faint-end slope show no clear evidence of redshift evolution from those at z~2. The flat slope implies that the UV luminosity density of the quasar population is dominated by the quasars around the knee, and does not support the steeper faint-end slope at higher redshifts reported at z>5. If we convert the M1450 luminosity function to the hard X-ray 2-10keV luminosity function using the relation between UV and X-ray luminosity of quasars and its scatter, the number density of UV-selected quasars matches well with that of the X-ray-selected AGNs above the knee of the luminosity function. Below the knee, the UV-selected quasars show a deficiency compared to the hard X-ray luminosity function. The deficiency can be explained by the lack of obscured AGNs among the UV-selected quasars.
  • We report the serendipitous discovery of a quadruply lensed source at $z_{\rm s}=3.76$, HSC~J115252+004733, from the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Survey. The source is lensed by an early-type galaxy at $z_{\rm l}=0.466$ and a satellite galaxy. Here, we investigate the properties of the source by studying its size and luminosity from the imaging and the luminosity and velocity width of the Ly-$\alpha$ line from the spectrum. Our analyses suggest that the source is most probably a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) but the possibility of it being a compact bright galaxy (e.g., a Lyman-$\alpha$ emitter or Lyman Break Galaxy) cannot be excluded. The brighter pair of lensed images appears point-like except in the HSC $i$-band (with a seeing $\sim0.5"$). The extended emission in the $i$-band image could be due to the host galaxy underneath the AGN, or alternatively, due to a highly compact lensed galaxy (without AGN) which appears point-like in all bands except in $i$-band. We also find that the flux ratio of the brighter pair of images is different in the Ks-band compared to optical wavelengths. Phenomena such as differential extinction and intrinsic variability cannot explain this chromatic variation. While microlensing from stars in the foreground galaxy is less likely to be the cause, it cannot be ruled out completely. If the galaxy hosts an AGN, then this represents the highest redshift quadruply imaged AGN known to date, enabling study of a distant LLAGN. Discovery of this unusually compact and faint source demonstrates the potential of the HSC survey.
  • We present measurements of the clustering properties of a sample of infrared (IR) bright dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs). Combining 125 deg$^2$ of wide and deep optical images obtained with the Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope and all-sky mid-IR (MIR) images taken with Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, we have discovered 4,367 IR-bright DOGs with $(i - [22])_{\rm AB}$ $>$ 7.0 and flux density at 22 $\mu$m $>$ 1.0 mJy. We calculate the angular autocorrelation function (ACF) for a uniform subsample of 1411 DOGs with 3.0 mJy $<$ flux (22 $mu$m) $<$ 5.0 mJy and $i_{\rm AB}$ $<$ 24.0. The ACF of our DOG subsample is well-fit with a single power-law, $\omega (\theta)$ = (0.010 $\pm$ 0.003) $\theta^{-0.9}$, where $\theta$ in degrees. The correlation amplitude of IR-bright DOGs is larger than that of IR-faint DOGs, which reflects a flux-dependence of the DOG clustering, as suggested by Brodwin et al. (2008). We assume that the redshift distribution for our DOG sample is Gaussian, and consider 2 cases: (1) the redshift distribution is the same as IR-faint DOGs with flux at 22 $\mu$m $<$ 1.0 mJy, mean and sigma $z$ = 1.99 $\pm$ 0.45, and (2) $z$ = 1.19 $\pm$ 0.30, as inferred from their photometric redshifts. The inferred correlation length of IR-bright DOGs is $r_0$ = 12.0 $\pm$ 2.0 and 10.3 $\pm$ 1.7 $h^{-1}$ Mpc, respectively. IR-bright DOGs reside in massive dark matter halos with a mass of $\log [\langle M_{\mathrm{h}} \rangle / (h^{-1} M_{\odot})]$ = 13.57$_{-0.55}^{+0.50}$ and 13.65$_{-0.52}^{+0.45}$ in the two cases, respectively.
  • We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100 % at the brighter magnitudes (zAB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Ly alpha lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z > 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M1450 ~ -22 mag or zAB ~24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.
