• Intensity mapping provides a unique means to probe the epoch of reionization (EoR), when the neutral intergalactic medium was ionized by the energetic photons emitted from the first galaxies. The [CII] 158$\mu$m fine-structure line is typically one of the brightest emission lines of star-forming galaxies and thus a promising tracer of the global EoR star-formation activity. However, [CII] intensity maps at $6 \lesssim z \lesssim 8$ are contaminated by interloping CO rotational line emission ($3 \leq J_{\rm upp} \leq 6$) from lower-redshift galaxies. Here we present a strategy to remove the foreground contamination in upcoming [CII] intensity mapping experiments, guided by a model of CO emission from foreground galaxies. The model is based on empirical measurements of the mean and scatter of the total infrared luminosities of galaxies at $z < 3$ and with stellar masses $M_{*} > 10^{8}\,\rm M_{\rm \odot}$ selected in $K$-band from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA survey, which can be converted to CO line strengths. For a mock field of the Tomographic Ionized-carbon Mapping Experiment (TIME), we find that masking out the "voxels" (spectral-spatial elements) containing foreground galaxies identified using an optimized CO flux threshold results in a $z$-dependent criterion $m^{\rm AB}_{\rm K} \lesssim 22$ (or $M_{*} \gtrsim 10^{9} \,\rm M_{\rm \odot}$) at $z < 1$ and makes a [CII]/CO$_{\rm tot}$ power ratio of $\gtrsim 10$ at $k=0.1$ $h$/Mpc achievable, at the cost of a moderate $\lesssim 8\%$ loss of total survey volume.
  • Following the first two annual intensity mapping workshops at Stanford in March 2016 and Johns Hopkins in June 2017, we report on the recent advances in theory, instrumentation and observation that were presented in these meetings and some of the opportunities and challenges that were identified looking forward. With preliminary detections of CO, [CII], Lya and low-redshift 21cm, and a host of experiments set to go online in the next few years, the field is rapidly progressing on all fronts, with great anticipation for a flood of new exciting results. This current snapshot provides an efficient reference for experts in related fields and a useful resource for nonspecialists. We begin by introducing the concept of line-intensity mapping and then discuss the broad array of science goals that will be enabled, ranging from the history of star formation, reionization and galaxy evolution to measuring baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshift and constraining theories of dark matter, modified gravity and dark energy. After reviewing the first detections reported to date, we survey the experimental landscape, presenting the parameters and capabilities of relevant instruments such as COMAP, mmIMe, AIM-CO, CCAT-p, TIME, CONCERTO, CHIME, HIRAX, HERA, STARFIRE, MeerKAT/SKA and SPHEREx. Finally, we describe recent theoretical advances: different approaches to modeling line luminosity functions, several techniques to separate the desired signal from foregrounds, statistical methods to analyze the data, and frameworks to generate realistic intensity map simulations.
  • Spectral line intensity mapping has been proposed as a promising tool to efficiently probe the cosmic reionization and the large-scale structure. Without detecting individual sources, line intensity mapping makes use of all available photons and measures the integrated light in the source confusion limit, to efficiently map the three-dimensional matter distribution on large scales as traced by a given emission line. One particular challenge is the separation of desired signals from astrophysical continuum foregrounds and line interlopers. Here we present a technique to extract large-scale structure information traced by emission lines from different redshifts, embedded in a three-dimensional intensity mapping data cube. The line redshifts are distinguished by the anisotropic shape of the power spectra when projected onto a common coordinate frame. We consider the case where high-redshift [CII] lines are confused with multiple low-redshift CO rotational lines. We present a semi-analytic model for [CII] and CO line estimates based on the cosmic infrared background measurements, and show that with a modest instrumental noise level and survey geometry, the large-scale [CII] and CO power spectrum amplitudes can be successfully extracted from a confusion-limited data set, without external information. We discuss the implications and limits of this technique for possible line intensity mapping experiments.