• Combining deep neural networks with structured logic rules is desirable to harness flexibility and reduce uninterpretability of the neural models. We propose a general framework capable of enhancing various types of neural networks (e.g., CNNs and RNNs) with declarative first-order logic rules. Specifically, we develop an iterative distillation method that transfers the structured information of logic rules into the weights of neural networks. We deploy the framework on a CNN for sentiment analysis, and an RNN for named entity recognition. With a few highly intuitive rules, we obtain substantial improvements and achieve state-of-the-art or comparable results to previous best-performing systems.
  • This paper presents a Kernel Entity Salience Model (KESM) that improves text understanding and retrieval by better estimating entity salience (importance) in documents. KESM represents entities by knowledge enriched distributed representations, models the interactions between entities and words by kernels, and combines the kernel scores to estimate entity salience. The whole model is learned end-to-end using entity salience labels. The salience model also improves ad hoc search accuracy, providing effective ranking features by modeling the salience of query entities in candidate documents. Our experiments on two entity salience corpora and two TREC ad hoc search datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of KESM over frequency-based and feature-based methods. We also provide examples showing how KESM conveys its text understanding ability learned from entity salience to search.
  • Coreference resolution is one of the first stages in deep language understanding and its importance has been well recognized in the natural language processing community. In this paper, we propose a generative, unsupervised ranking model for entity coreference resolution by introducing resolution mode variables. Our unsupervised system achieves 58.44% F1 score of the CoNLL metric on the English data from the CoNLL-2012 shared task (Pradhan et al., 2012), outperforming the Stanford deterministic system (Lee et al., 2013) by 3.01%.