• Word embeddings are ubiquitous in NLP and information retrieval, but it is unclear what they represent when the word is polysemous. Here it is shown that multiple word senses reside in linear superposition within the word embedding and simple sparse coding can recover vectors that approximately capture the senses. The success of our approach, which applies to several embedding methods, is mathematically explained using a variant of the random walk on discourses model (Arora et al., 2016). A novel aspect of our technique is that each extracted word sense is accompanied by one of about 2000 "discourse atoms" that gives a succinct description of which other words co-occur with that word sense. Discourse atoms can be of independent interest, and make the method potentially more useful. Empirical tests are used to verify and support the theory.
  • We revisit the question of reducing online learning to approximate optimization of the offline problem. In this setting, we give two algorithms with near-optimal performance in the full information setting: they guarantee optimal regret and require only poly-logarithmically many calls to the approximation oracle per iteration. Furthermore, these algorithms apply to the more general improper learning problems. In the bandit setting, our algorithm also significantly improves the best previously known oracle complexity while maintaining the same regret.
  • We propose a reduction for non-convex optimization that can (1) turn an stationary-point finding algorithm into an local-minimum finding one, and (2) replace the Hessian-vector product computations with only gradient computations. It works both in the stochastic and the deterministic settings, without hurting the algorithm's performance. As applications, our reduction turns Natasha2 into a first-order method without hurting its performance. It also converts SGD, GD, SCSG, and SVRG into algorithms finding approximate local minima, outperforming some best known results.
  • We propose a new second-order method for geodesically convex optimization on the natural hyperbolic metric over positive definite matrices. We apply it to solve the operator scaling problem in time polynomial in the input size and logarithmic in the error. This is an exponential improvement over previous algorithms which were analyzed in the usual Euclidean, "commutative" metric (for which the above problem is not convex). Our method is general and applicable to other settings. As a consequence, we solve the equivalence problem for the left-right group action underlying the operator scaling problem. This yields a deterministic polynomial-time algorithm for a new class of Polynomial Identity Testing (PIT) problems, which was the original motivation for studying operator scaling.
  • We show that the gradient descent algorithm provides an implicit regularization effect in the learning of over-parameterized matrix factorization models and one-hidden-layer neural networks with quadratic activations. Concretely, we show that given $\tilde{O}(dr^{2})$ random linear measurements of a rank $r$ positive semidefinite matrix $X^{\star}$, we can recover $X^{\star}$ by parameterizing it by $UU^\top$ with $U\in \mathbb R^{d\times d}$ and minimizing the squared loss, even if $r \ll d$. We prove that starting from a small initialization, gradient descent recovers $X^{\star}$ in $\tilde{O}(\sqrt{r})$ iterations approximately. The results solve the conjecture of Gunasekar et al.'17 under the restricted isometry property. The technique can be applied to analyzing neural networks with one-hidden-layer quadratic activations with some technical modifications.
  • Mixtures of Linear Regressions (MLR) is an important mixture model with many applications. In this model, each observation is generated from one of the several unknown linear regression components, where the identity of the generated component is also unknown. Previous works either assume strong assumptions on the data distribution or have high complexity. This paper proposes a fixed parameter tractable algorithm for the problem under general conditions, which achieves global convergence and the sample complexity scales nearly linearly in the dimension. In particular, different from previous works that require the data to be from the standard Gaussian, the algorithm allows the data from Gaussians with different covariances. When the conditional number of the covariances and the number of components are fixed, the algorithm has nearly optimal sample complexity $N = \tilde{O}(d)$ as well as nearly optimal computational complexity $\tilde{O}(Nd)$, where $d$ is the dimension of the data space. To the best of our knowledge, this approach provides the first such recovery guarantee for this general setting.
