• Information spreading has been studied for decades, but its underlying mechanism is still under debate, especially for those ones spreading extremely fast through Internet. By focusing on the information spreading data of six typical events on Sina Weibo, we surprisingly find that the spreading of modern information shows some new features, i.e. either extremely fast or slow, depending on the individual events. To understand its mechanism, we present a Susceptible-Accepted-Recovered (SAR) model with both information sensitivity and social reinforcement. Numerical simulations show that the model can reproduce the main spreading patterns of the six typical events. By this model we further reveal that the spreading can be speeded up by increasing either the strength of information sensitivity or social reinforcement. Depending on the transmission probability and information sensitivity, the final accepted size can change from continuous to discontinuous transition when the strength of the social reinforcement is large. Moreover, an edge-based compartmental theory is presented to explain the numerical results. These findings may be of significance on the control of information spreading in modern society.
  • Recommender systems benefit us in tackling the problem of information overload by predicting our potential choices among diverse niche objects. So far, a variety of personalized recommendation algorithms have been proposed and most of them are based on similarities, such as collaborative filtering and mass diffusion. Here, we propose a novel vertex similarity index named CosRA, which combines advantages of both the cosine index and the resource-allocation (RA) index. By applying the CosRA index to real recommender systems including MovieLens, Netflix and RYM, we show that the CosRA-based method has better performance in accuracy, diversity and novelty than some benchmark methods. Moreover, the CosRA index is free of parameters, which is a significant advantage in real applications. Further experiments show that the introduction of two turnable parameters cannot remarkably improve the overall performance of the CosRA index.
  • Predicting the fast-rising young researchers (Academic Rising Stars) in the future provides useful guidance to the research community, e.g., offering competitive candidates to university for young faculty hiring as they are expected to have success academic careers. In this work, given a set of young researchers who have published the first first-author paper recently, we solve the problem of how to effectively predict the top k% researchers who achieve the highest citation increment in \Delta t years. We explore a series of factors that can drive an author to be fast-rising and design a novel impact increment ranking learning (IIRL) algorithm that leverages those factors to predict the academic rising stars. Experimental results on the large ArnetMiner dataset with over 1.7 million authors demonstrate the effectiveness of IIRL. Specifically, it outperforms all given benchmark methods, with over 8% average improvement. Further analysis demonstrates that the prediction models for different research topics follow the similar pattern. We also find that temporal features are the best indicators for rising stars prediction, while venue features are less relevant.
  • The impact that information diffusion has on epidemic spreading has recently attracted much attention. As a disease begins to spread in the population, information about the disease is transmitted to others, which in turn has an effect on the spread of disease. In this paper, using empirical results of the propagation of H7N9 and information about the disease, we clearly show that the spreading dynamics of the two-types of processes influence each other. We build a mathematical model in which both types of spreading dynamics are described using the SIS process in order to illustrate the influence of information diffusion on epidemic spreading. Both the simulation results and the pairwise analysis reveal that information diffusion can increase the threshold of an epidemic outbreak, decrease the final fraction of infected individuals and significantly decrease the rate at which the epidemic propagates. Additionally, we find that the multi-outbreak phenomena of epidemic spreading, along with the impact of information diffusion, is consistent with the empirical results. These findings highlight the requirement to maintain social awareness of diseases even when the epidemics seem to be under control in order to prevent a subsequent outbreak. These results may shed light on the in-depth understanding of the interplay between the dynamics of epidemic spreading and information diffusion.
  • can evolve simultaneously. For the information-driven adaptive process, susceptible (infected) individuals who have abilities to recognize the disease would break the links of their infected (susceptible) neighbors to prevent the epidemic from further spreading. Simulation results and numerical analyses based on the pairwise approach indicate that the information-driven adaptive process can not only slow down the speed of epidemic spreading, but can also diminish the epidemic prevalence at the final state significantly. In addition, the disease spreading and information diffusion pattern on the lattice give a visual representation about how the disease is trapped into an isolated field with the information-driven adaptive process. Furthermore, we perform the local bifurcation analysis on four types of dynamical regions, including healthy, oscillatory, bistable and endemic, to understand the evolution of the observed dynamical behaviors. This work may shed some lights on understanding how information affects human activities on responding to epidemic spreading.
