• The goal of this work is to study the cool, active binary star $\sigma^2$ CrB, focussing on its magnetic field. We used Stokes $IV$ data from the twin spectropolarimeters Narval at the TBL and ESPaDOnS at the CFHT. The least-squares deconvolution multi-line technique was used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We then applied a new binary Zeeman-Doppler imaging code to reconstruct simultaneously the magnetic topology and brightness distribution of both components. This analysis was carried out for two observational epochs in 2014 and 2017. A previously unconfirmed magnetic field of the primary star has been securely detected. The polarisation signatures of the secondary appear to have a systematically larger amplitude than that of the primary. This corresponds to a stronger magnetic field, for which the magnetic energy of the secondary exceeds that of the primary by a factor of 3.3-5.7. While the magnetic energy is similar for the secondary star in the two epochs, the magnetic energy is about twice as high in 2017 for the primary. The magnetic field topology of the two stars in the earlier epoch (2014) is very different. In the earlier epoch, the magnetic field at the visible pole appears to be of opposite polarity for the primary and secondary, suggesting linked magnetospheres. The apparent rotational periods of both $\sigma^2$ CrB components are longer than the orbital period, which we interpret as an evidence of a solar-like differential rotation. Despite their nearly identical fundamental parameters, the components of $\sigma^2$ CrB system exhibit different magnetic field properties. This indicates that the magnetic dynamo process is a very sensitive function of stellar parameters.
  • HD 156324 is an SB3 (B2V/B5V/B5V) system in the Sco OB4 association. The He-strong primary possesses both a strong magnetic field, and H$\alpha$ emission believed to originate in its Centrifugal Magnetosphere (CM). We analyse a large spectroscopic and high-resolution spectropolarimetric dataset. The radial velocities (RVs) indicate that the system is composed of two sub-systems, which we designate A and B. Period analysis of the RVs of the three components yields orbital periods $P_{\rm orb} = 1.5806(1)$~d for the Aa and Ab components, and 6.67(2)~d for the B component, a PGa star. Period analysis of the longitudinal magnetic field \bz~and H$\alpha$ equivalent widths, which should both be sensitive to the rotational period $P_{\rm rot}$ of the magnetic Aa component, both yield $\sim$1.58~d. Since $P_{\rm orb} = P_{\rm rot}$ Aa and Ab must be tidally locked. Consistent with this, the orbit is circularized, and the rotational and orbital inclinations are identical within uncertainty, as are the semi-major axis and the Kepler corotation radius. The star's H$\alpha$ emission morphology differs markedly from both theoretical and observational expectations in that there is only one, rather than two, emission peaks. We propose that this unusual morphology may be a consequence of modification of the gravitocentrifugal potential by the presence of the close stellar companion. We also obtain upper limits on the magnetic dipole strength $B_{\rm d}$ for the Ab and B components, respectively finding $B_{\rm d} < 2.6$~kG and $<0.7$~kG.
  • Until recently almost nothing was known about the evolution of magnetic fields found in upper main sequence Ap/Bp stars during their long main sequence lifetime. We are thus studying magnetic Ap/Bp stars in open clusters in order to obtain observational evidence of how the properties of Ap/Bp magnetic stars, such as field strength and structure, evolve with age during the main sequence. One important aspect of this study is to search for the very rare examples of hot magnetic stars in short-period binary systems among magnetic cluster members. In this paper we characterize the object BD-19~5044L, which is both a member of the open cluster IC 4725 = M~25, and a short-period SB2 system containing a magnetic primary star. We have obtained a series of intensity and circular polarisation spectra distributed through the orbital and rotation cycles of BD-19 5044L with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at CFHT. We find that the orbit of BD-19 5044L AB is quite eccentric (e = 0.477), with a period of 17.63 d. The primary is a magnetic Bp star with a variable longitudinal magnetic field, a polar field strength of ~1400 G and a low obliquity, while the secondary is probably a hot Am star and does not appear to be magnetic. The rotation period of the primary (5.04 d) is not synchronised with the orbit, but the rotation angular velocity is close to being synchronised with the orbital angular velocity of the secondary at periastron, perhaps as a result of tidal interactions. The periastron separation is small enough (about 12 times the radius of the primary star) that BD-19 5044L may be one of the very rare known cases of a tidally interacting SB2 binary system containing a magnetic Ap/Bp star.