  • Recent large-scale infrared surveys have been revealing stellar populations in the inner Galaxy seen through strong interstellar extinction in the disk. In particular, classical Cepheids with their period-luminosity and period-age relations are useful tracers of Galactic structure and evolution. Interesting groups of Cepheids reported recently include four Cepheids in the Nuclear Stellar Disk (NSD), about 200 pc around the Galactic Centre, found by Matsunaga et al. and those spread across the inner part of the disk reported by Dekany and collaborators. We here report our discovery of nearly thirty classical Cepheids towards the bulge region, some of which are common with Dekany et al., and discuss the large impact of the reddening correction on distance estimates for these objects. Assuming that the four Cepheids in the NSD are located at the distance of the Galactic Centre and that the near-infrared extinction law, i.e. wavelength dependency of the interstellar extinction, is not systematically different between the NSD and other bulge lines-of-sight, most of the other Cepheids presented here are located significantly further than the Galactic Centre. This suggests a lack of Cepheids in the inner 2.5 kpc region of the Galactic disk except the NSD. Recent radio observations show a similar distribution of star-forming regions.
  • Quasar host galaxies are key for understanding the relation between galaxies and the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at their centers. We present a study of 191 broad-line quasars and their host galaxies at z < 1, using high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. Clear detection of stellar absorption lines allows a reliable decomposition of the observed spectra into nuclear and host components, using spectral models of quasar and stellar radiations as well as emission lines from the interstellar medium. We estimate age, mass (M*), and velocity dispersion (sigma*) of the host stars, the star formation rate (SFR), quasar luminosity, and SMBH mass (Mbh), for each object. The quasars are preferentially hosted by massive galaxies with M* ~ 10^{11} Msun characterized by stellar ages around a billion years, which coincides with the transition phase of normal galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence. The host galaxies have relatively low SFRs and fall below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. These facts suggest that the hosts have experienced an episode of major star formation sometime in the past billion years, which was subsequently quenched or suppressed. The derived Mbh - sigma* and Mbh - M* relations agree with our past measurements and are consistent with no evolution from the local Universe. The present analysis demonstrates that reliable measurements of stellar properties of quasar host galaxies are possible with high-SNR fiber spectra, which will be acquired in large numbers with future powerful instruments such as the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph.
  • We present the photometric properties of a sample of infrared (IR) bright dust obscured galaxies (DOGs). Combining wide and deep optical images obtained with the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the Subaru Telescope and all-sky mid-IR (MIR) images taken with Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered 48 DOGs with $i - K_\mathrm{s} > 1.2$ and $i - [22] > 7.0$, where $i$, $K_\mathrm{s}$, and [22] represent AB magnitude in the $i$-band, $K_\mathrm{s}$-band, and 22 $\mu$m, respectively, in the GAMA 14hr field ($\sim$ 9 deg$^2$). Among these objects, 31 ($\sim$ 65 %) show power-law spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in the near-IR (NIR) and MIR regime, while the remainder show a NIR bump in their SEDs. Assuming that the redshift distribution for our DOGs sample is Gaussian, with mean and sigma $z$ = 1.99 $\pm$ 0.45, we calculated their total IR luminosity using an empirical relation between 22 $\mu$m luminosity and total IR luminosity. The average value of the total IR luminosity is (3.5 $\pm$ 1.1) $\times$ $10^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$, which classifies them as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs). We also derived the total IR luminosity function (LF) and IR luminosity density (LD) for a flux-limited subsample of 18 DOGs with 22 $\mu$m flux greater than 3.0 mJy and with $i$-band magnitude brighter than 24 AB magnitude. The derived space density for this subsample is log $\phi$ = -6.59 $\pm$ 0.11 [Mpc$^{-3}$]. The IR LF for DOGs including data obtained from the literature is well fitted by a double-power law. The derived lower limit for the IR LD for our sample is $\rho_{\mathrm{IR}}$ $\sim$ 3.8 $\times$ 10$^7$ [L$_{\odot}$ Mpc$^{-3}$] and its contributions to the total IR LD, IR LD of all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), and that of all DOGs are $>$ 3 %, $>$ 9 %, and $>$ 15 %, respectively.