  • Stochastic gradient descent (SGD) is widely used in machine learning. Although being commonly viewed as a fast but not accurate version of gradient descent (GD), it always finds better solutions than GD for modern neural networks. In order to understand this phenomenon, we take an alternative view that SGD is working on the convolved (thus smoothed) version of the loss function. We show that, even if the function $f$ has many bad local minima or saddle points, as long as for every point $x$, the weighted average of the gradients of its neighborhoods is one point convex with respect to the desired solution $x^*$, SGD will get close to, and then stay around $x^*$ with constant probability. More specifically, SGD will not get stuck at "sharp" local minima with small diameters, as long as the neighborhoods of these regions contain enough gradient information. The neighborhood size is controlled by step size and gradient noise. Our result identifies a set of functions that SGD provably works, which is much larger than the set of convex functions. Empirically, we observe that the loss surface of neural networks enjoys nice one point convexity properties locally, therefore our theorem helps explain why SGD works so well for neural networks.
  • Regret bounds in online learning compare the player's performance to $L^*$, the optimal performance in hindsight with a fixed strategy. Typically such bounds scale with the square root of the time horizon $T$. The more refined concept of first-order regret bound replaces this with a scaling $\sqrt{L^*}$, which may be much smaller than $\sqrt{T}$. It is well known that minor variants of standard algorithms satisfy first-order regret bounds in the full information and multi-armed bandit settings. In a COLT 2017 open problem, Agarwal, Krishnamurthy, Langford, Luo, and Schapire raised the issue that existing techniques do not seem sufficient to obtain first-order regret bounds for the contextual bandit problem. In the present paper, we resolve this open problem by presenting a new strategy based on augmenting the policy space.
  • We propose a rank-$k$ variant of the classical Frank-Wolfe algorithm to solve convex optimization over a trace-norm ball. Our algorithm replaces the top singular-vector computation ($1$-SVD) in Frank-Wolfe with a top-$k$ singular-vector computation ($k$-SVD), which can be done by repeatedly applying $1$-SVD $k$ times. Alternatively, our algorithm can be viewed as a rank-$k$ restricted version of projected gradient descent. We show that our algorithm has a linear convergence rate when the objective function is smooth and strongly convex, and the optimal solution has rank at most $k$. This improves the convergence rate and the total time complexity of the Frank-Wolfe method and its variants.
  • The online problem of computing the top eigenvector is fundamental to machine learning. In both adversarial and stochastic settings, previous results (such as matrix multiplicative weight update, follow the regularized leader, follow the compressed leader, block power method) either achieve optimal regret but run slow, or run fast at the expense of loosing a $\sqrt{d}$ factor in total regret where $d$ is the matrix dimension. We propose a $\textit{follow-the-compressed-leader (FTCL)}$ framework which achieves optimal regret without sacrificing the running time. Our idea is to "compress" the matrix strategy to dimension 3 in the adversarial setting, or dimension 1 in the stochastic setting. These respectively resolve two open questions regarding the design of optimal and efficient algorithms for the online eigenvector problem.
  • We study the active learning problem of top-$k$ ranking from multi-wise comparisons under the popular multinomial logit model. Our goal is to identify the top-$k$ items with high probability by adaptively querying sets for comparisons and observing the noisy output of the most preferred item from each comparison. To achieve this goal, we design a new active ranking algorithm without using any information about the underlying items' preference scores. We also establish a matching lower bound on the sample complexity even when the set of preference scores is given to the algorithm. These two results together show that the proposed algorithm is nearly instance optimal (similar to instance optimal [FLN03], but up to polylog factors). Our work extends the existing literature on rank aggregation in three directions. First, instead of studying a static problem with fixed data, we investigate the top-$k$ ranking problem in an active learning setting. Second, we show our algorithm is nearly instance optimal, which is a much stronger theoretical guarantee. Finally, we extend the pairwise comparison to the multi-wise comparison, which has not been fully explored in ranking literature.