  • Recommender systems, which can significantly help users find their interested items from the information era, has attracted an increasing attention from both the scientific and application society. One of the widest applied recommendation methods is the Matrix Factorization (MF). However, most of MF based approaches focus on the user-item rating matrix, but ignoring the ingredients which may have significant influence on users' preferences on items. In this paper, we propose a multi-linear interactive MF algorithm (MLIMF) to model the interactions between the users and each event associated with their final decisions. Our model considers not only the user-item rating information but also the pairwise interactions based on some empirically supported factors. In addition, we compared the proposed model with three typical other methods: user-based collaborative filtering (UCF), item-based collaborative filtering (ICF) and regularized MF (RMF). Experimental results on two real-world datasets, \emph{MovieLens} 1M and \emph{MovieLens} 100k, show that our method performs much better than other three methods in the accuracy of recommendation. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of modeling user online behaviors and the consequent decisions.
  • Recently, information transmission models motivated by the classical epidemic propagation, have been applied to a wide-range of social systems, generally assume that information mainly transmits among individuals via peer-to-peer interactions on social networks. In this paper, we consider one more approach for users to get information: the out-of-social-network influence. Empirical analyses of eight typical events' diffusion on a very large micro-blogging system, \emph{Sina Weibo}, show that the external influence has significant impact on information spreading along with social activities. In addition, we propose a theoretical model to interpret the spreading process via both internal and external channels, considering three essential properties: (i) memory effect; (ii) role of spreaders; and (iii) non-redundancy of contacts. Experimental and mathematical results indicate that the information indeed spreads much quicker and broader with mutual effects of the internal and external influences. More importantly, the present model reveals that the event characteristic would highly determine the essential spreading patterns once the network structure is established. The results may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the underlying dynamics of information transmission on real social networks.
  • In this paper, we proposed an evolving model via the hypergraph to illustrate the evolution of the citation network. In the evolving model, we consider the mechanism combined with preferential attachment and the aging influence. Simulation results show that the proposed model can characterize the citation distribution of the real system very well. In addition, we give the analytical result of the citation distribution using the master equation. Detailed analysis showed that the time decay factor should be the origin of the same citation distribution between the proposed model and the empirical result. The proposed model might shed some lights in understanding the underlying laws governing the structure of real citation networks.
  • As one of major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, so-called the item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. To our surprise, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs.
  • In this paper, based on the coupled social networks (CSN), we propose a hybrid algorithm to nonlinearly integrate both social and behavior information of online users. Filtering algorithm based on the coupled social networks, which considers the effects of both social influence and personalized preference. Experimental results on two real datasets, \emph{Epinions} and \emph{Friendfeed}, show that hybrid pattern can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also can enlarge the recommendation coverage while adopting global metric. Further empirical analyses demonstrate that the mutual reinforcement and rich-club phenomenon can also be found in coupled social networks where the identical individuals occupy the core position of the online system. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding structure and function of coupled social networks.
  • The past few years have witnessed the great success of recommender systems, which can significantly help users find out personalized items for them from the information era. One of the most widely applied recommendation methods is the Matrix Factorization (MF). However, most of researches on this topic have focused on mining the direct relationships between users and items. In this paper, we optimize the standard MF by integrating the user clustering regularization term. Our model considers not only the user-item rating information, but also takes into account the user interest. We compared the proposed model with three typical other methods: User-Mean (UM), Item-Mean (IM) and standard MF. Experimental results on a real-world dataset, \emph{MovieLens}, show that our method performs much better than other three methods in the accuracy of recommendation.
  • Nowadays, the emergence of online services provides various multi-relation information to support the comprehensive understanding of the epidemic spreading process. In this Letter, we consider the edge weights to represent such multi-role relations. In addition, we perform detailed analysis of two representative metrics, outbreak threshold and epidemic prevalence, on SIS and SIR models. Both theoretical and simulation results find good agreements with each other. Furthermore, experiments show that, on fully mixed networks, the weight distribution on edges would not affect the epidemic results once the average weight of whole network is fixed. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of epidemic spreading on multi-relation and weighted networks.
  • In this paper, based on the gravity principle of classical physics, we propose a tunable gravity-based model, which considers tag usage pattern to weigh both the mass and distance of network nodes. We then apply this model in solving the problems of information filtering and network evolving. Experimental results on two real-world data sets, \emph{Del.icio.us} and \emph{MovieLens}, show that it can not only enhance the algorithmic performance, but can also better characterize the properties of real networks. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the effect of gravity model.
  • Recently, contagion-based (disease, information, etc.) spreading on social networks has been extensively studied. In this paper, other than traditional full interaction, we propose a partial interaction based spreading model, considering that the informed individuals would transmit information to only a certain fraction of their neighbors due to the transmission ability in real-world social networks. Simulation results on three representative networks (BA, ER, WS) indicate that the spreading efficiency is highly correlated with the network heterogeneity. In addition, a special phenomenon, namely \emph{Information Blind Areas} where the network is separated by several information-unreachable clusters, will emerge from the spreading process. Furthermore, we also find that the size distribution of such information blind areas obeys power-law-like distribution, which has very similar exponent with that of site percolation. Detailed analyses show that the critical value is decreasing along with the network heterogeneity for the spreading process, which is complete the contrary to that of random selection. Moreover, the critical value in the latter process is also larger that of the former for the same network. Those findings might shed some lights in in-depth understanding the effect of network properties on information spreading.