  • The stellar properties of about 800 galaxies hosting optically luminous, unobscured quasars at z < 0.6 are analyzed. Deep co-added Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images of the quasars on Stripe 82 are decomposed into nucleus and host galaxy using point spread function and Sersic models. The systematic errors in the measured galaxy absolute magnitudes and colors are estimated to be less than 0.5 mag and 0.1 mag, respectively, with simulated quasar images. The effect of quasar light scattered by the interstellar medium is also carefully addressed. The measured quasar-to-galaxy ratio in total flux decreases toward longer wavelengths, from ~8 in the u band to ~1 in the i and z bands. We find that the SDSS quasars are hosted exclusively by massive galaxies (stellar mass Mstar > 10^{10} Msun), which is consistent with previous results for less luminous narrow-line (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The quasar hosts are very blue and almost absent on the red sequence, showing stark contrast to the color-magnitude distribution of normal galaxies. The fact that more powerful AGNs reside in galaxies with higher star-formation efficiency may indicate that negative AGN feedback, if it exists, is not concurrent with the most luminous phase of AGNs. We also find positive correlation between the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs; Mbh) and host stellar mass, but the Mbh - Mstar relation is offset toward large Mbh or small Mstar compared to the local relation. While this could indicate that SMBHs grow earlier than do their host galaxies, such an argument is not conclusive, as the effect may be dominated by observational biases.
  • The unification of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a model that has been difficult to test due to the lack of knowledge on the intrinsic luminosities of the objects. We present a test were we probe the model by statistical investigation of the neighbours to AGN at redshifts 0.03 < z < 0.2 within a projected distance of 350 kpc and |\Delta z|<0.001, 0.006, 0.012 and 0.03 between AGN and neighbour. 1658 Type-1 (broad-line) AGN-galaxy pairs and 5698 Type-2 AGN-galaxy pairs with spectroscopic redshifts from the Data Release 7 of Sloan Digital Sky Survey were used together with a complementary set of pairs with photometric redshifts on the neighbour galaxies (13519 Type-1 AGN-galaxy and 58743 Type-2 AGN-galaxy pairs). Morphologies for the AGN host galaxies were derived from the Galaxy Zoo project. Our results suggest that broad-line AGN and narrow-line AGN reside in widely different environments where the neighbours to Type-2 AGN are more star-forming and bluer than those of Type-1 AGN. There is a colour-dependency only detectable in the neighbours with photometric redshifts for the Type-2 AGN. We see that the ratio between Type-1/Type-2 neighbours to Type-2 AGN decreases steadily at short separations with a statistical significance of 4.5 sigma. The lack of change in the morphology of the Type-2 AGN hosts having a close companion (contrary to the case of Type-1 AGN hosts) suggests that the innate state of Type-2 AGN is extremely short-lived and is not preserved in subsequent mergers. Finally, we perform a hypothetical luminosity test to investigate whether a mass bias in our selection could explain the observed differences in our samples. Our conclusion is that AGN unification is consistently not supported by the environment of the two types of AGN, but that an evolutionary connection between them might exist.
  • We present the results of our follow-up observation program of gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. 26 blazars and 39 sources unidentified at other wavelengths were targeted at IRSF 1.4 m telescope equipped with the SIRIUS/SIRPOL imager and polarimeter. H-band magnitudes of the blazars at the epoch of 2010 Dec -- 2011 Feb are presented, which reveal clear flux variation since the Two Micron All Sky Survey observations and can be useful data for variation analyses of these objects in longer periods. We also find that nearly half of the gamma-ray blazars are highly (>10 %) polarized in near-infrared wavelengths. Combining the polarization and variation properties, most (~90 %) of the blazars are clearly distinguished from all other types of objects at high Galactic latitudes. On the other hand, we find only one highly polarized and/or variable object in the fields of unidentified sources. This object is a counterpart of the optical variable source PQV1 J131553.00-073302.0 and the radio source NVSS J131552-073301, and is a promising candidate of new gamma-ray blazars. From the measured polarization and variation statistics, we conclude that most of the Fermi/LAT unidentified sources are not likely similar types of objects to the known gamma-ray blazars.