  • Non-negative matrix factorization is a basic tool for decomposing data into the feature and weight matrices under non-negativity constraints, and in practice is often solved in the alternating minimization framework. However, it is unclear whether such algorithms can recover the ground-truth feature matrix when the weights for different features are highly correlated, which is common in applications. This paper proposes a simple and natural alternating gradient descent based algorithm, and shows that with a mild initialization it provably recovers the ground-truth in the presence of strong correlations. In most interesting cases, the correlation can be in the same order as the highest possible. Our analysis also reveals its several favorable features including robustness to noise. We complement our theoretical results with empirical studies on semi-synthetic datasets, demonstrating its advantage over several popular methods in recovering the ground-truth.
  • In recent years, stochastic gradient descent (SGD) based techniques has become the standard tools for training neural networks. However, formal theoretical understanding of why SGD can train neural networks in practice is largely missing. In this paper, we make progress on understanding this mystery by providing a convergence analysis for SGD on a rich subset of two-layer feedforward networks with ReLU activations. This subset is characterized by a special structure called "identity mapping". We prove that, if input follows from Gaussian distribution, with standard $O(1/\sqrt{d})$ initialization of the weights, SGD converges to the global minimum in polynomial number of steps. Unlike normal vanilla networks, the "identity mapping" makes our network asymmetric and thus the global minimum is unique. To complement our theory, we are also able to show experimentally that multi-layer networks with this mapping have better performance compared with normal vanilla networks. Our convergence theorem differs from traditional non-convex optimization techniques. We show that SGD converges to optimal in "two phases": In phase I, the gradient points to the wrong direction, however, a potential function $g$ gradually decreases. Then in phase II, SGD enters a nice one point convex region and converges. We also show that the identity mapping is necessary for convergence, as it moves the initial point to a better place for optimization. Experiment verifies our claims.
  • We solve principal component regression (PCR), up to a multiplicative accuracy $1+\gamma$, by reducing the problem to $\tilde{O}(\gamma^{-1})$ black-box calls of ridge regression. Therefore, our algorithm does not require any explicit construction of the top principal components, and is suitable for large-scale PCR instances. In contrast, previous result requires $\tilde{O}(\gamma^{-2})$ such black-box calls. We obtain this result by developing a general stable recurrence formula for matrix Chebyshev polynomials, and a degree-optimal polynomial approximation to the matrix sign function. Our techniques may be of independent interests, especially when designing iterative methods.
  • We study streaming principal component analysis (PCA), that is to find, in $O(dk)$ space, the top $k$ eigenvectors of a $d\times d$ hidden matrix $\bf \Sigma$ with online vectors drawn from covariance matrix $\bf \Sigma$. We provide $\textit{global}$ convergence for Oja's algorithm which is popularly used in practice but lacks theoretical understanding for $k>1$. We also provide a modified variant $\mathsf{Oja}^{++}$ that runs $\textit{even faster}$ than Oja's. Our results match the information theoretic lower bound in terms of dependency on error, on eigengap, on rank $k$, and on dimension $d$, up to poly-log factors. In addition, our convergence rate can be made gap-free, that is proportional to the approximation error and independent of the eigengap. In contrast, for general rank $k$, before our work (1) it was open to design any algorithm with efficient global convergence rate; and (2) it was open to design any algorithm with (even local) gap-free convergence rate in $O(dk)$ space.
  • We develop several efficient algorithms for the classical \emph{Matrix Scaling} problem, which is used in many diverse areas, from preconditioning linear systems to approximation of the permanent. On an input $n\times n$ matrix $A$, this problem asks to find diagonal (scaling) matrices $X$ and $Y$ (if they exist), so that $X A Y$ $\varepsilon$-approximates a doubly stochastic, or more generally a matrix with prescribed row and column sums. We address the general scaling problem as well as some important special cases. In particular, if $A$ has $m$ nonzero entries, and if there exist $X$ and $Y$ with polynomially large entries such that $X A Y$ is doubly stochastic, then we can solve the problem in total complexity $\tilde{O}(m + n^{4/3})$. This greatly improves on the best known previous results, which were either $\tilde{O}(n^4)$ or $O(m n^{1/2}/\varepsilon)$. Our algorithms are based on tailor-made first and second order techniques, combined with other recent advances in continuous optimization, which may be of independent interest for solving similar problems.
