• One of the key technologies in spintronics is to tame spin-orbit coupling (SOC) that links spin and motion of electrons, giving rise to intriguing magneto-transport properties in itinerant magnets. Prominent examples of such SOC-based phenomena are anomalous and topological Hall effects. However, controlling them by electric field has remained unachieved since electric field tends to be screened in itinerant magnets. Here we demonstrate that both anomalous and topological Hall effects can be modulated by electric field in oxide heterostructures consisting of ferromagnetic SrRuO$_{3}$ and nonmagnetic SrIrO$_{3}$. We observed clear electric-field effect only when SrIrO$_{3}$ is inserted between SrRuO$_{3}$ and a gate dielectric. Our results establish that strong SOC of nonmagnetic materials such as SrIrO$_{3}$ is essential in electrical tuning of these Hall effects and possibly other SOC-related phenomena.
  • A well known semiconductor Cd3As2 has reentered the spotlight due to its unique electronic structure and quantum transport phenomena as a topological Dirac semimetal. For elucidating and controlling its topological quantum state, high-quality Cd3As2 thin films have been highly desired. Here we report the development of an elaborate growth technique of high-crystallinity and high-mobility Cd3As2 films with controlled thicknesses and the observation of quantum Hall effect dependent on the film thickness. With decreasing the film thickness to 10 nm, the quantum Hall states exhibit variations such as a change in the spin degeneracy reflecting the Dirac dispersion with a large Fermi velocity. Details of the electronic structure including subband splitting and gap opening are identified from the quantum transport depending on the confinement thickness, suggesting the presence of a two-dimensional topological insulating phase. The demonstration of quantum Hall states in our high-quality Cd3As2 films paves a road to study quantum transport and device application in topological Dirac semimetal and its derivative phases.
  • Formation of the triangular skyrmion-lattice is found in a tetragonal polar magnet VOSe$_2$O$_5$. By magnetization and small-angle neutron scattering measurements on the single crystals, we identify a cycloidal spin state at zero field and a N\'eel-type skyrmion-lattice phase under a magnetic field along the polar axis. Adjacent to this phase, another magnetic phase of an incommensurate spin texture is identified at lower temperatures, tentatively assigned to a square skyrmion-lattice phase. These findings exemplify the versatile features of N\'eel-type skyrmions in bulk materials, and provide a unique occasion to explore the physics of topological spin textures in polar magnets.
  • Spin orbit interaction can be strongly boosted when a heavy element is embedded into an inversion asymmetric crystal field. A simple structure to realize this concept in a 2D crystal contains three atomic layers, a middle one built up from heavy elements generating strong atomic spin-orbit interaction and two neighboring atomic layers with different electron negativity. BiTeI is a promising candidate for such a 2D crystal, since it contains heavy Bi layer between Te and I layers. Recently the bulk form of BiTeI attracted considerable attention due to its giant Rashba interaction, however, 2D form of this crystal was not yet created. In this work we report the first exfoliation of single layer BiTeI using a recently developed exfoliation technique on stripped gold. Our combined scanning probe studies and first principles calculations show that SL BiTeI flakes with sizes of 100 $\mu$m were achieved which are stable at ambient conditions. The giant Rashba splitting and spin-momentum locking of this new member of 2D crystals open the way towards novel spintronic applications and synthetic topological heterostructures.
  • Instability of quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect has been studied as function of electric current and temperature in ferromagnetic topological insulator thin films. We find that a characteristic current for the breakdown of the QAH effect is roughly proportional to the Hall-bar width, indicating that Hall electric field is relevant to the breakdown. We also find that electron transport is dominated by variable range hopping (VRH) at low temperatures. Combining the current and temperature dependences of the conductivity in the VRH regime, the localization length of the QAH state is evaluated to be about 5 $\mu$m. The long localization length suggests a marginally insulating nature of the QAH state due to a large number of in-gap states.
  • Small angle neutron scattering measurements have been performed to study the thermodynamic stability of skyrmion-lattice phases in Cu$_2$OSeO$_3$. We found that the two distinct skyrmion-lattice phases [SkX(1) and SkX(2) phases] can be stabilized through different thermal histories; by cooling from the paramagnetic phase under finite magnetic field, the SkX(2) phase is selected. On the other hand, the 30$^{\circ}$-rotated SkX(1) phase becomes dominant by heating the sample from the ordered conical phase under finite field. This difference in stabilization is surprisingly similar to the irreversibility observed in spin glasses. The zero-field cooling results in the co-existence of the two phases. It is further found that once one of the skyrmion-lattice phases is formed, it is hardly destabilized. This indicates unusual thermal stability of the two skyrmion-lattice phases originating from an unexpectedly large energy barrier between them.