  • Nowadays, information spreading on social networks has triggered an explosive attention in various disciplines. Most of previous works in this area mainly focus on discussing the effects of spreading probability or immunization strategy on static networks. However, in real systems, the peer-to-peer network structure changes constantly according to frequently social activities of users. In order to capture this dynamical property and study its impact on information spreading, in this paper, a link rewiring strategy based on the Fermi function is introduced. In the present model, the informed individuals tend to break old links and reconnect to their second-order friends with more uninformed neighbors. Simulation results on the susceptible-infected-recovered (\textit{SIR}) model with fixed recovery time $T=1$ indicate that the information would spread more faster and broader with the proposed rewiring strategy. Extensive analyses of the information cascade size distribution show that the spreading process of the initial steps plays a very important role, that is to say, the information will spread out if it is still survival at the beginning time. The proposed model may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of information spreading on dynamical social networks.
  • Food occupies a central position in every culture and it is therefore of great interest to understand the evolution of food culture. The advent of the World Wide Web and online recipe repositories has begun to provide unprecedented opportunities for data-driven, quantitative study of food culture. Here we harness an online database documenting recipes from various Chinese regional cuisines and investigate the similarity of regional cuisines in terms of geography and climate. We found that the geographical proximity, rather than climate proximity is a crucial factor that determines the similarity of regional cuisines. We develop a model of regional cuisine evolution that provides helpful clues to understand the evolution of cuisines and cultures.
  • In this Letter, we empirically study the influence of reciprocal links, in order to understand its role in affecting the structure and function of directed social networks. Experimental results on two representative datesets, Sina Weibo and Douban, demonstrate that the reciprocal links indeed play a more important role than non-reciprocal ones in both spreading information and maintaining the network robustness. In particular, the information spreading process can be significantly enhanced by considering the reciprocal effect. In addition, reciprocal links are largely responsible for the connectivity and efficiency of directed networks. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding and application of the reciprocal effect in directed online social networks.
  • Heterogeneity of both the source and target objects is taken into account in a network-based algorithm for the directional resource transformation between objects. Based on a biased heat conduction recommendation method (BHC) which considers the heterogeneity of the target object, we propose a heterogeneous heat conduction algorithm (HHC), by further taking the source object degree as the weight of diffusion. Tested on three real datasets, the Netflix, RYM and MovieLens, the HHC algorithm is found to present a better recommendation in both the accuracy and personalization than two excellent algorithms, i.e., the original BHC and a hybrid algorithm of heat conduction and mass diffusion (HHM), while not requiring any other accessorial information or parameter. Moreover, the HHC even elevates the recommendation accuracy on cold objects, referring to the so-called cold start problem, for effectively relieving the recommendation bias on objects with different level of popularity.
  • Despite the structural properties of online social networks have attracted much attention, the properties of the close-knit friendship structures remain an important question. Here, we mainly focus on how these mesoscale structures are affected by the local and global structural properties. Analyzing the data of four large-scale online social networks reveals several common structural properties. It is found that not only the local structures given by the indegree, outdegree, and reciprocal degree distributions follow a similar scaling behavior, the mesoscale structures represented by the distributions of close-knit friendship structures also exhibit a similar scaling law. The degree correlation is very weak over a wide range of the degrees. We propose a simple directed network model that captures the observed properties. The model incorporates two mechanisms: reciprocation and preferential attachment. Through rate equation analysis of our model, the local-scale and mesoscale structural properties are derived. In the local-scale, the same scaling behavior of indegree and outdegree distributions stems from indegree and outdegree of nodes both growing as the same function of the introduction time, and the reciprocal degree distribution also shows the same power-law due to the linear relationship between the reciprocal degree and in/outdegree of nodes. In the mesoscale, the distributions of four closed triples representing close-knit friendship structures are found to exhibit identical power-laws, a behavior attributed to the negligible degree correlations. Intriguingly, all the power-law exponents of the distributions in the local-scale and mesoscale depend only on one global parameter -- the mean in/outdegree, while both the mean in/outdegree and the reciprocity together determine the ratio of the reciprocal degree of a node to its in/outdegree.