  • We study $k$-SVD that is to obtain the first $k$ singular vectors of a matrix $A$. Recently, a few breakthroughs have been discovered on $k$-SVD: Musco and Musco [1] proved the first gap-free convergence result using the block Krylov method, Shamir [2] discovered the first variance-reduction stochastic method, and Bhojanapalli et al. [3] provided the fastest $O(\mathsf{nnz}(A) + \mathsf{poly}(1/\varepsilon))$-time algorithm using alternating minimization. In this paper, we put forward a new and simple LazySVD framework to improve the above breakthroughs. This framework leads to a faster gap-free method outperforming [1], and the first accelerated and stochastic method outperforming [2]. In the $O(\mathsf{nnz}(A) + \mathsf{poly}(1/\varepsilon))$ running-time regime, LazySVD outperforms [3] in certain parameter regimes without even using alternating minimization.
  • Many applications require recovering a ground truth low-rank matrix from noisy observations of the entries, which in practice is typically formulated as a weighted low-rank approximation problem and solved by non-convex optimization heuristics such as alternating minimization. In this paper, we provide provable recovery guarantee of weighted low-rank via a simple alternating minimization algorithm. In particular, for a natural class of matrices and weights and without any assumption on the noise, we bound the spectral norm of the difference between the recovered matrix and the ground truth, by the spectral norm of the weighted noise plus an additive error that decreases exponentially with the number of rounds of alternating minimization, from either initialization by SVD or, more importantly, random initialization. These provide the first theoretical results for weighted low-rank via alternating minimization with non-binary deterministic weights, significantly generalizing those for matrix completion, the special case with binary weights, since our assumptions are similar or weaker than those made in existing works. Furthermore, this is achieved by a very simple algorithm that improves the vanilla alternating minimization with a simple clipping step. The key technical challenge is that under non-binary deterministic weights, na\"ive alternating steps will destroy the incoherence and spectral properties of the intermediate solutions, which are needed for making progress towards the ground truth. We show that the properties only need to hold in an average sense and can be achieved by the clipping step. We further provide an alternating algorithm that uses a whitening step that keeps the properties via SDP and Rademacher rounding and thus requires weaker assumptions. This technique can potentially be applied in some other applications and is of independent interest.
  • We study $k$-GenEV, the problem of finding the top $k$ generalized eigenvectors, and $k$-CCA, the problem of finding the top $k$ vectors in canonical-correlation analysis. We propose algorithms $\mathtt{LazyEV}$ and $\mathtt{LazyCCA}$ to solve the two problems with running times linearly dependent on the input size and on $k$. Furthermore, our algorithms are DOUBLY-ACCELERATED: our running times depend only on the square root of the matrix condition number, and on the square root of the eigengap. This is the first such result for both $k$-GenEV or $k$-CCA. We also provide the first gap-free results, which provide running times that depend on $1/\sqrt{\varepsilon}$ rather than the eigengap.
  • Non-negative matrix factorization is a popular tool for decomposing data into feature and weight matrices under non-negativity constraints. It enjoys practical success but is poorly understood theoretically. This paper proposes an algorithm that alternates between decoding the weights and updating the features, and shows that assuming a generative model of the data, it provably recovers the ground-truth under fairly mild conditions. In particular, its only essential requirement on features is linear independence. Furthermore, the algorithm uses ReLU to exploit the non-negativity for decoding the weights, and thus can tolerate adversarial noise that can potentially be as large as the signal, and can tolerate unbiased noise much larger than the signal. The analysis relies on a carefully designed coupling between two potential functions, which we believe is of independent interest.