  • Small angle neutron inelastic scattering measurement has been performed to study the magnon dispersion relation in the field-induced-ferromagnetic phase of the noncentrosymmetric binary compound MnSi. For the magnons propagating parallel or anti-parallel to the external magnetic field, we experimentally confirmed that the dispersion relation is asymmetrically shifted along the magnetic field direction. This magnon dispersion shift is attributed to the relativistic Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which is finite in noncentrosymmetric magnets, such as MnSi. The shift direction is found to be switchable by reversing the external magnetic field direction.
  • Complex many-body interaction in perovskite manganites gives rise to a strong competition between ferromagnetic metallic and charge ordered phases with nanoscale electronic inhomogeneity and glassy behaviors. Investigating this glassy state requires high resolution imaging techniques with sufficient sensitivity and stability. Here, we present the results of a near-field microwave microscope imaging on the strain driven glassy state in a manganite film. The high contrast between the two electrically distinct phases allows direct visualization of the phase separation. The low temperature microscopic configurations differ upon cooling with different thermal histories. At sufficiently high temperatures, we observe switching between the two phases in either direction. The dynamic switching, however, stops below the glass transition temperature. Compared with the magnetization data, the phase separation was microscopically frozen, while spin relaxation was found in a short period of time.
  • We find that the motion of the valley electrons -- electronic states close to the ${\rm K}$ and ${\rm K'}$ points of the Brillouin zone -- is confined into two dimension when the layers of MoS$_{2}$ follow the 3R stacking, while in the 2H polytype the bands have dispersion in all the three dimensions. According to our first-principles band structure calculations, the valley states have no interlayer hopping in 3R-MoS$_{2}$, which is proved to be the consequence of the rotational symmetry of the Bloch functions. By measuring the reflectivity spectra and analyzing an anisotropic hydrogen atomic model, we confirm that the valley excitons in 3R-MoS$_{2}$ have two-dimensional hydrogen-like spectral series, and the spreads of the wave function are smaller than the interlayer distance. In contrast, the valley excitons in 2H-MoS$_{2}$ are well described by the three-dimensional model and thus not confined in a single layer. Our results indicate that the dimensionality of the valley degree of freedom can be controlled simply by the stacking geometry, which can be utilized in future valleytronics.
  • Piezo-magnetoelectric effect, namely simultaneous induction of both the ferromagnetic moment and electric polarization by an application of uniaxial stress, was achieved in the non-ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic ground state of DyFeO$_3$. The induced electric polarization and ferromagnetic moment are coupled with each other, and monotonically increase with increasing uniaxial stress. The present work provides a new way to design spin-driven multiferroic states, that is, magnetic symmetry breaking forced by external uniaxial stress.
  • Emergent phenomena and functions arising from topological electron-spin textures in real space or momentum space are attracting growing interest for new concept of states of matter as well as for possible applications to spintronics. One such example is a magnetic skyrmion, a topologically stable nanoscale spin vortex structure characterized by a topological index. Real-space regular arrays of skyrmions are described by combination of multi-directional spin helixes. Nanoscale configurations and characteristics of the two-dimensional skyrmion hexagonal-lattice have been revealed extensively by real-space observations. Other three-dimensional forms of skyrmion lattices, such as a cubic-lattice of skyrmions, are also anticipated to exist, yet their direct observations remain elusive. Here we report real-space observations of spin configurations of the skyrmion cubic-lattice in MnGe with a very short period (~3 nm) and hence endowed with the largest skyrmion number density. The skyrmion lattices parallel to the {100} atomic lattices are directly observed using Lorentz transmission electron microscopes (Lorentz TEMs). It enables the first simultaneous observation of magnetic skyrmions and underlying atomic-lattice fringes. These results indicate the emergence of skyrmion-antiskyrmion lattice in MnGe, which is a source of emergent electromagnetic responses and will open a possibility of controlling few-nanometer scale skyrmion lattices through atomic lattice modulations.
  • Skyrmions, novel topologically stable spin vortices, hold promise for next-generation magnetic storage due to their nanoscale domains to enable high information storage density and their low threshold for current-driven motion to enable ultralow energy consumption. One-dimensional (1D) nanowires are ideal hosts for skyrmions since they not only serve as a natural platform for magnetic racetrack memory devices but also can potentially stabilize skyrmions. Here we use the topological Hall effect (THE) to study the phase stability and current-driven dynamics of the skyrmions in MnSi nanowires. The THE was observed in an extended magnetic field-temperature window (15 to 30 K), suggesting stabilization of skyrmion phase in nanowires compared with the bulk (27 to 29.5 K). Furthermore, for the first time, we study skyrmion dynamics in this extended skyrmion phase region and found that under the high current-density of $10^{8}-10^{9} Am^{-2}$ enabled by nanowire geometry, the THE decreases with increasing current densities, which demonstrates the current-driven motion of skyrmions generating the emergent electric field. These results open up the exploration of nanowires as an attractive platform for investigating skyrmion physics in 1D systems and exploiting skyrmions in magnetic storage concepts.
