• Two-dimensional layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) materials often exhibit exotic quantum matter phases due to the delicate coupling and competitions between the charge, lattice, orbital, and spin degrees of freedom. Surprisingly, we here present, based on first-principles density-functional theory calculations, the incorporation of all such degrees of freedom in a charge density wave (CDW) of monolayer (ML) TMDC 1$T$-TaS$_2$. We reveal that the CDW formed via the electron-phonon coupling is significantly stabilized by the orbital hybridization. The resulting lattice distortion to the "David-star" superstructure constituted of one cental, six nearest-neighbor, and six next-nearest-neighbor Ta atoms is accompanied by the formation of quasimolecular orbitals due to a strong hybridization of the Ta $t_{\rm 2g}$ orbitals. Furthermore, the flat band of the quasimolecular orbital at the Fermi level has a spin splitting caused by an intramolecular exchange, yielding a full spin polarization with a band-gap opening. Our finding of the intricate charge-lattice-orbital-spin coupling in ML 1$T$-TaS$_2$ provides a framework for the exploration of various CDW phases observed in few-layer or bulk 1$T$-TaS$_2$.
  • The graphene/MoS2 heterojunction formed by joining the two components laterally in a single plane promises to exhibit a low-resistance contact according to the Schottky-Mott rule. Here we provide an atomic-scale description of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of this type of junction. We first identify the energetically favorable structures in which the preference of forming C-S or C-Mo bonds at the boundary depends on the chemical conditions. We find that significant charge transfer between graphene and MoS2 is localized at the boundary. We show that the abundant 1D boundary states substantially pin the Fermi level in the lateral contact between graphene and MoS2, in close analogy to the effect of 2D interfacial states in the contacts between 3D materials. Furthermore, we propose specific ways in which these effects can be exploited to achieve spin-polarized currents.
  • Contemporary science is witnessing a rapid expansion of the two-dimensional (2D) materials family, each member possessing intriguing emergent properties of fundamental and practical importance. Using the particle-swarm optimization method in combination with first-principles density functional theory calculations, here wepredict a new category of 2D monolayers named tellurene, composed of the metalloid element Te, with stable 1T-MoS2-like ( {\alpha}-Te), and metastable tetragonal (\b{eta}-Te) and 2H-MoS2-like ({\gamma}-Te) structures. The underlying formation mechanism of such tri-layer arrangements is uniquely rooted in the multivalent nature of Te, with the central-layer Te behaving more metal-like (e.g., Mo), and the two outer layers more semiconductor-like (e.g.,S). In particular, the {\alpha}-Te phase can be spontaneously obtained from the magic thicknesses truncated along the [001] direction of the trigonal structure of bulk Te. Furthermore, both the {\alpha}- and \b{eta}-Te phases possess electron and hole mobilities much higher than MoS2, as well as salient optical absorption properties. These findings effectively extend the realm of 2D materials to group-VI monolayers, and provide a new and generic formation mechanism for designing 2D materials.
  • Beryllium is a simple alkali earth metal, but has been the target of intensive studies for decades because of its unusual electron behaviors at surfaces. Puzzling aspects include (i) severe deviations from the description of the nearly free electron picture, (ii) anomalously large electron-phonon coupling effect, and (iii) giant Friedal oscillations. The underlying origins for such anomalous surface electron behaviors have been under active debate, but with no consensus. Here, by means of first-principle calculations, we discover that this pure metal system, surprisingly, harbors the Dirac node line (DNL) that in turn helps to rationalize many of the existing puzzles. The DNL is featured by a closed line consisting of linear band crossings and its induced topological surface band agrees well with previous photoemission spectroscopy observation on Be (0001) surface. We further reveal that each of the elemental alakali earth metals of Mg, Ca, and Sr also harbors the DNL, and speculate that the fascinating topological property of DNL might naturally exist in other elemental metals as well.
