• COnstraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) provides a molecular mechanistic framework for integrative analysis of experimental data and quantitative prediction of physicochemically and biochemically feasible phenotypic states. The COBRA Toolbox is a comprehensive software suite of interoperable COBRA methods. It has found widespread applications in biology, biomedicine, and biotechnology because its functions can be flexibly combined to implement tailored COBRA protocols for any biochemical network. Version 3.0 includes new methods for quality controlled reconstruction, modelling, topological analysis, strain and experimental design, network visualisation as well as network integration of chemoinformatic, metabolomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and thermochemical data. New multi-lingual code integration also enables an expansion in COBRA application scope via high-precision, high-performance, and nonlinear numerical optimisation solvers for multi-scale, multi-cellular and reaction kinetic modelling, respectively. This protocol can be adapted for the generation and analysis of a constraint-based model in a wide variety of molecular systems biology scenarios. This protocol is an update to the COBRA Toolbox 1.0 and 2.0. The COBRA Toolbox 3.0 provides an unparalleled depth of constraint-based reconstruction and analysis methods.
  • We propose a fast proximal Newton-type algorithm for minimizing regularized finite sums that returns an $\epsilon$-suboptimal point in $\tilde{\mathcal{O}}(d(n + \sqrt{\kappa d})\log(\frac{1}{\epsilon}))$ FLOPS, where $n$ is number of samples, $d$ is feature dimension, and $\kappa$ is the condition number. As long as $n > d$, the proposed method is more efficient than state-of-the-art accelerated stochastic first-order methods for non-smooth regularizers which requires $\tilde{\mathcal{O}}(d(n + \sqrt{\kappa n})\log(\frac{1}{\epsilon}))$ FLOPS. The key idea is to form the subsampled Newton subproblem in a way that preserves the finite sum structure of the objective, thereby allowing us to leverage recent developments in stochastic first-order methods to solve the subproblem. Experimental results verify that the proposed algorithm outperforms previous algorithms for $\ell_1$-regularized logistic regression on real datasets.
  • We identify conditional parity as a general notion of non-discrimination in machine learning. In fact, several recently proposed notions of non-discrimination, including a few counterfactual notions, are instances of conditional parity. We show that conditional parity is amenable to statistical analysis by studying randomization as a general mechanism for achieving conditional parity and a kernel-based test of conditional parity.
  • We develop a general approach to valid inference after model selection. At the core of our framework is a result that characterizes the distribution of a post-selection estimator conditioned on the selection event. We specialize the approach to model selection by the lasso to form valid confidence intervals for the selected coefficients and test whether all relevant variables have been included in the model.
  • Archetypal analysis and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) are staples in a statisticians toolbox for dimension reduction and exploratory data analysis. We describe a geometric approach to both NMF and archetypal analysis by interpreting both problems as finding extreme points of the data cloud. We also develop and analyze an efficient approach to finding extreme points in high dimensions. For modern massive datasets that are too large to fit on a single machine and must be stored in a distributed setting, our approach makes only a small number of passes over the data. In fact, it is possible to obtain the NMF or perform archetypal analysis with just two passes over the data.
  • We devise a one-shot approach to distributed sparse regression in the high-dimensional setting. The key idea is to average "debiased" or "desparsified" lasso estimators. We show the approach converges at the same rate as the lasso as long as the dataset is not split across too many machines. We also extend the approach to generalized linear models.
  • Regularized M-estimators are used in diverse areas of science and engineering to fit high-dimensional models with some low-dimensional structure. Usually the low-dimensional structure is encoded by the presence of the (unknown) parameters in some low-dimensional model subspace. In such settings, it is desirable for estimates of the model parameters to be \emph{model selection consistent}: the estimates also fall in the model subspace. We develop a general framework for establishing consistency and model selection consistency of regularized M-estimators and show how it applies to some special cases of interest in statistical learning. Our analysis identifies two key properties of regularized M-estimators, referred to as geometric decomposability and irrepresentability, that ensure the estimators are consistent and model selection consistent.
  • We consider a discriminative learning (regression) problem, whereby the regression function is a convex combination of k linear classifiers. Existing approaches are based on the EM algorithm, or similar techniques, without provable guarantees. We develop a simple method based on spectral techniques and a `mirroring' trick, that discovers the subspace spanned by the classifiers' parameter vectors. Under a probabilistic assumption on the feature vector distribution, we prove that this approach has nearly optimal statistical efficiency.
  • We generalize Newton-type methods for minimizing smooth functions to handle a sum of two convex functions: a smooth function and a nonsmooth function with a simple proximal mapping. We show that the resulting proximal Newton-type methods inherit the desirable convergence behavior of Newton-type methods for minimizing smooth functions, even when search directions are computed inexactly. Many popular methods tailored to problems arising in bioinformatics, signal processing, and statistical learning are special cases of proximal Newton-type methods, and our analysis yields new convergence results for some of these methods.
  • Two-step estimators often called upon to fit censored regression models in many areas of science and engineering. Since censoring incurs a bias in the naive least-squares fit, a two-step estimator first estimates the bias and then fits a corrected linear model. We develop a framework for performing valid /post-correction inference/ with two-step estimators. By exploiting recent results on post-selection inference, we obtain valid confidence intervals and significance tests for the fitted coefficients.