  • Semantic word embeddings represent the meaning of a word via a vector, and are created by diverse methods. Many use nonlinear operations on co-occurrence statistics, and have hand-tuned hyperparameters and reweighting methods. This paper proposes a new generative model, a dynamic version of the log-linear topic model of~\citet{mnih2007three}. The methodological novelty is to use the prior to compute closed form expressions for word statistics. This provides a theoretical justification for nonlinear models like PMI, word2vec, and GloVe, as well as some hyperparameter choices. It also helps explain why low-dimensional semantic embeddings contain linear algebraic structure that allows solution of word analogies, as shown by~\citet{mikolov2013efficient} and many subsequent papers. Experimental support is provided for the generative model assumptions, the most important of which is that latent word vectors are fairly uniformly dispersed in space.
  • The well known maximum-entropy principle due to Jaynes, which states that given mean parameters, the maximum entropy distribution matching them is in an exponential family, has been very popular in machine learning due to its "Occam's razor" interpretation. Unfortunately, calculating the potentials in the maximum-entropy distribution is intractable \cite{bresler2014hardness}. We provide computationally efficient versions of this principle when the mean parameters are pairwise moments: we design distributions that approximately match given pairwise moments, while having entropy which is comparable to the maximum entropy distribution matching those moments. We additionally provide surprising applications of the approximate maximum entropy principle to designing provable variational methods for partition function calculations for Ising models without any assumptions on the potentials of the model. More precisely, we show that in every temperature, we can get approximation guarantees for the log-partition function comparable to those in the low-temperature limit, which is the setting of optimization of quadratic forms over the hypercube. \cite{alon2006approximating}
  • We consider the problem of online convex optimization against an arbitrary adversary with bandit feedback, known as bandit convex optimization. We give the first $\tilde{O}(\sqrt{T})$-regret algorithm for this setting based on a novel application of the ellipsoid method to online learning. This bound is known to be tight up to logarithmic factors. Our analysis introduces new tools in discrete convex geometry.
  • Analysis of sample survey data often requires adjustments to account for missing data in the outcome variables of principal interest. Standard adjustment methods based on item imputation or on propensity weighting factors rely heavily on the availability of auxiliary variables for both responding and non-responding units. Application of these adjustment methods can be especially challenging in cases for which the auxiliary variables are numerous and are themselves subject to substantial incomplete-data problems. This paper shows how classification and regression trees and forests can overcome some of the computational difficulties. An in-depth simulation study based on incomplete-data patterns encountered in the U.S. Consumer Expenditure Survey is used to compare the methods with two standard methods for estimating a population mean in terms of bias, mean squared error, computational speed and number of variables that can be analyzed.
  • A central problem in ranking is to design a ranking measure for evaluation of ranking functions. In this paper we study, from a theoretical perspective, the widely used Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG)-type ranking measures. Although there are extensive empirical studies of NDCG, little is known about its theoretical properties. We first show that, whatever the ranking function is, the standard NDCG which adopts a logarithmic discount, converges to 1 as the number of items to rank goes to infinity. On the first sight, this result is very surprising. It seems to imply that NDCG cannot differentiate good and bad ranking functions, contradicting to the empirical success of NDCG in many applications. In order to have a deeper understanding of ranking measures in general, we propose a notion referred to as consistent distinguishability. This notion captures the intuition that a ranking measure should have such a property: For every pair of substantially different ranking functions, the ranking measure can decide which one is better in a consistent manner on almost all datasets. We show that NDCG with logarithmic discount has consistent distinguishability although it converges to the same limit for all ranking functions. We next characterize the set of all feasible discount functions for NDCG according to the concept of consistent distinguishability. Specifically we show that whether NDCG has consistent distinguishability depends on how fast the discount decays, and 1/r is a critical point. We then turn to the cut-off version of NDCG, i.e., NDCG@k. We analyze the distinguishability of NDCG@k for various choices of k and the discount functions. Experimental results on real Web search datasets agree well with the theory.