  • Using first-principles calculations and Boltzmann theory, we explore the feasibility to maximize the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of topological insulator Bi2Te3 films in the few-quintuple layer regime. We discover that the delicate competitions between the surface and bulk contributions, coupled with the overall quantum size effects, lead to a novel and generic non-monotonous dependence of ZT on the film thickness. In particular, when the system crosses into the topologically non-trivial regime upon increasing the film thickness, the much longer surface relaxation time associated with the robust nature of the topological surface states results in a maximal ZT value, which can be further optimized to ~2.0 under physically realistic conditions. We also reveal the appealing potential of bridging the long-standing ZT asymmetry of p- and n-type Bi2Te3 systems.
  • Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides represent an emerging class of materials exhibiting various intriguing properties, and integration of such materials for potential device applications will necessarily encounter creation of different boundaries. Using first-principles approaches, here we investigate the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties along two inequivalent zigzag M and X edges of MX$_{2}$ (M=Mo, W; X=S, Se). Along the M edges, we reveal a previously unrecognized but energetically strongly preferred (2x1) reconstruction pattern, which is universally operative for all the MX$_{2}$, characterized by a self-passivation mechanism through place exchanges of the outmost X and M edge atoms. In contrast, the X edges undergo a more moderate (2x1) or (3x1) reconstruction for MoX$_{2}$ or WX$_{2}$, respectively. We further use the prototypical zigzag MoX$_{2}$ nanoribbons to demonstrate that the M and X edges possess distinctly different electronic and magnetic properties, which are discussed for spintronic and catalytic applications.
  • Based on the density functional theory with hybrid functional approach, we have studied the structural and thermodynamic stabilities of Cu2MSnX4 (M = Zn, Mg, and Ca; X = S and Se) alloy, and have further investigated the electronic and optical properties of stable Cu2MgSnS4 and Cu2MgSnSe4 phases. Thermal stability analysis indicates that Cu2MgSnS4 and Cu2MgSnSe4 are thermodynamically stable, while Cu2CaSnS4 and Cu2CaSnSe4 are unstable. The ground state configuration of the compound changes from kesterite into stannite structure when Zn atoms are substitued by larger Mg or Ca atoms. An energy separation between stannite and kesterite phase similar to that of CZTS is observed. Calculated electronic structures and optical properties suggest that Cu2MgSnS4 and Cu2MgSnSe4 can be efficient photovoltaic materials.
  • Fengpeng An, Guangpeng An, Qi An, Vito Antonelli, Eric Baussan, John Beacom, Leonid Bezrukov, Simon Blyth, Riccardo Brugnera, Margherita Buizza Avanzini, Jose Busto, Anatael Cabrera, Hao Cai, Xiao Cai, Antonio Cammi, Guofu Cao, Jun Cao, Yun Chang, Shaomin Chen, Shenjian Chen, Yixue Chen, Davide Chiesa, Massimiliano Clemenza, Barbara Clerbaux, Janet Conrad, Davide D'Angelo, Herve De Kerret, Zhi Deng, Ziyan Deng, Yayun Ding, Zelimir Djurcic, Damien Dornic, Marcos Dracos, Olivier Drapier, Stefano Dusini, Stephen Dye, Timo Enqvist, Donghua Fan, Jian Fang, Laurent Favart, Richard Ford, Marianne Goger-Neff, Haonan Gan, Alberto Garfagnini, Marco Giammarchi, Maxim Gonchar, Guanghua Gong, Hui Gong, Michel Gonin, Marco Grassi, Christian Grewing, Mengyun Guan, Vic Guarino, Gang Guo, Wanlei Guo, Xin-Heng Guo, Caren Hagner, Ran Han, Miao He, Yuekun Heng, Yee Hsiung, Jun Hu, Shouyang Hu, Tao Hu, Hanxiong Huang, Xingtao Huang, Lei Huo, Ara Ioannisian, Manfred Jeitler, Xiangdong Ji, Xiaoshan Jiang, Cecile Jollet, Li