  • We report a quantum magnetotransport signature of a change in Fermi surface topology in the Rashba semiconductor BiTeI with systematic tuning of the Fermi level $E_F$. Beyond the quantum limit, we observe a marked increase/decrease in electrical resistivity when $E_F$ is above/below the Dirac node that we show originates from the Fermi surface topology. This effect represents a measurement of the electron distribution on the low-index ($n=0,-1$) Landau levels and is uniquely enabled by the finite bulk $k_z$ dispersion along the $c$-axis and strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling strength of the system. The Dirac node is independently identified by Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations as a vanishing Fermi surface cross section at $k_z=0$. Additionally we find that the violation of Kohler's rule allows a distinct insight into the temperature evolution of the observed quantum magnetoresistance effects.
  • Optical excitations of BiTeI with large Rashba spin splitting have been studied in an external magnetic field ($B$) applied parallel to the polar axis. A sequence of transitions between the Landau levels (LLs), whose energies are in proportion to $\sqrt{B}$ were observed, being characteristic of massless Dirac electrons. The large separation energy between the LLs makes it possible to detect the strongest cyclotron resonance even at room temperature in moderate fields. Unlike in 2D Dirac systems, the magnetic field induced rearrangement of the conductivity spectrum is directly observed.
  • The optical magnetoelectric effect, which is an inherent attribute of the spin excitations in multiferroics, drastically changes their optical properties compared to conventional materials where light-matter interaction is expressed only by the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability. Our polarized absorption experiments performed on multiferroic Ca2CoSi2O7 and Ba2CoGe2O7 in the THz spectral range demonstrate that such magnetoeletric spin excitations show quadrochroism, i.e. they have different colours for all the four combinations of the two propagation directions (forward or backward) and the two orthogonal polarizations of a light beam. We found that quadrochroism can give rise to peculiar optical properties, such as one-way transparency and zero-reflection of these excitations, which can open a new horizon in photonics. One-way transparency is also related to the static magnetoelectric phenomena, hence, these optical studies can provide guidelines for the systematic synthesis of new materials with large dc magnetoelectric effect.
  • The race to obtain a higher critical temperature (Tc) in the superconducting cuprates has been virtually suspended since it was optimized under high pressure in a hole-doped trilayer cuprate. We report the anomalous increase in Tc under high pressure for the electron-doped infinite-layer cuprate Sr0.9La0.1CuO2 in the vicinity of the antiferromagnetic critical point. By the application of a pressure of 15 GPa, Tc increases to 45 K, which is the highest temperature among the electron-doped cuprates and ensures unconventional superconductivity. We describe the electronic phase diagram of Sr1-xLaxCuO2 to discuss the relation between the antiferromagnetic order and superconductivity.
  • Manganites are technologically important materials, used widely as solid oxide fuel cell cathodes: they have also been shown to exhibit electroresistance. Oxygen bulk diffusion and surface exchange processes are critical for catalytic action, and numerous studies of manganites have linked electroresistance to electrochemical oxygen migration. Direct imaging of individual oxygen defects is needed to underpin understanding of these important processes. It is not currently possible to collect the required images in the bulk, but scanning tunnelling microscopy could provide such data for surfaces. Here we show the first atomic resolution images of oxygen defects at a manganite surface. Our experiments also reveal defect dynamics, including oxygen adatom migration, vacancy-adatom recombination and adatom bistability. Beyond providing an experimental basis for testing models describing the microscopics of oxygen migration at transition metal oxide interfaces, our work resolves the long-standing puzzle of why scanning tunnelling microscopy is more challenging for layered manganites than for cuprates.
  • Electromagnetic field (EMF) is the most fundamental field in condensed-matter physics. Interaction between electrons, electron-ion interaction, and ion-ion interaction are all of the electromagnetic origin, while the other 3 fundamental forces, i.e., gravitational force, weak and strong interactions are irrelevant in the energy/length scales of condensed-matter physics. Also the physical properties of condensed-matters such as transport, optical, magnetic and dielectric properties, are almost described as their electromagnetic responses. In addition to this EMF in the low energy sector, it often happens that the gauge fields appear as the emergent phenomenon due to the projection of the electronic wavefunctions onto the curved manifold of the Hilbert sub-space. These emergent electromagnetic fields (EEMF's) play important roles in many places in condensed-matter physics including the quantum Hall effect, strongly correlated electrons, and also in non-interacting electron systems. In this article, we describe its fundamental idea and some of the applications recently studied.
