• In this paper, we present direct mass measurements of neutron-rich $^{86}$Kr projectile fragments conducted at the HIRFL-CSR facility in Lanzhou by employing the Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) method. The new mass excesses of $^{52-54}$Sc nuclides are determined to be -40492(82), -38928(114), -34654(540) keV, which show a significant increase of binding energy compared to the reported ones in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012 (AME12). In particular, $^{53}$Sc and $^{54}$Sc are more bound by 0.8 MeV and 1.0 MeV, respectively. The behavior of the two neutron separation energy with neutron numbers indicates a strong sub-shell closure at neutron number $N$ = 32 in Sc isotopes.
  • A new Digital Pulse Processing (DPP) system, based on domino ring sampler version 4 (DRS4), with good time resolution for the LaBr3 detectors has been developed and different digital timing analysis methods for processing the detector raw signals are reported. The system, composed of an eight channels DRS4 chip, was used as the readout electronic and acquisition system to process the outputs signals from XP20D0 Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). The PMTs were coupled with LaBr3 scintillator and placed on opposite side of the radioactive positron 22Na source for 511keV gama-ray test. By analyzing the raw data acquired by the system, the best coincidence timing resolution is about 194.7ps (FWHM), obtained by the digital constant fraction discrimination (dCFD) method and better than the other digital methods and analysis method based on the conventional analog systems. The results indicate that it is a promising approach to better localize the positron annihilation in the positron emission tomography (PET) with time of flight (TOF) and they are also suitable for the scintillation timing measurement, such as in TOF-DeltaE and TOF-E systems for particle identification, with picosecond accuracy timing measurement. Furthermore, this system is more simple and convenient in comparison with other systems.
  • A new Digital Pulse Processing (DPP) module has been developed, based on a domino ring sampler version 4 chip (DRS4), with good time resolution for LaBr3 detectors, and different digital timing analysis methods for processing the raw detector signals are reported. The module, composed of an eight channel DRS4 chip, was used as the readout electronic and acquisition system to process the output signals from XP20D0 Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). Two PMTs were coupled with LaBr3 scintillator and placed face to face on both sides of a radioactive positron 22Na source for 511 keV gama ray tests. By analyzing the raw data acquired by the module, the best coincidence timing resolution is about 194.7 ps (FWHM), obtained by the digital constant fraction discrimination (dCFD) method, which is better than other digital methods and analysis methods based on conventional analog systems which have been tested. The results indicate that it is a promising approach to better localize the positron annihilation in positron emission tomography (PET) with time of flight (TOF), as well as for scintillation timing measurement, such as in TOF-DeltaE and TOF-E systems for particle identification, with picosecond accuracy timing measurement. Furthermore, this module is more simple and convenient than other systems.
  • Carbon ion therapy have the ability to overcome the limitation of convertional radiotherapy due to its most energy deposition in selective depth, usually called Bragg peak, which results in increased biological effectiness. During carbon ion therapy, lots positron emitters such as $^{11}$C, $^{15}$O, $^{10}$C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions. Immediately after patient irradiation, PET scanners can be used to measure the spatial distribution of positron emitters, which can track the carbon beam to the tissue. In this study, we designed and evaluated an dual-plate in-room PET scanner to monitor patient dose in carbon ion therapy, which is based on GATE simulation platform. A dual-plate PET is designed to avoid interference with the carbon beam line and with patient positioning. Its performance was compared with that of four-head and full-ring PET scanners. The dual-plate, four-head and full-ring PET scanners consisted of 30, 60, 60 detector modules, respectively, with a 36 cm distance between directly opposite detector modules for dose deposition measurements. Each detector module was consisted of a 24$\times$24 array of 2$\times2\times$18 mm$^{3}$ LYSO pixels coupled to a Hamamatsu H8500 PMT. To esitmate the production yield of positron emitters, a 10$\times15\times$15 cm$^{3}$ cuboid PMMA phantom was irradiated with 172, 200, 250 AMeV $^{12}$C beams. 3D images of the activity distribution of the three type scanners are produced by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. By comparing the longitudinal profile of positron emitters, measured along the carbon beam path, we concluded that the development of a dual-plate PET scanner is feasible to monitor the dose distribution for carbon ion therapy.
  • Monte Carlo simulation plays an important role in the study of time of flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) prototype. As it can incorporate accurate physical modeling of scintillation detection process, from scintillation light generation, the transport of scintillation photos through the crystal(s), to the conversion of these photons into electronic signals. The Geant4 based simulation software GATE can provide a user-friendly simulation platform containing the properties needed. In this work, we developed a dedicated module in GATE simulation tool. Using this module, we simulated the light yield, energy resolution, time resolution of LYSO pixels with the same cross-section ($4\times4 mm^{2}$) of different lengths: 5 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm, 20 mm, 25 mm, coupled to a PMT. The experiments were performed to validate the GATE simulation results. The results indicate that the best time resolution (484.0$\pm$67.5 ps) and energy resolution (13.3$\pm$0.4 %) could be produced by using pixel with length of 5 mm. The module can also be applied to other cases for precisely simulating optical photons propagating in scintillators.