Kang, Michael Karagounis, Narine Kazarian, Zinovy Krumshteyn, Andre Kruth, Pasi Kuusiniemi, Tobias Lachenmaier, Rupert Leitner, Chao Li, Jiaxing Li, Weidong Li, Weiguo Li, Xiaomei Li, Xiaonan Li, Yi Li, Yufeng Li, Zhi-Bing Li, Hao Liang, Guey-Lin Lin, Tao Lin, Yen-Hsun Lin, Jiajie Ling, Ivano Lippi, Dawei Liu, Hongbang Liu, Hu Liu, Jianglai Liu, Jianli Liu, Jinchang Liu, Qian Liu, Shubin Liu, Shulin Liu, Paolo Lombardi, Yongbing Long, Haoqi Lu, Jiashu Lu, Jingbin Lu, Junguang Lu, Bayarto Lubsandorzhiev, Livia Ludhova, Shu Luo, Vladimir Lyashuk, Randolph Mollenberg, Xubo Ma, Fabio Mantovani, Yajun Mao, Stefano M. Mari, William F. McDonough, Guang Meng, Anselmo Meregaglia, Emanuela Meroni, Mauro Mezzetto, Lino Miramonti, Thomas Mueller, Dmitry Naumov, Lothar Oberauer, Juan Pedro Ochoa-Ricoux, Alexander Olshevskiy, Fausto Ortica, Alessandro Paoloni, Haiping Peng, Jen-Chieh Peng, Ezio Previtali, Ming Qi, Sen Qian, Xin Qian, Yongzhong Qian, Zhonghua Qin, Georg Raffelt, Gioacchino Ranucci, Barbara Ricci, Markus Robens, Aldo Romani, Xiangdong Ruan, Xichao Ruan, Giuseppe Salamanna, Mike Shaevitz, Valery Sinev, Chiara Sirignano, Monica Sisti, Oleg Smirnov, Michael Soiron, Achim Stahl, Luca Stanco, Jochen Steinmann, Xilei Sun, Yongjie Sun, Dmitriy Taichenachev, Jian Tang, Igor Tkachev, Wladyslaw Trzaska, Stefan van Waasen, Cristina Volpe, Vit Vorobel, Lucia Votano, Chung-Hsiang Wang, Guoli Wang, Hao Wang, Meng Wang, Ruiguang Wang, Siguang Wang, Wei Wang, Yi Wang, Yi Wang, Yifang Wang, Zhe Wang, Zheng Wang, Zhigang Wang, Zhimin Wang, Wei Wei, Liangjian Wen, Christopher Wiebusch, Bjorn Wonsak, Qun Wu, Claudia-Elisabeth Wulz, Michael Wurm, Yufei Xi, Dongmei Xia, Yuguang Xie, Zhi-zhong Xing, Jilei Xu, Baojun Yan, Changgen Yang, Chaowen Yang, Guang Yang, Lei Yang, Yifan Yang, Yu Yao, Ugur Yegin, Frederic Yermia, Zhengyun You, Boxiang Yu, Chunxu Yu, Zeyuan Yu, Sandra Zavatarelli, Liang Zhan, Chao Zhang, Hong-Hao Zhang, Jiawen Zhang, Jingbo Zhang, Qingmin Zhang, Yu-Mei Zhang, Zhenyu Zhang, Zhenghua Zhao, Yangheng Zheng, Weili Zhong, Guorong Zhou, Jing Zhou, Li Zhou, Rong Zhou, Shun Zhou, Wenxiong Zhou, Xiang Zhou, Yeling Zhou, Yufeng Zhou, Jiaheng Zou
    Oct. 18, 2015 hep-ex, physics.ins-det
    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy as a primary physics goal. It is also capable of observing neutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, as well as exotic searches such as nucleon decays, dark matter, sterile neutrinos, etc. We present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. By detecting reactor antineutrinos from two power plants at 53-km distance, JUNO will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a 3-4 sigma significance with six years of running. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum will also lead to the precise determination of three out of the six oscillation parameters to an accuracy of better than 1\%. Neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at 10 kpc would lead to ~5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ~2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton elastic scattering events in JUNO. Detection of DSNB would provide valuable information on the cosmic star-formation rate and the average core-collapsed neutrino energy spectrum. Geo-neutrinos can be detected in JUNO with a rate of ~400 events per year, significantly improving the statistics of existing geoneutrino samples. The JUNO detector is sensitive to several exotic searches, e.g. proton decay via the $p\to K^++\bar\nu$ decay channel. The JUNO detector will provide a unique facility to address many outstanding crucial questions in particle and astrophysics. It holds the great potential for further advancing our quest to understanding the fundamental properties of neutrinos, one of the building blocks of our Universe.
