• Topological semimetal, a novel state of quantum matter hosting exotic emergent quantum phenomena dictated by the non-trivial band topology, has emerged as a new frontier in condensed-matter physics. Very recently, a coexistence of triply degenerate points of band crossing and Weyl points near the Fermi level was theoretically predicted and immediately experimentally verified in single crystalline molybdenum phosphide (MoP). Here we show in this material the high-pressure electronic transport and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We report the emergence of pressure-induced superconductivity in MoP with a critical temperature Tc of about 2 K at 27.6 GPa, rising to 3.7 K at the highest pressure of 95.0 GPa studied. No structural phase transitions is detected up to 60.6 GPa from the XRD. Meanwhile, the Weyl points and triply degenerate points topologically protected by the crystal symmetry are retained at high pressure as revealed by our DFT calculations. The coexistence of three-component fermion and superconductivity in heavily pressurized MoP offers an excellent platform to study the interplay between topological phase of matter and superconductivity.
  • As a new type of topological materials, ZrTe5 shows many exotic properties under extreme conditions. Utilizing resistance and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements under high pressure, while the resistance anomaly near 128 K is completely suppressed at 6.2 GPa, a fully superconducting transition emerges surprisingly. The superconducting transition temperature Tc increases with applied pressure, and reaches a maximum of 4.0 K at 14.6 GPa, followed by a slight drop but remaining almost constant value up to 68.5 GPa. At pressures above 21.2 GPa, a second superconducting phase with the maximum Tc of about 6.0 K appears and coexists with the original one to the maximum pressure studied in this work. In situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy combined with theoretical calculations indicate the observed two-stage superconducting behavior is correlated to the structural phase transition from ambient Cmcm phase to high-pressure C2/m phase around 6 GPa, and to a mixture of two high-pressure phases of C2/m and P-1 above 20 GPa. The combination of structure, transport measurement and theoretical calculations enable a complete understanding of the emerging exotic properties in three-dimensional topological materials happened under extreme environments.
  • The phase diagram of H2O is extremely complex, in particular, it is believed that a second critical point exists deep below the supercooled water (SCW) region where two liquids of different densities coexist. The problem however, is that SCW freezes at temperatures just above this hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) so direct experimental verification of its existence has yet to be realized. Here, we report two anomalies in the complex dielectric constant during warming in the form of a peak anomaly near Tp=203 K and a sharp minimum near Tm=212 K from ice samples prepared from SCW under hydrostatic pressures up to 760 MPa. The same features were observed about 4 K higher in heavy ice. Tp is believed to be associated to the nucleation process of metastable cubic ice Ic and Tm the transitioning of ice Ic to either ices Ih or II depending on pressure. Given that Tp and Tm are nearly isothermal and present up to at least 620 MPa and ending as a critical point near 33-50 MPa, it is deduced that two types of SCW with different density concentrations exists which affects the surface energy of ice Ic nuclei in the "no man's land" region of the phase diagram. Our results are consistent with the LLCP theory and suggest that a metastable critical point exists in the region of 33-50 MPa and Tc > 212 K.
  • Tungsten ditelluride has attracted intense research interest due to the recent discovery of its large unsaturated magnetoresistance up to 60 Tesla. Motivated by the presence of a small, sensitive Fermi surface of 5d electronic orbitals, we boost the electronic properties by applying a high pressure, and introduce superconductivity successfully. Superconductivity sharply appears at a pressure of 2.5 GPa, rapidly reaching a maximum critical temperature (Tc) of 7 K at around 16.8 GPa, followed by a monotonic decrease in Tc with increasing pressure, thereby exhibiting the typical dome-shaped superconducting phase. From theoretical calculations, we interpret the low-pressure region of the superconducting dome to an enrichment of the density of states at the Fermi level and attribute the high-pressure decrease in Tc to possible structural instability. Thus, Tungsten ditelluride may provide a new platform for our understanding of superconductivity phenomena in transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • Superconductivity commonly appears under pressure in charge density wave (CDW)-bearing transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), but has emerged so far only via either intercalation with electron donors or electrostatic doping in CDW-free TMDs. Theoretical calculations have predicted that the latter should be metallized through bandgap closure under pressure, but superconductivity remained elusive in pristine 2H-MoS2 upon substantial compression, where a pressure of up to 60 GPa only evidenced the metallic state. Here we report the emergence of superconductivity in pristine 2H-MoS2 at 90 GPa. The maximum onset transition temperature Tc(onset) of 11.5 K, the highest value among TMDs and nearly constant from 120 up to 200 GPa, is well above that obtained by chemical doping but comparable to that obtained by electrostatic doping. Tc(onset) is more than an order of magnitude larger than present theoretical expectations, raising questions on either the current calculation methodologies or the mechanism of the pressure-induced pairing state. Our findings strongly suggest further experimental and theoretical efforts directed toward the study of the pressure-induced superconductivity in all CDW-free TMDs.
  • From high precision measurements of the complex dielectric constant of H2O ice, we identify the critical temperatures of the phase transition into and out of ice XI from ice Ih to occur at T_Ih-IX=58.9 K and T_IX-Ih=73.4 K. For D2O, T_Ih-IX=63.7 K and T_IX-Ih=78.2 K. A triple point is identified to exist at 0.07 GPa and 73.4 K for H2O and 0.08 GPa and 78.2 K for D2O where ices Ih, II and XI coexist. A first order phase transition with kinetic broadening associated to proton ordering dynamics is identified at 100 K.