  • Right- and left-handed circularly polarized light interact differently with electronic charges in chiral materials. This asymmetry generates the natural circular dichroism and gyrotropy, also known as the optical activity. Here we demonstrate that optical activity is not a privilege of the electronic charge excitations but it can also emerge for the spin excitations in magnetic matter. The square-lattice antiferromagnet Ba$_2$CoGe$_2$O$_7$ offers an ideal arena to test this idea, since it can be transformed to a chiral form by application of external magnetic fields. As a direct proof of the field-induced chiral state, we observed large optical activity when the light is in resonance with spin excitations at sub-terahertz frequencies. In addition, we found that the magnetochiral effect, the absorption difference for the light beams propagating parallel and anti-parallel to the applied magnetic field, has an exceptionally large amplitude close to 100%. All these features are ascribed to the magnetoelectric nature of spin excitations as they interact both with the electric and magnetic components of light.
  • To date, two types of coupling between electromagnetic radiation and a crystal lattice have been identified experimentally. One is direct, for infrared (IR)-active vibrations that carry an electric dipole. The second is indirect, it occurs through intermediate excitation of the electronic system via electron-phonon coupling, as in stimulated Raman scattering. Nearly 40 years ago, proposals were made of a third path, referred to as ionic Raman scattering (IRS). It was posited that excitation of an IR-active phonon could serve as the intermediate state for a Raman scattering process relying on lattice anharmonicity as opposed to electron phonon interaction. In this paper, we report an experimental demonstration of ionic Raman scattering and show that this mechanism is relevant to optical control in solids. The key insight is that a rectified phonon field can exert a directional force onto the crystal, inducing an abrupt displacement of the atoms from the equilibrium positions that could not be achieved through excitation of an IR-active vibration alone, for which the force is oscillatory. IRS opens up a new direction for the coherent control of solids in their electronic ground state, different from approaches that rely on electronic excitations.
  • Although ferroelectric compounds containing hydrogen bonds were among the first to be discovered, organic ferroelectrics are relatively rare. The discovery of high polarization at room temperature in croconic acid [Nature \textbf{463}, 789 (2010)] has led to a renewed interest in organic ferroelectrics. We present an ab-initio study of two ferroelectric organic molecular crystals, 1-cyclobutene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (CBDC) and 2-phenylmalondialdehyde (PhMDA). By using a distortion-mode analysis we shed light on the microscopic mechanisms contributing to the polarization, which we find to be as large as 14.3 and 7.0\,$\mu$C/cm$^{2}$ for CBDC and PhMDA respectively. These results suggest that it may be fruitful to search among known but poorly characterized organic compounds for organic ferroelectrics with enhanced polar properties suitable for device applications.
  • Spin precession was nonthermally induced by an ultrashort laser pulse in orthoferrite DyFeO3 with a pump-probe technique. Both circularly and linearly polarized pulses led to spin precessions; these phenomena are interpreted as the inverse Faraday effect and the inverse Cotton-Mouton effect, respectively. For both cases, the same mode of spin precession was excited; the precession frequencies and polarization were the same, but the phases of oscillations were different. We have shown theoretically and experimentally that the analysis of phases can distinguish between these two mechanisms. We have demonstrated experimentally that in the visible region, the inverse Faraday effect was dominant, whereas the inverse Cotton-Mouton effect became relatively prominent in the near-infrared region.
  • Many unusual behaviors in complex oxides are deeply associated with the spontaneous emergence of microscopic phase separation. Depending on the underlying mechanism, the competing phases can form ordered or random patterns at vastly different length scales. Using a microwave impedance microscope, we observed an orientation-ordered percolating network in strained Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 thin films with a large period of 100 nm. The filamentary metallic domains align preferentially along certain crystal axes of the substrate, suggesting the anisotropic elastic strain as the key interaction in this system. The local impedance maps provide microscopic electrical information of the hysteretic behavior in strained thin film manganites, suggesting close connection between the glassy order and the colossal magnetoresistance effects at low temperatures.
  • Hard X-ray and extremely low energy bulk-sensitive photoelectron spectroscopy has been performed in the temperature range of 100-330 K for Fe3O4. In the high temperature phase just above the Verwey transition, the intensity at the Fermi level (EF) is still negligible, but it increases gradually with further increasing the temperature (250 K, 330 K) in consistence with the temperature dependence of the conductivity. The spectral behaviors near EF with temperature are well explained by the model, which takes the polaron effect into account.
  • Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) profiles revealed the existence of magnetic textures like liquid crystals in the low-temperature helical phase of Fe0.7Co0.3Si, isomorphous of MnSi.