  • The recently discovered (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe superconductor provides a new platform for exploiting the microscopic mechanisms of high-$T_c$ superconductivity in FeSe-derived systems. Using density functional theory calculations, we first show that substitution of Li by Fe not only significantly strengthens the attraction between the (Li$_{0.8}$Fe$_{0.2}$)OH spacing layers and the FeSe superconducting layers along the \emph{c} axis, but also minimizes the lattice mismatch between the two in the \emph{ab} plane, both favorable for stabilizing the overall structure. Next we explore the electron injection into FeSe from the spacing layers, and unambiguously identify the Fe$_{0.2}$ components to be the dominant atomic origin of the dramatically enhanced interlayer charge transfer. We further reveal that the system strongly favors collinear antiferromagnetic ordering in the FeSe layers, but the spacing layers can be either antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic depending on the Fe$_{0.2}$ spatial distribution. Based on these understandings, we also predict (Li$_{0.8}$Co$_{0.2}$)OHFeSe to be structurally stable with even larger electron injection and potentially higher $T_c$.
  • We introduce the concept of optical control of the fluorescence yield of CdSe quantum dots through plasmon-induced structural changes in random semicontinuous nanostructured gold films. We demonstrate that the wavelength- and polarization dependent coupling between quantum dots and the semicontinuous films, and thus the fluorescent emission spectrum, can be controlled and significantly increased through the optical extinction of a selective band of eigenmodes in the films. This optical method of effecting controlled changes in the metal nanostructure allows for versatile functionality in a single sample and opens a pathway to in situ control over the fluorescence spectrum.
  • Lateral heterostructures of two-dimensional materials may exhibit various intriguing emergent properties. Yet when specified to the orientationally aligned heterojunctions of zigzag graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) nanoribbons, realizations of the high expectations on their properties encounter two standing hurtles. First, the rapid accumulation of strain energy prevents large- scale fabrication. Secondly, the pronounced half-metallicity predicted for freestanding graphene nanoribbons is severely suppressed. By properly tailoring orientational misalignment between zigzag graphene and chiral hBN nanoribbons, here we present a facile approach to overcome both obstacles. Our first-principles calculations show that the strain energy accumulation in such heterojunctions is significantly diminished for a range of misalignments. More strikingly, the half-metallicity is substantially enhanced from the orientationally aligned case, back to be comparable in magnitude with the freestanding case. The restored half-metallicity is largely attributed to the recovered superexchange interaction between the opposite heterojunction interfaces. The present findings may have important implications in eventual realization of graphene-based spintronics.
  • The exploration of topological states is of significant fundamental and practical importance in contemporary condensed matter physics, for which the extension to two-dimensional (2D) organometallic systems is particularly attractive. Using first-principles calculations, we show that a 2D hexagonal triphenyl-lead lattice composed of only main group elements is susceptible to a magnetic instability, characterized by a considerably more stable antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulating state rather than the topologically nontrivial quantum spin Hall state proposed recently. Even though this AFM phase is topologically trivial, it possesses an intricate emergent degree of freedom, defined by the product of spin and valley indices, leading to Berry curvature-induced spin and valley currents under electron or hole doping. Furthermore, such a trivial band insulator can be tuned into a topologically nontrivial matter by the application of an out-of-plane electric field, which destroys the AFM order, favoring instead ferrimagnetic spin ordering and a quantum anomalous Hall state with a non-zero topological invariant. These findings further enrich our understanding of 2D hexagonal organometallic lattices for potential applications in spintronics and valleytronics.