  • Amongst O-type stars with detected magnetic fields, the fast rotator in the close binary called Plaskett's star shows a variety of unusual properties. Since strong binary interactions are believed to have occurred in this system, one may wonder about their potential role in generating magnetic fields. Stokes V spectra collected with the low-resolution FORS2 and high-resolution ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimeters were therefore used to search for magnetic fields in 15 interacting or post-interaction massive binaries. No magnetic field was detected in any of them, with 0G always being within 2sigma of the derived values. For 17 out of 25 stars in the systems observed at high-resolution, the 90% upper limit on the individual dipolar fields is below the dipolar field strength of Plaskett's secondary; a similar result is found for five out of six systems observed at low resolution. If our sample is considered to form a group of stars sharing similar magnetic properties, a global statistical analysis results in a stringent upper limit of ~200G on the dipolar field strength. Moreover, the magnetic incidence rate in the full sample of interacting or post-interaction systems (our targets + Plaskett's star) is compatible with that measured from large surveys, showing that they are not significantly different from the general O-star population. These results suggest that binary interactions play no systematic role in the magnetism of such massive systems.
  • We employ high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry to derive the physical properties and magnetic characteristics of the multiple system HD 164492C, located in the young open cluster M20. The spectrum reveals evidence of 3 components: a broad-lined early B star (HD 164492C1), a narrow-lined early B star (HD 164492C2), and a late B star (HD 164492C3). Components C2 and C3 exhibit significant ($>100$ km/s) bulk radial velocity variations with a period of $12.5351(7)$ d that we attribute to eccentric binary motion around a common centre-of-mass. Component C1 exhibits no detectable radial velocity variations. Using constraints derived from modeling the orbit of the C2+C3 binary and from synthesis of the combined spectrum, we determine the approximate physical characteristics of the components. We conclude that a coherent evolutionary solution consistent with the published age of M20 implies a distance to the system of $0.9\pm 0.2$ kpc, corresponding to the smallest published values. We confirm the detection of a strong magnetic field in the combined spectrum. The field is clearly associated with the broad-lined C1 component of the system. Repeated measurement of the longitudinal magnetic field allows the derivation of the rotation period of the magnetic star, $P_{\rm rot}=1.36986(6)$ d. We derive the star's magnetic geometry, finding $i=63\pm 6$ deg, $\beta=33\pm 6$ deg and a dipole polar strength $B_{\rm d}=7.9^{+1.2}_{-1.0}$ kG. Strong emission - varying according to the magnetic period - is detected in the H$\alpha$ profile. This is consistent with the presence of a centrifugal magnetosphere surrounding the rapidly rotating magnetic C1 component.
  • (Abridged) In the framework of the BinaMicS project, we have begun a study of the magnetic properties of a sample of intermediate-mass and massive short-period binary systems, as a function of binarity properties. We report in this paper the characterisation of the magnetic field of HD 5550, a double-lined spectroscopic binary system of intermediate-mass, using high-resolution spectropolarimetric Narval observations of HD 5550. We first fit the intensity spectra using Zeeman/ATLAS9 LTE synthetic spectra to estimate the effective temperatures, microturbulent velocities, and the abundances of some elements of both components, as well as the light-ratio of the system. We then fit the least-square deconvolved $I$ profiles to determine the radial and projected rotational velocities of both stars. We then analysed the shape and evolution of the LSD $V$ profiles using the oblique rotator model to characterise the magnetic fields of both stars. We confirm the Ap nature of the primary, previously reported in the literature, and find that the secondary displays spectral characteristics typical of an Am star. While a magnetic field is clearly detected in the lines of the primary, no magnetic field is detected in the secondary, in any of our observation. If a dipolar field were present at the surface of the Am star, its polar strength must be below 40 G. The faint variability observed in the Stokes $V$ profiles of the Ap star allowed us to propose a rotation period of $6.84_{-0.39}^{+0.61}$ d, close to the orbital period ($\sim$6.82 d), suggesting that the star is synchronised with its orbit. By fitting the variability of the $V$ profiles, we propose that the Ap component hosts a dipolar field inclined with the rotation axis at an angle $\beta=156\pm17$ $^{\circ}$ and a polar strength $B_{\rm d}=65 \pm 20$ G. The field strength is the weakest known for an Ap star.