  • In social sciences, there is currently no consensus on the mechanism for cultural evolution. The evolution of first names of newborn babies offers a remarkable example for the researches in the field. Here we perform statistical analyses on over 100 years of data in the United States. We focus in particular on how the frequency-rank distribution and inequality of baby names change over time. We propose a stochastic model where name choice is determined by personalized preference and social influence. Remarkably, variations on the strength of personalized preference can account satisfactorily for the observed empirical features. Therefore, we claim that personalization drives cultural evolution, at least in the example of baby names.
  • Voting online with explicit ratings could largely reflect people's preferences and objects' qualities, but ratings are always irrational, because they may be affected by many unpredictable factors like mood, weather, as well as other people's votes. By analyzing two real systems, this paper reveals a systematic bias embedding in the individual decision-making processes, namely people tend to give a low rating after a low rating, as well as a high rating following a high rating. This so-called \emph{anchoring bias} is validated via extensive comparisons with null models, and numerically speaking, the extent of bias decays with interval voting number in a logarithmic form. Our findings could be applied in the design of recommender systems and considered as important complementary materials to previous knowledge about anchoring effects on financial trades, performance judgements, auctions, and so on.
  • Pure methods generally perform excellently in either recommendation accuracy or diversity, whereas hybrid methods generally outperform pure cases in both recommendation accuracy and diversity, but encounter the dilemma of optimal hybridization parameter selection for different recommendation focuses. In this article, based on a user-item bipartite network, we propose a data characteristic based algorithm, by relating the hybridization parameter to the data characteristic. Different from previous hybrid methods, the present algorithm adaptively assign the optimal parameter specifically for each individual items according to the correlation between the algorithm and the item degrees. Compared with a highly accurate pure method, and a hybrid method which is outstanding in both the recommendation accuracy and the diversity, our method shows a remarkably promotional effect on the long-standing challenging problem of the cold start, as well as the recommendation diversity, while simultaneously keeps a high overall recommendation accuracy. Even compared with an improved hybrid method which is highly efficient on the cold start problem, the proposed method not only further improves the recommendation accuracy of the cold items, but also enhances the recommendation diversity. Our work might provide a promising way to better solving the personal recommendation from the perspective of relating algorithms with dataset properties.
  • Recommender systems can change our life a lot and help us select suitable and favorite items much more conveniently and easily. As a consequence, various kinds of algorithms have been proposed in last few years to improve the performance. However, all of them face one critical problem: data sparsity. In this paper, we proposed a two-step recommendation algorithm via iterative local least squares (ILLS). Firstly, we obtain the ratings matrix which is constructed via users' behavioral records, and it is normally very sparse. Secondly, we preprocess the "ratings" matrix through ProbS which can convert the sparse data to a dense one. Then we use ILLS to estimate those missing values. Finally, the recommendation list is generated. Experimental results on the three datasets: MovieLens, Netflix, RYM, suggest that the proposed method can enhance the algorithmic accuracy of AUC. Especially, it performs much better in dense datasets. Furthermore, since this methods can improve those missing value more accurately via iteration which might show light in discovering those inactive users' purchasing intention and eventually solving cold-start problem.
  • The past few years has witnessed the great success of recommender systems, which can significantly help users find relevant and interesting items for them in the information era. However, a vast class of researches in this area mainly focus on predicting missing links in bipartite user-item networks (represented as behavioral networks). Comparatively, the social impact, especially the network structure based properties, is relatively lack of study. In this paper, we firstly obtain five corresponding network-based features, including user activity, average neighbors' degree, clustering coefficient, assortative coefficient and discrimination, from social and behavioral networks, respectively. A hybrid algorithm is proposed to integrate those features from two respective networks. Subsequently, we employ a machine learning process to use those features to provide recommendation results in a binary classifier method. Experimental results on a real dataset, Flixster, suggest that the proposed method can significantly enhance the algorithmic accuracy. In addition, as network-based properties consider not only the social activities, but also take into account user preferences in the behavioral networks, therefore, it performs much better than that from either social or behavioral networks. Furthermore, since the features based on the behavioral network contain more diverse and meaningfully structural information, they play a vital role in uncovering users' potential preference, which, might show light in deeply understanding the structure and function of the social and behavioral networks.
  • In the past decade, Social Tagging Systems have attracted increasing attention from both physical and computer science communities. Besides the underlying structure and dynamics of tagging systems, many efforts have been addressed to unify tagging information to reveal user behaviors and preferences, extract the latent semantic relations among items, make recommendations, and so on. Specifically, this article summarizes recent progress about tag-aware recommender systems, emphasizing on the contributions from three mainstream perspectives and approaches: network-based methods, tensor-based methods, and the topic-based methods. Finally, we outline some other tag-related works and future challenges of tag-aware recommendation algorithms.