  • We present a comparative theoretical study of the effects of standard Anderson and magnetic disorders on the topological phases of two-dimensional Rashba spin-orbit coupled superconductors, with the initial state to be either topologically trivial or nontrivial. Using the self-consistent Born approximation approach, we show that the presence of Anderson disorders will drive a topological superconductor into a topologically trivial superconductor in the weak coupling limit. Even more strikingly, a topologically trivial superconductor can be driven into a topological superconductor upon diluted doping of independent magnetic disorders, which gradually narrow, close, and reopen the quasi-particle gap in a nontrivial manner. These topological phase transitions are distinctly characterized by the changes in the corresponding topological invariants. The central findings made here are also confirmed using a complementary numerical approach by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations self-consistently within a tight-binding model. The present study offers appealing new schemes for potential experimental realization of topological superconductors.
  • Rayleigh scattering poses an intrinsic limit for the transparency of organic liquid scintillators. This work focuses on the Rayleigh scattering length of linear alkylbenzene (LAB), which will be used as the solvent of the liquid scintillator in the central detector of the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory. We investigate the anisotropy of the Rayleigh scattering in LAB, showing that the resulting Rayleigh scattering length will be significantly shorter than reported before. Given the same overall light attenuation, this will result in a more efficient transmission of photons through the scintillator, increasing the amount of light collected by the photosensors and thereby the energy resolution of the detector.
  • The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and promises to have immense application potentials in future dissipation-less quantum electronics. Here we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by $n$-$p$ codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb$_2$Te$_3$ and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of $\sim$2\% V and $\sim$1\% I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the tell-tale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least $\sim$ 50 Kelvin, which is three orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized so far. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE.
  • It was recently proposed that the stress state of a material can also be altered via electron or hole doping, a concept termed electronic stress (ES), which is different from the traditional mechanical stress (MS) due to lattice contraction or expansion. Here we demonstrate the equivalence of ES and MS in structural stabilization, using In wires on Si(111) as a prototypical example. Our systematic density-functional theory calculations reveal that, first, for the same degrees of carrier doping into the In wires, the ES of the high-temperature metallic 4x1 structure is only slightly compressive, while that of the low-temperature insulating 8x2 structure is much larger and highly anisotropic. As a consequence, the intrinsic energy difference between the two phases is significantly reduced towards electronically phase-separated ground states. Our calculations further demonstrate quantitatively that such intriguing phase tunabilities can be achieved equivalently via lattice-contraction induced MS in the absence of charge doping. We also validate the equivalence through our detailed scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. The present findings have important implications in understanding the underlying driving forces involved in various phase transitions of simple and complex systems alike.
  • We has set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. From the scattering spectra it can be unambiguously shown that the depolarized part of light scattering belongs to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than it was expected. Therefore sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through the large liquid scintillator detector of JUNO. Our study is crucial to achieving the unprecedented energy resolution 3\%/$\sqrt{E\mathrm{(MeV)}}$ for JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to judge the attribution of the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.
  • We report the measurements of the densities of linear alkylbenzene at three temperatures over 4 to 23 Celsius degree with pressures up to 10 MPa. The measurements have been analysed to yield the isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and, so far for the first time, isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene. Relevance of results for current generation (i.e. Daya Bay) and next generation (i.e. JUNO) large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors are discussed.
  • The two inequivalent valleys in graphene preclude the protection against inter-valley scattering offered by an odd-number of Dirac cones characteristic of Z2 topological insulator phases. Here we propose a way to engineer a chiral single-valley metallic phase with quadratic crossover in a honeycomb lattice through tailored \sqrt{3}N *\sqrt{3}N or 3N *3N superlattices. The possibility of tuning valley-polarization via pseudo-Zeeman field and the emergence of Dresselhaus-type valley-orbit coupling are proposed in adatom decorated graphene superlattices. Such valley manipulation mechanisms and metallic phase can also find applications in honeycomb photonic crystals.
  • We propose realizing the quantum anomalous Hall effect by proximity coupling graphene to an antiferromagnetic insulator that provides both broken time-reversal symmetry and spin-orbit coupling. We illustrate our idea by performing ab initio calculations for graphene adsorbed on the (111) surface of BiFeO3. In this case, we find that the proximity-induced exchange field in graphene is about 70 meV, and that a topologically nontrivial band gap is opened by Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The size of the gap depends on the separation between the graphene and the thin film substrate, which can be tuned experimentally by applying external pressure.