  • HD5550 is a spectroscopic binary composed of two A stars observed with Narval at TBL in the frame of the BinaMIcS (Binarity and Magnetic Interactions in various classes of Stars) Large Program. One component of the system is found to be an Ap star with a surprisingly weak dipolar field of ~65 G. The companion is an Am star for which no magnetic field is detected, with a detection threshold on the dipolar field of ~40 G. The system is tidally locked, the primary component is synchronised with the orbit, but the system is probably not completely circularised yet. This work is only the second detailed study of magnetic fields in a hot short-period spectroscopic binary. More systems are currently being observed with both Narval at TBL and ESPaDOnS at CFHT within the BinaMIcS project, with the goal of understanding how magnetism can impact binary evolution and vice versa.
  • The "Binarity and Magnetic Interactions in various classes of stars" (BinaMIcS) project is based on two large programs of spectropolarimetric observations with ESPaDOnS at CFHT and Narval at TBL. Three samples of spectroscopic binaries with two spectra (SB2) are observed: known cool magnetic binaries, the few known hot magnetic binaries, and a survey sample of hot binaries to search for additional hot magnetic binaries. The goal of BinaMIcS is to understand the complex interplay between stellar magnetism and binarity. To this aim, we will characterise and model the magnetic fields, magnetospheric structure and coupling of both components of hot and cool close binary systems over a significant range of evolutionary stages, to confront current theories and trigger new ones. First results already provided interesting clues, e.g. about the origin of magnetism in hot stars.
  • High-resolution circular spectropolarimetric observations, obtained with ESPaDOnS in the context of the BinaMIcS Large Program, have revealed a magnetic field in the B3V secondary component of the SB2 binary system $\epsilon$ Lupi (B2/B3). As the B2V primary is already known to be magnetic, this is the first detection of a magnetic field in both components of an early-type binary system. The longitudinal magnetic field of the primary is $\sim -200$ G; that of the secondary $\sim +100$ G. Observations can be approximately reproduced by a model assuming the magnetic axes of the two stars are anti-aligned, and roughly parallel to their respective rotation axes. Estimated magnetospheric radii indicate a high probability that their magnetospheres are interacting. As many of the arguments for the different proposed formation scenarios of fossil magnetic fields rely upon evidence drawn from investigations of close binaries, in particular the rarity of magnetic ABO stars in close binaries and the previous absence of any known close binary with two magnetic, massive stars, this discovery may be an important new constraint on the origin of fossil magnetic fields.
  • It is now well established that a fraction of the massive (M>8 Msun) star population hosts strong, organised magnetic fields, most likely of fossil origin. The details of the generation and evolution of these fields are still poorly understood. The BinaMIcS project takes an important step towards the understanding of the interplay between binarity and magnetism during the stellar formation and evolution, and in particular the genesis of fossil fields, by studying the magnetic properties of close binary systems. The components of such systems are most likely formed together, at the same time and in the same environment, and can therefore help us to disentangle the role of initial conditions on the magnetic properties of the massive stars from other competing effects such as age or rotation. We present here the main scientific objectives of the BinaMIcS project, as well as preliminary results from the first year of observations from the associated ESPaDOnS and Narval spectropolarimetric surveys.
  • We review the different theoretical challenges concerning magnetism in interacting binary or multiple stars that will be studied in the BinaMIcS (Binarity and Magnetic Interactions in various classes of Stars) project during the corresponding spectropolarimetric Large Programs at CFHT and TBL. We describe how completely new and innovative topics will be studied with BinaMIcS such as the complex interactions between tidal flows and stellar magnetic fields, the MHD star-star interactions, and the role of stellar magnetism in stellar formation and vice versa. This will strongly modify our vision of the evolution of interacting binary and multiple stars.
  • We present the BinaMIcS project, its goals and the first BinaMIcS spectropolarimetric observations obtained with Narval at TBL and ESPaDOnS at CFHT: dedicated time-series for targeted hot and cool close double-line spectroscopic (SB2) binaries and a survey of hot close SB2 binaries. The very first results are also presented. In particular, our first survey observations seem to show a lack of magnetic fields in hot close binaries compared to single stars.