• The identification of an unknown quantum gate is a significant issue in quantum technology. In this paper, we propose a quantum gate identification method within the framework of quantum process tomography. In this method, a series of pure states are inputted to the gate and then a fast state tomography on the output states is performed and the data are used to reconstruct the quantum gate. Our algorithm has computational complexity $O(d^3)$ with the system dimension $d$. The algorithm is compared with maximum likelihood estimation method for the running time, which shows the efficiency advantage of our method. An error upper bound is established for the identification algorithm and the robustness of the algorithm against the purity of input states is also tested. We perform quantum optical experiment on single-qubit Hadamard gate to verify the effectiveness of the identification algorithm.
  • Quantum Hamiltonian identification is important for characterizing the dynamics of quantum systems, calibrating quantum devices and achieving precise quantum control. In this paper, an effective two-step optimization (TSO) quantum Hamiltonian identification algorithm is developed within the framework of quantum process tomography. In the identification method, different probe states are inputted into quantum systems and the output states are estimated using the quantum state tomography protocol via linear regression estimation. The time-independent system Hamiltonian is reconstructed based on the experimental data for the output states. The Hamiltonian identification method has computational complexity O(d^6) where d is the dimension of the system Hamiltonian. An error upper bound O(d^3/N^(1/2))$ is also established, where N is the resource number for the tomography of each output state, and several numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed TSO Hamiltonian identification method.
  • Full quantum state tomography (FQST) plays a unique role in the estimation of the state of a quantum system without \emph{a priori} knowledge or assumptions. Unfortunately, since FQST requires informationally (over)complete measurements, both the number of measurement bases and the computational complexity of data processing suffer an exponential growth with the size of the quantum system. A 14-qubit entangled state has already been experimentally prepared in an ion trap, and the data processing capability for FQST of a 14-qubit state seems to be far away from practical applications. In this paper, the computational capability of FQST is pushed forward to reconstruct a 14-qubit state with a run time of only 3.35 hours using the linear regression estimation (LRE) algorithm, even when informationally overcomplete Pauli measurements are employed. The computational complexity of the LRE algorithm is first reduced from $O(10^{19})$ to $O(10^{15})$ for a 14-qubit state, by dropping all the zero elements, and its computational efficiency is further sped up by fully exploiting the parallelism of the LRE algorithm with parallel Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) programming. Our result can play an important role in quantum information technologies with large quantum systems.
  • Adaptive techniques have important potential for wide applications in enhancing precision of quantum parameter estimation. We present a recursively adaptive quantum state tomography (RAQST) protocol for finite dimensional quantum systems and experimentally implement the adaptive tomography protocol on two-qubit systems. In this RAQST protocol, an adaptive measurement strategy and a recursive linear regression estimation algorithm are performed. Numerical results show that our RAQST protocol can outperform the tomography protocols using mutually unbiased bases (MUB) and the two-stage MUB adaptive strategy even with the simplest product measurements. When nonlocal measurements are available, our RAQST can beat the Gill-Massar bound for a wide range of quantum states with a modest number of copies. We use only the simplest product measurements to implement two-qubit tomography experiments. In the experiments, we use error-compensation techniques to tackle systematic error due to misalignments and imperfection of wave plates, and achieve about 100-fold reduction of the systematic error. The experimental results demonstrate that the improvement of RAQST over nonadaptive tomography is significant for states with a high level of purity. Our results also show that this recursively adaptive tomography method is particularly effective for the reconstruction of maximally entangled states, which are important resources in quantum information.