  • At the interface of an s-wave superconductor and a three-dimensional topological insulator, Ma- jorana zero modes and Majorana helical states have been proposed to exist respectively around magnetic vortices and geometrical edges. Here we first show that a single magnetic impurity at such an interface splits each resonance state of a given spin channel outside the superconducting gap, and also induces two new symmetric impurity states inside the gap. Next we find that an increase in the superconducting gap suppresses both the oscillation magnitude and period of the RKKY inter- action between two interface magnetic impurities mediated by BCS quasi-particles. Within a mean field approximation, the ferromagnetic Curie temperature is found to be essentially independent of the superconducting gap, an intriguing phenomenon due to a compensation effect between the short-range ferromagnetic and long-range anti-ferromagnetic interactions. The existence of persis- tent ferromagnetism at the interface allows realization of a novel topological phase transition from a non-chiral to a chiral superconducting state at sufficiently low temperatures, providing a new platform for topological quantum computation.
  • Topological insulators (TIs) are bulk insulators that possess robust helical conducting states along their interfaces with conventional insulators. A tremendous research effort has recently been devoted to TI-based heterostructures, in which conventional proximity effects give rise to a series of exotic physical phenomena. This paper reviews our recent works on the potential existence of topological proximity effects at the interface between a topological insulator and a normal insulator or other topologically trivial systems. Using first-principles approaches, we have established the tunability of the vertical location of the topological helical state via intriguing dual-proximity effects. To further elucidate the control parameters of this effect, we have used the graphene-based heterostructures as prototypical systems to reveal a more complete phase diagram. On the application side of the topological helical states, we have presented a catalysis example, where the topological helical state plays an essential role in facilitating surface reactions by serving as an effective electron bath. These discoveries lay the foundation for accurate manipulation of the real space properties of the topological helical state in TI-based heterostructures and pave the way for realization of the salient functionality of topological insulators in future device applications.
  • Topological insulators (TI) are bulk insulators that possess robust chiral conducting states along their interfaces with normal insulators. A tremendous research effort has recently been devoted to TI-based heterostructures, in which conventional proximity effects give rise to many exotic physical phenomena. Here we establish the potential existence of "topological proximity effects" at the interface of a topological graphene nanoribbon (GNR) and a normal GNR. Specifically, we show that the location of the topological edge states exhibits versatile tunability as a function of the interface orientation, as well as the strengths of the interface coupling and spin-orbit coupling in the normal GNR. For zigzag and bearded GNRs, the topological edge state can be tuned to be either at the interface or outer edge of the normal ribbon. For armchair GNR, the potential location of the topological edge state can be further enriched to be at the edge of or within the normal ribbon, at the interface, or diving into the topological GNR. We also discuss potential experimental realization of the predicted topological proximity effects, which may pave the way for integrating the salient functionality of TI and graphene in future device applications.
  • Nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond are ideal platforms for quantum simulation, which allows one to handle problems that are intractable theoretically or experimentally. Here we propose a digital quantum simulation scheme to simulate the quantum phase transition occurring in an ultrathin topological insulator film placed in a parallel magnetic field [Zyuzin \textit{et al.}, Phys. Rev. B \textbf{83}, 245428 (2011)]. The quantum simulator employs high quality spin qubits achievable in nitrogen-vacancy centers and can be realized with existing technology. The problem can be mapped onto the Hamiltonian of two entangled qubits represented by the electron and nuclear spins. The simulation uses the Trotter algorithm, with an operation time of the order of 100 $\mu$s for each individual run.
  • We use spin-density-functional theory (SDFT) ab initio calculations to theoretically explore the possibility of achieving useful gate control over exchange coupling between cobalt clusters placed on a graphene sheet. By applying an electric field across supercells we demonstrate that the exchange interaction is strongly dependent on gate voltage, but find that it is also sensitive to the relative sublattice registration of the cobalt clusters. We use our results to discuss strategies for achieving strong and reproducible magneto-electric effects in graphene/transition-metal hybrid systems.