• A single atomic slice of {\alpha}-tin-stanene-has been predicted to host quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature, offering an ideal platform to study low-dimensional and topological physics. While recent research has intensively focused on monolayer stanene, the quantum size effect in few-layer stanene could profoundly change material properties, but remains unexplored. By exploring the layer degree of freedom, we unexpectedly discover superconductivity in few-layer stanene down to a bilayer grown on PbTe, while bulk {\alpha}-tin is not superconductive. Through substrate engineering, we further realize a transition from a single-band to a two-band superconductor with a doubling of the transition temperature. In-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) together with first-principles calculations elucidate the corresponding band structure. Interestingly, the theory also indicates the existence of a topologically nontrivial band. Our experimental findings open up novel strategies for constructing two-dimensional topological superconductors.
  • We report transport studies of Mn-doped Bi2Te3 topological insulator (TI) films with accurately controlled thickness grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that films thicker than 5 quintuple-layer (QL) exhibit the usual anomalous Hall effect for magnetic TIs. When the thickness is reduced to 4 QL, however, characteristic features associated with the topological Hall effect (THE) emerge. More surprisingly, the THE vanishes again when the film thickness is further reduced to 3 QL. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that the coupling between the top and bottom surface states at the dimensional crossover regime stabilizes the magnetic skyrmion structure that is responsible for the THE.
  • Semimetallic tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) displays an extremely large non-saturating magnetoresistance (XMR), which is the subject of intense interest. This phenomenon is thought to arise from the combination of perfect n-p charge compensation with low carrier densities in WTe2 and presumably details of its band structure. Recently, "spin texture" induced by strong spin-orbital coupling (SOC) has been observed in WTe2 by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This provides a mechanism for protecting backscattering for the states involved and thus was proposed to play an important role in the XMR of WTe2. Here, based on our density functional calculations for bulk WTe2, we found a strong Rashba spin-orbit effect in the calculated band structure due to its non-centrosymmetric structure. This splits bands and two-fold spin degeneracy of bands is lifted. A prominent Umklapp interference pattern (a spectroscopic feature with involving reciprocal lattice vectors) can be observed by scanning tunneling microscopic (STM) measurements on WTe2 surface at 4.2 K. This differs distinctly from the surface atomic structure demonstrated at 77 K. The energy dependence of Umklapp interference shows a strong correspondence with densities of states integrated from ARPES measurement, manifesting a fact that the bands are spin-split on the opposites side of Gamma point. Spectroscopic survey reveals the ratio of electron/hole asymmetry changes alternately with lateral locations along b axis, providing a microscopic picture for double-carrier transport of semimetallic WTe2. The calculated band structure and Fermi surface is further supported by our ARPES results and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations measurements.
  • We report the superconductivity evolution of one unit cell (1-UC) and 2-UC FeSe films on SrTiO3(001) substrates with potassium (K) adsorption. By in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurement, we find that the superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe films is continuously suppressed with increasing K coverage, whereas non-superconducting 2-UC FeSe films become superconducting with a gap of ~17 meV or ~11 meV depending on whether the underlying 1-UC films are superconducting or not. This work explicitly reveals that the interface electron-phonon coupling is strongly related to the charge transfer at FeSe/STO interface and plays vital role in enhancing Cooper pairing in both 1-UC and 2-UC FeSe films.
  • The surface of a topological crystalline insulator (TCI) carries an even number of Dirac cones protected by crystalline symmetry. We epitaxially grew high quality Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_x$Te(111) films and investigated the TCI phase by in-situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_x$Te(111) films undergo a topological phase transition from trivial insulator to TCI via increasing the Sn/Pb ratio, accompanied by a crossover from n-type to p-type doping. In addition, a hybridization gap is opened in the surface states when the thickness of film is reduced to the two-dimensional limit. The work demonstrates an approach to manipulating the topological properties of TCI, which is of importance for future fundamental research and applications based on TCI.